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Thread: [Preview] Iweriu

  1. #1
    Ritter-Floh's Avatar Artifex
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    Default [Preview] Iweriu

    Iweriu





    Overview:
    As the Bronze Age in Ireland drew to a close, there appeared in Ireland a new cultural influence. Developing in the Alps of central Europe, the Celts spread their culture across modern-day Germany and France and into the Balkans as far as Turkey. They arrived in Britain and Ireland around 500BC and within a few hundred years, Ireland's Bronze Age culture had all but disappeared, and Celtic culture was in place across the entire island.

    Celtic influences (for it was a culture, not an empire) had spread across much of central Europe and spread into Iberia and the British Isles. The Celts called Britain and Ireland the "Pretanic Islands" which evolved into the modern word "Britain". The word "Celt" comes from the Greeks, who called the tribes to their north the "Keltoi", but there is no evidence that the Celts ever referred to themselves by that name. To the south a small upstart republic, with its capital at Rome, was minding its own business. However it was these Romans who, a few centuries later, would supercede Celtic culture across most of Europe when they built their huge Roman Empire, which stretched from Palestine to England.

    The Celts had one major advantage - they had discovered Iron. Iron had been introduced to the Celtic peoples in Europe around 1000 to 700BC, thus giving them the technological edge to spread as they did. Iron was a far superior metal to bronze, being stronger and more durable. On the other hand, it required much hotter fires to extract it from its ore and so it took a fair degree of skill to use iron. None of this is to be taken to mean that bronze fell out of use. Rather, iron simply became an alternative metal and many bronze objects have been found that were made in the Iron Age.

    Whether or not the arrival of the Celts in Ireland was an actual invasion, or a more gradual assimilation, is an open question. On the one hand, the Celts - who were by no means pacifists - must have arrived in sufficiently large numbers to obliterate the existing culture in Ireland within a few hundred years. On the other hand, other better documented invasions of Ireland - such as the Viking invasions of the 7th and 8th centuries AD - failed to have the effect of changing the culture on an islandwide scale. Current academic opinion favours the theory that the Celts arrived in Ireland over the course of several centuries, beginning in the late Bronze Age with Celts of the early iron-using Hallstatt group of people, to be followed after 300BC by Celts of the La Tène cultural group which formed within the Hallstatt group.

    Some have postulated that, as the Romans invaded and took control of the continental Celtic territories of Gaul [France] and Iberia [Spain and Portugal], some of the displaced Celts travelled to unconquered Celtic lands such as Britain and Ireland. The medieval "Book of Invasions" talks about Milesians and Fír Bolg arriving in Ireland. These have been identified with displaced Celts from Spain and Belgium, respectively, although this is conjecture.

    The earliest pseudo-historical information that we have about Iron Age Celtic Ireland is from Carthaginian, Roman and Greek writers, who probably got their information from sailors who had been to the British Isles. There are writings from the 4th century AD by the Roman Avienus which are thought to be based on accounts from an early Greek voyage in the 6th century BC. These describe Celts in France and in the North Sea, where the British Isles are. He calls Ireland Insula Sacra (Holy Island) and its inhabitants gens hiernorum, thought to be a Latinisation of the Greek word for Ireland, Ierne. This, in all likelihood, is a modification of the word Ériu, which may be an original Celtic word for Ireland and a root of the later Irish word Eire and eventually the English word Ireland. The Greek Pytheas refers to the British Isles as the Pretanic Islands, which is derived from Priteni - definitely a Celtic word. In 52BC, the Romans were referring to Ireland as Hibernia, possibly extracted again from the Greek word Ierne.

    By far the most interesting historical account of these early times is that of the Greek Ptolemy. His map of Ireland, published in Geographia, was compiled in the second century AD, but based on an account from around 100AD. No surviving originals exist, but we do have a copy dating from 1490AD.


    Historians have been able to use this fascinating map to identify some of the Celtic tribes living in Ireland at the time. Many of the names cannot be identified with known tribes (particularly those in the west), and the names have been badly corrupted by being passed word-of-mouth. However, others are readily identifiable. Also on the map are the names of rivers and islands which can be identified with existing features. All this information has allowed historians to create a picture of the probable Celtic tribes living in Ireland at the time (100AD). Our map is given below. Note that Ireland was by no means isolated. Some of the tribes straddled both sides of the Irish Sea, while others had relations in Gaul (France).

    In the last centuries BC, the rest of Celtic Europe fell to the expanding Roman Empire. The Celts of southern Britain were conquered in 43AD. Stopping short of the Picts of modern-day Scotland, the Roman emperor Hadrian built his famous wall between the Celts of the north and Roman Britain. Did the Roman armies invade Ireland? The answer is no, but we know they did consider it. During a foray into southern Scotland, the Roman General Agricola looked across the North Channel towards the Irish coast. The writer Tacitus reports that Agricola "saw that Ireland... conveniently situated for the ports of Gaul might prove a valuable acquisition" and that "I have often heard Agricola declare that a single legion, with a moderate band of auxilaries, would be enough to finish the conquest of Ireland". However an invasion never took place - not because the Irish would be too hard to defeat, but simply because the Romans decided it wouldn't be worth the effort.
    However, Ireland did come under heavy Roman influence, even if not under its rule. In the first and second centuries AD, there is evidence that there was sporadic trading between the Irish and the Romans of Britain. Tacitus, writing in the first century AD, says of Ireland "the interior parts are little known, but through commerical intercourse and the merchants there is better knowledge of the harbours and approaches". Evidence of a Roman trading post has been found near Dublin. However, it was not until the fourth and fifth centuries AD that there is evidence of prolonged Roman influences in Ireland. Roman coins and other implements have been found in Ireland. There is evidence that the language spoken by the Eóganacht of Munster, who arrived at the end of the Iron Age, had been heavily influenced by Latin. Finally, it is certain that Ogham, the first written scripts in the Irish language, was based on the Latin alphabet.

    Towards the end of the pre-Christian period, as the Roman Empire and its colony in Britain declined, the Irish took advantage and began raiding western Britain. Picts from Scotland and Saxons from Germany raided other parts of the colony. As their raids got ever more successful, the Irish began to colonise western Britain. The Érainn of Munster settled in Cornwall, the Laigin of Leinster settled in south Wales while the Déisi of south-east Ireland settled in north Wales. Cormac of Cashel (writing much later, in 908AD) records that "The power of the Irish over the Britons was great, and they had divided Britain between them into estates... and the Irish lived as much east of the sea as they did in Ireland". These colonies were all defeated by the Britons within the next century or so, although Irish kings seemed to be still ruling in south Wales as late as the tenth century. The map shows these colonies.


    But by far the most successful colony was that of the Dál Riata in western Scotland. Their colony thrived and, in fact, it seems that most or all Dál Riatans ultimately left northern Ireland for the new colony. Probably founding the colony around 400-500AD, Dál Riata was well established by 563AD and in the ninth century it took control of Pictland, to the east, and founding the united kingdom of Scotland.


    This faction overhaul will be released with 1.2

    Units
    This faction overhaul adds 13 new units to the Ebdani. Here are some pictures of the new units:

    Spear Infantry
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Irish Nobles) They were the best equipped of all, with elaborated armors. Noble helmets were also crested, plumed, feathered, and highly recoignisable of the battlefield, when fightning on foot.


    (Irish Champions) They were just the best of the Eblani warriors, themselves maintained by their personnal accounts of prowesses. So they have been the cream of any professional warrior on the battlefield and it was probably a supreme honor to be called as such.


    (Irish Levied Spearmen) Among celtic classes, the peasants were not slaves, they had civil rights, but also a harsh life to the service of the warrior class. They were not intended to fight, but follow the army if the tribe territory was threatened, and if druids give them favourable omens.

    Melee Infantry
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Irish Swordsmen) These men are the Kladibabekos, the sword-wielding warriors. With murderous blades they carve out their place in the community. Where lesser men may plough the fields to earn their porridge, these men harvest the spoils of war.


    (Irish Veteran Warriors) They were highly mobile warriors, using spears as well as longswords. Helmets were simplified, like the coolus. They had no armor but perhaps a light leather jacket. All was conceinved for a maximized mobility and speed on the battlefield. As usual, the main decisive shock was provided by a single, furious charge.


    (Painted Warriors) They were physically out of any standards, being chosen men first by their strenght, some using helmets and heavy swords. Perfect line-breakers, they could also be described as young "champions", not wealthy enough to afford armour, or don't use it in order to be more agile. In some way, they were tattoed and usually half, or completely naked, their hairs usually painted and coated with white cender to be more impressive.


    (Irish Elite Swordsmen) These swordsmen were older and very experienced, usually having a good quality helmet, and a leather amor under their tunic. They were elite swordsmen, using heavy javelins and long swords for devastating slashings. They were designed for flanking attacks.

    Missile Infantry
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Irish Raiders) These very common spearmen and skirmishers are generally more experienced and better equipped than most of the levied troops. They have a short sword for close fighting, but they rely on their gaiso spears first.


    (Irish Slingers) Slingers were very common and formed a large part of the infantry. In fact, they were devastating also, but easy prey in case of counterattack, especially by cavalry. it is dubious that they have been supported by spearmen, as nearly all of them were in the central formation and opened the battle, weakening the enemy first ranks before the main schock.


    (Irish Skirmishers) These are hardy men, born of the soil, and to the soil they are wed. In southern lands, the farmers are weak folk, but here in Iuernion, a land of magic, mirth and myth, they are as steadfast as the oak. How could a man not be steadfast in the face of those who would steal his herds and enslave his family?

    Cavalry
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Irish Noble Horse) A warrior who asks to be clad in iron is either too stupid or slow to avoid the blows of his foes. Instead of shirts of mail or sleeves of iron, it is with simple cloaks bedecked by torcs of gold that these men ride down their foes. Even leather armour finds currency with only a few such men.


    (Irish Light Cavalry) They were equipped with javelins or two gaisos, one for launching and another for charging, but also a longsword for close fight. Body armours were rare, but helmets were common. They were fast, and used perhaps also "germanic" tactics which involved light infantrymen and light cavalry attacking together. They were also a good scouting unit.

    Chariots
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Irish Chariots) Well suited for flat terrains, celtic chariots were a quite safer place for nobles than the front line. Charging with great speed from the rear of their own lines to strike into the confusion of the battle, from backwards and from the flanks. Spears, javelins, and sword became then as deadly as if they were used from a cavalryman.


    Credits:
    wesleyjohnston.com
    Book of Kells
    Rome's Enemies (2): Gallic & British Celts (Men-at-Arms)
    Sebidee for helping me planning this roster
    zombieflanders for the proto-Goedelic irish faction and units names

    Ritter's Cartoons and Artwork
    If you think my work is worth it, feel free to donate me.

  2. #2

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Great work! Those are some big swords
    Art finds her own perfection within, and not outside of herself. She is not to be judged by any external standard of resemblance. She is a veil, rather than a mirror. -Oscar Wilde

  3. #3

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Very impressed with these guys! A lot more accurate than I was expecting. If I had to complain though I would say that I think far too many of the units are wearing trousers and shoes and not enough are wearing cloaks. I know that contrary to popular belief trousers were worn by the ancient Irish but I don't think it would've been with this much frequency, in later artwork we find the majority of soldiers and civilians going bare-legged and barefoot and I don't think it would've been much different in this period. People often think of cloaks as being for the upper crust of society, but Irish rich and poor alike were very fond of cloaks, it's just that the rich would've had more colourful ones.

  4. #4

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Finally I can auto-resolve battles with Eire other-place than Crusader Kings II.

  5. #5

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Quote Originally Posted by Ultach View Post
    If I had to complain though I would say that I think far too many of the units are wearing trousers and shoes and not enough are wearing cloaks.
    Yeah, I'm disappointed by the lack of levy units wearing what seemed to be the regular dress of the Gaels for roughly a millennium in Ireland - namely a sort of woolen cloak or mantle (often with a hood) worn over a knee-length tunic with little to no clothing covering lower parts of the legs or feet. As you pointed out, trousers are a big no-no for depictions of the Gaels.

    However, such dress is quite different to any other units in the game, and so I can understand that making them for an AI faction would be a lot of work for the team. I like the distinct shields that were given to the Ebdani though - they look pretty much how I imagine most shields to have looked in the more scattered pastoral tribes of Europe at the time.
    Last edited by KennyTheKlever; December 23, 2016 at 09:42 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Coolio!


    They tried to tame you
    Looks like they'll try again

  7. #7

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Quote Originally Posted by Ultach View Post
    Very impressed with these guys! A lot more accurate than I was expecting. If I had to complain though I would say that I think far too many of the units are wearing trousers and shoes and not enough are wearing cloaks. I know that contrary to popular belief trousers were worn by the ancient Irish but I don't think it would've been with this much frequency, in later artwork we find the majority of soldiers and civilians going bare-legged and barefoot and I don't think it would've been much different in this period. People often think of cloaks as being for the upper crust of society, but Irish rich and poor alike were very fond of cloaks, it's just that the rich would've had more colourful ones.
    Quote Originally Posted by KennyTheKlever View Post
    However, such dress is quite different to any other units in the game, and so I can understand that making them for an AI faction would be a lot of work for the team. I like the distinct shields that were given to the Ebdani though - they look pretty much how I imagine most shields to have looked in the more scattered pastoral tribes of Europe at the time.
    I have no authority to weigh on in the frequency of trousers debate. In fact, I don't really want to go near such an important topic - the Great Trousers Debate of 2016!
    I will say that this faction is not just AI - like all of our preview factions, it will be playable. Also, to be fair to Ritter, I asked that a lot of the newer faction overhaul ideas use existing assets where possible, due to the current bloated mod size and the unfortunate need to have it on Steam.
    Last edited by Dresden; December 23, 2016 at 02:50 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Quote Originally Posted by Dresden View Post
    I asked that a lot of the newer faction overhaul ideas use existing assets where possible, due to the current bloated mod size and the unfortunate need to have it on Steam.
    Yeah, and along with the increased effort of making unique gaelic units going barefoot with hooded mantles and so on, I understand why you kept them in line with most of the other celtic tribes. Good to hear that they'll be playable btw - I didn't think all of the previews were of factions that would be playable in 1.2.

    Please tell me that the 'need' to have the mod on steam isn't limiting the project significantly, it it? I'm guessing it's just the potential of having to split the mod up into even more than 6 parts that you're trying to avoid...

  9. #9

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Its going to be more than 6 parts easily - 1.2 is huge. But, yes, Steam does limit us somewhat although we try not to let it.

    Well...its more like I try to stop Ritter and Don from adding things and they do anyway I am the keeper of the megabytes! none shall pass!
    Last edited by Dresden; December 23, 2016 at 05:09 PM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    Not to mention there's a black hand behind Don and Ritter...

  11. #11
    Irishmafia2020's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    All of these amazing previews have me really excited for 1.2... I have my fingers crossed that it will be released soon - it would be like getting an entire new game for Christmas! Actually I might really try the Irish faction out of ethnic pride - conquering Britain and invading Gaul would be a nice change of pace from my usual Hellenistic campaigns... Nice job guys, and happy holidays!

  12. #12

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    I've got to say this update is a bit pants.
    "Duty is the great business of a sea officer; all private considerations must give way to it, however painful it may be" - Horatio Nelson.

  13. #13

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    I see what you did there!

  14. #14

    Default Re: [Preview] Iweriu

    "Duty is the great business of a sea officer; all private considerations must give way to it, however painful it may be" - Horatio Nelson.

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