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Thread: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

  1. #1

    Default Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Based on almost everything I read about the US, from the Europeans perspective, everything the US does is wrong, it's evil, it's self centered blah blah blah blah.

    If that is so, why doesn't Europe sever their alliance and all their treaties with the US, the same goes for Britain, and just go their own way? Wouldn't that be easier than having to argue with another country on what to do and how to do things?

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    antaeus's Avatar Cool and normal
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Hi Ashton.

    You don't have to be friends to have treaties and alliances.

    But that aside, having differences of opinion does not = enemies. I dislike things my family do, that does not mean I want to rid myself of my family. One could argue that the ability to express difference of opinion is a strength in a close relationship.
    IN PATROCINIVM SVB MARENOSTRUM

  3. #3

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by antaeus View Post
    having differences of opinion does not = enemies.
    It does if Europe's goal is to bring back the glory days when they were masters.
    Last edited by Abdülmecid I; January 13, 2022 at 04:49 AM. Reason: Personal.

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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Based on almost everything I read about the US, from the Europeans perspective, everything the US does is wrong, it's evil, it's self centered blah blah blah blah.

    If that is so, why doesn't Europe sever their alliance and all their treaties with the US, the same goes for Britain, and just go their own way? Wouldn't that be easier than having to argue with another country on what to do and how to do things?
    Err but in reality Europe does not absoultly disagree with the US on Everything you have to reading some fairly biased sources to come to that conclusion.

    Second last I checked there is no monolithic Europe - quite of a bit disagreement exists under the hood of that description.

    Third A world without treaties is a very ugly place.

    ----

    It does if Europe's goal is to bring back the glory days when they were masters.
    Glory if you are not the one fighting and dying to make them happen. Or working long hows for little pay to make the industrial revolution happen and dying at 30 if lucky.
    Last edited by conon394; January 13, 2022 at 11:22 AM.
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    But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in battle, shall join together at the latter day and cry all 'We died at such a place; some swearing, some crying for surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left.

    Hyperides of Athens: We know, replied he, that Antipater is good, but we (the Demos of Athens) have no need of a master at present, even a good one.

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    EmperorBatman999's Avatar I say, what, what?
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    It largely comes from the fact that Europe is weak on its own. It has no army and Brussels lacks the authority yet to assert its rule as law across the Member States. Although the EU fancies itself to be its own political bloc and a superpower of sorts, it has yet to have consolidated into the federalized entity necessary to put it on par with US, Russia, and China. This is especially the case militarily without the United Kingdom anymore (France was Europe's Army, Britain Europe's navy, and Germany is Europe's economy). Without the US partnership, this divided Europe wouldn't be able to stand to the predations of Russia or the economic colonialism of China. At the very least, Europe can still say they are in a partnership with their fellow democracy, the United States. In the manner of smug superiority, Europe can say that they get America's protection without actually needing to contribute much back to the United States.
    Last edited by EmperorBatman999; January 13, 2022 at 08:28 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Most Westerners (with few notable exceptions) are in the same boat, we are all stuck in this corrupt "representative democracy" oligarchy, where we get to chose between 2-3 "centrist" boomers that work for same corporations and funded by same billionaires and NGOs.
    I'd also add that "European perspective" can be easily misrepresented. For example, CBC hardly represents what Canadians think, while CNN doesn't represent what Americans think, nor would, say PressTV represent everyone in Iran, so it is fair to apply same logic to legacy media in EU. Most of Western legacy media are just corporate propaganda outlets and it would be a mistake to consider them as objective sources of information or some kind of representation of public opinion.
    At the end of the day, we are not that different - and our enemy is the same - corrupt degenerate ruling classes, that want to steal our taxes and reign over us indefinitely.

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    Ludicus's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by conon394 View Post
    ]Err but in reality Europe does not absoultly disagree with the US on Everything

    Indeed. For example, Europe, U.S. try to appear united in face off with Russia over ...

    Quote Originally Posted by conon394 View Post
    Second last I checked there is no monolithic Europe - quite of a bit disagreement exists under the hood of that description.

    Absolutely. It is dependent on a number of factors, namely the balance of three or four dominant European powers -and their political parties.
    In fact, as EmperorBatman999 has pointed out, "Brussels lacks the authority yet to assert its rule". That's because the EU is ruled by an illegal and antidemocratic ( "informal", as they say) Eurogroup.
    This is the reason why I stand up for a different Europe,
    This project can be adopted and applied as it stands by the countries who so wish, with no single country being able to block those who want to advance”. Read the Manifesto. Project, Budget, and Treaty are clearly detailed. Manifesto for the democratization of Europe

    Don’t miss the explanatory statement. Key excerpts,

    The Euro Group
    , an informal forum bringing together the finance ministers of the States whose currency is the Euro, has become the linchpin of this new Europe which emerged from the crisis.
    (...) this significant strengthening of the executive capacity of European institutions in the field of economic, budgetary, fiscal and social policy has taken place without the parallel involvement of parliaments in its steering and control. The European Parliament has been largely excluded from this economic goverment.
    (...) As it increases citizen disaffection towards the European project, this deficit of democratic legitimacy, together with the inability to meet the challenges Europe currently faces, carry the risk of a breakup of the European Union and national closure.
    (...) Europe will only reconnect with its citizens if its proves it has the ability to bring about a genuine European solidarity, by having the main beneficiaries of the globalization process fairly contribute to the financing of the public goods Europe desperately needs.
    (...) only a European Assembly composed of national and European representatives elected by universal suffrage has today the legitimacy needed to steer and control its action
    ---
    Read the 21 articles of the Treaty on democratization of the economic and social government of the Union. By the people and for the people.
    Last edited by Ludicus; January 13, 2022 at 01:00 PM.
    Il y a quelque chose de pire que d'avoir une âme perverse. C’est d'avoir une âme habituée
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    This is the reason why I stand up for a different Europe,
    This project can be adopted and applied as it stands by the countries who so wish, with no single country being able to block those who want to advance”. Read the Manifesto. Project, Budget, and Treaty are clearly detailed. Manifesto for the democratization of Europe
    It sounds like something written by a college freshman for an elective non-STEM course who is trying to reinvent keynesian economics for some odd reason. It is certainly written by people who desperately want to remain stuck in the past century.

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    Ludicus's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Heathen Hammer View Post
    It sounds like something written by a college freshman
    God give me patience, you're talking (ignorant) nonsense with an unbelievable speed.

    Here are the signatories,
    Sébastien Adalid, juriste, professeur à l’Université du Havre
    Michel Aglietta, économiste, professeur à l’Université Paris-Nanterre
    Nacho Alvarez, en charge du secteur Economie à Podemos, professeurassocié à l’Université Autonome de Madrid, Espagne
    Julie Bailleux, politiste, maîtresse de conférence à l’Université Paris 2
    Marija Bartl, juriste, professeure à l’Université d’Amsterdam, Pays-Bas
    Marie-Layre Basilien-Gainche, juriste, professeure à l’Université Lyon 3
    Myriam Benlolo Carabot, professeure de droit à l’Université Paris-Nanterre
    Loïc Blondiaux, politiste, professeur à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Karolina Borońska, politiste, Universitéde Wroclaw, Pologne
    Andreas Botsch, syndicaliste, conseiller spécial du président du syndicat à laDeutscher Gewerkschaftsbund (DGB),Allemagne
    Patrick Boucheron, historien, professeur au Collège de France
    Manon Bouju, économiste
    Emmanuel Bouju, professeur à la Sorbonne Nouvelle et membre de l’InstitutUniversitaire de France
    Begnina Boza-Kiss, chercheuseà l’International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis deVienne, Autriche
    Hauke Brunkhorst, sociologue, professeur de sociologie, Université de Flensburg, Allemagne
    Bojan Bugarič, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Ljubljana, Slovénie
    Klaus Busch, professeur à l’Université d’Osnabrück, Allemagne
    Julia Cagé, économiste professeure à Sciences Po Paris
    Véronique Champeil Desplats, professeure de droit à l’Université de Paris-Nanterre
    Lucas Chancel, économiste, co-directeur du World InequalityLab
    Christophe Charle, historien, professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Sorbonne
    Christian Chavagneux, éditorialiste à Alternatives Économiques
    Denis Cogneau, économiste, professeur associé à l’École d’Économie de Paris(PSE)
    Amandine Crespy, politiste, professeure à l’Université de Bruxelles, Belgique
    Massimo D’Alema, ancien premier ministre italien
    Fabio De Masi, député au Bundestag, Die Linke, Allemagne
    Boaventura De Sousa Santos, sociologue, professeur à l’Université de Coimbra, Portugal
    Anne-Laure Delatte, économiste, chargée de recherche au CNRS
    Gabriele Della Morte, juriste, professeur associé à l’Université Catholique deMilan, Italie
    Donatella Della Porta, politiste, professeure à l’École Normale supérieure deFlorence, Italie
    Yves Deloye, politiste, professeur à Sciences Po Bordeaux
    Paul Dermine, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Maastricht, Pays-Bas
    Brigitte Dormont, professeure à l’Université Paris Dauphine
    Guillaume Duval, éditorialiste à Alternatives Économiques
    Susanne Elsen, sociologue, professeurà l’Université Libre de Bolzano, Italie
    Cristina Faciaben, Secretary ofInternational and Cooperation CCOO
    Olivier Faure, député et premiersecrétaire du Parti socialiste
    Emanuele Ferragina, sociologue, professeur à Sciences Po Paris
    Bastien François, président de la Fondation de l’écologie politique,professeur à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Philippe Frémeaux, éditorialiste à Alternatives Économiques
    Diane Fromage, politiste, professeur associé à l’Université deMaastricht, Pays-Bas
    Miguel Gotor, historien, ancien sénateur du Partito Démocratico et Articolo 1-Mdp, Italie
    Julien Grenet, économiste, professeur associé à l’École d’Économie de Paris
    Ulrike Guérot, politiste, professeure à l’Université du Danube, Autriche
    Gabor Halmai, juriste, professeur à l’Institut Universitaire Européen deFlorence, Italie
    Pierre-Cyrille Hautcoeur, économiste, directeur d’étude à l’EGESS et professeur à PSE
    Stéphanie Hennette, juriste, professeure à l’Université deParis-Nanterre
    Rudolf Hickel, économiste, professeur à l’Université de Brème, Allemagne
    Mario Hübler, secrétaire général de la fondation ItalianiEuropei, Italie
    Peter Huber, Élise Huillery, économiste, professeure à l’Université Paris-Dauphine
    Simon Ilse, membre Fondation Heinrich Böll Stiftung, Allemagne
    Liora Israel, sociologue, maîtresse de conférence en sociologie à l’EHESS
    Michael Jacobs, économiste, professeur à l’Université de Sheffield, Royaume Uni
    Yannick Jadot, député européen Europe Écologie Les Verts
    Luis Jimena Quesada, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Valence, Espagne, et ancien président du Comité Européen desDroits Sociaux
    Christian Joerges, professeur de droit à la Hertie School à Berlin, Allemagne
    Kädtler Jürgen, SoziologischesForschungsinstitut Göttingen (SOFI),professeur de sociologie Georg-August-Universität, Allemagne
    Iphigénie Kamtsidou, juriste, professeure à l’Université de Thessaloniqueet présidente du Centre national pour l’administration publique et legouvernement local, Grèce
    Jakob Kapeller, économiste, directeur de l’Institut for Comprehensive Analysis ofthe Economy, Université Johannes Kepler de Linz, Autriche
    Pascale Laborier, politiste, professeure à l’Université Paris-Nanterre
    Justine Lacroix, politiste, professeure à l’Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgique
    Sylvie Lambert, directrice de recherches à l’INRA
    Camille Landais, économiste, professeur à la London Schoolof Economics,Royaume Uni
    Sandra Laugier, philosophe, professeure à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Didier Le Bret, diplomate
    Arnaud Lechevalier, économiste,maître de conférence à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Rémi Lefebvre, politiste, professeur à l’Université de Lille
    Steffen Lehndorff, économiste, research fellow àl’Institut travail et qualification, université de Duisburg-Essen, Allemagne
    Nicolas Leron, politiste, chercheur associé au Centre d’études européennes deSciences Po Paris
    Ulrike Liebert, politiste, professeureà Brème, Allemagne
    Pascal Lokiec, juriste, professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne
    Philippe Maddalon, juriste, professeur à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Mikael Madsen, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Copenhague, Danemark
    Paul Magnette, maire de Charleroi, membre du parti socialiste belge
    Maria Malatesta, historienne, professeure à l’Université de Bologne, Italie
    Francesco Martucci, juriste, professeur à l’Université Paris 2
    Frédérique Matonti, politiste, professeure à l’Université Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Dominique Meda, sociologue, professeure à l’Université Paris Dauphine
    Robert Menasse, écrivain, traducteur et essayiste autrichien
    Wolfgang Merkel, politiste, professeur au Wissenschaftszentrum Berlinfor Sozialforschung(WZB), Allemagne
    Sophie Meunier, politiste, directrice du programme Europe à l’Université dePrinceton, États-Unis
    Zoltan Miklosi, politiste, professeur à l’Université d’Europe Centrale deBudapest, Hongrie
    Eric Millard, professeur de droit à l’Université Paris-Nanterre
    Robert Misik, journaliste et écrivain autrichien
    Éric Monnet, économiste, enseignant associé à l’École d’Économie de Paris
    Alberto Montero, député Podemos et professeur d’économie associé à l’Université deMalaga, Espagne
    Daniel Mouchard, politiste, professeur à l’Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle
    Ulrich Mückenberger, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Brème, Allemagne
    Jan-Wener Muller, politiste, professeur à l’Université de Princeton, États-Unis
    Olivier Nay, politiste professeur à Paris 1-Sorbonne
    Sighard Neckel, professeur à l’Université de Hambourg, Allemagne
    Fernanda Nicola, juriste, professeure à l’American Universityde Washington, États-Unis
    Silke Ötsch, sociologue, Priv.-Doz., Innsbruck, Autriche
    Walter Ötsch, économiste, professeur d’économie, Institut d’économie, Cusanus Hochschule,Allemagne
    Bruno Palier, politiste, directeur de recherche au CNRS, Sciences PoParis
    Mazarine Pingeot, écrivaine et professeure à l’Université Paris 8
    Martin Pigeon, chercheur militant au CEO (CorporateEuropean Observatory),Belgique
    Thomas Piketty, économiste, directeur d’études à l’EHESS
    Sébastien Platon, juriste, professeur à l’Université de Bordeaux
    Thomas Porcher, économiste
    Christophe Prochasson, historien, président de l’Ecole des hautes études ensciences sociales
    Thomas Ribemont, président d’Action Contre la Faim
    Julie Ringelheim, juriste, professeure à l’Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgique
    Daniel Roche, historien, professeur au Collège de France
    Pierre Rosanvallon, historien, professeur au Collège de France
    Ruth Rubio Marin, juriste, professeure à l’Université de Séville, Espagne
    Guillaume Sacriste, politiste, maître de conférences à l’Université Paris1-Sorbonne
    Emmanuel Saez, économiste, professeur à l’Université de Berkeley, États-Unis
    Gisele Sapiro, sociologue, directrice d’études à l’EHESS et directrice derecherche au CNRS
    Francesco Saraceno, économiste, directeur de recherche à l’OFCE, Sciences Po Paris
    Thomas Sauer, économiste, membre d’ATTAC Allemagne, professeur à la Ernst-Abbe-Hochschule de Jena, Allemagne
    Patrick Savidan, co-fondateur de l’Observatoire des inégalités et professeur dephilosophie politique a l’Université Paris-Est Créteil
    Frédéric Sawicki, politiste, professeur à l’Université Paris 1Panthéon-Sorbonne
    Sabrina Schulz, policy fellow duProgressive Zentrum, Allemagne
    Axel Schäffer, député SPD, membre de la commission Europe du Bundestag, Allemagne

    ---
    Quote Originally Posted by Heathen Hammer View Post
    we are all stuck in this corrupt "representative democracy" oligarchy
    Even Greece has given up the direct democracy.And we don't want a dictatorship of the proletariat. There are two forms of combination of participatory and representative democracy: coexistence and complementary.Participatory at the local level, and representative at national level. Complementary implies a profound articulation between representative democracy and participatory democracy.Obviously, it implies the recognition by the government that participatory proceduralism can substitute parts of the process of representation and deliberation.
    Il y a quelque chose de pire que d'avoir une âme perverse. C’est d'avoir une âme habituée
    Charles Péguy

    Every human society must justify its inequalities: reasons must be found because, without them, the whole political and social edifice is in danger of collapsing”.
    Thomas Piketty

  10. #10

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by EmperorBatman999 View Post
    It largely comes from the fact that Europe is weak on its own.
    Woah woah woah, they wouldn't like that answer.

    Not only that, but in a USA vs. Europe war, they'll win, according to them. Heck I've even read that Britain could do it on their own, according to the British, which begs the question the question why they haven't declared war yet.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Heathen Hammer View Post
    we are not that different
    Not according to the Europeans and Canadians I've been talking to.

    They say they are far superior to the US and one day Europa will regain their lost glory and will crush the USA and any who stands in their way, and they will build a better world.

  12. #12
    antaeus's Avatar Cool and normal
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Not according to the Europeans and Canadians I've been talking to.

    They say they are far superior to the US and one day Europa will regain their lost glory and will crush the USA and any who stands in their way, and they will build a better world.
    Exactly what percentage of Europeans and Canadians have you been polling for opinions on which to base your view?

    I suspect your sample may not be representative of mainstream opinion in Europe towards the US. Real views are complex depending on the topic, but not overly negative.
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    conon394's Avatar hoi polloi
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Not according to the Europeans and Canadians I've been talking to.
    You sure you are not wandering into a Women or Men's world ice hokey forum? Where the former is true and the Latter is coin toss.

    They say they are far superior to the US and one day Europa will regain their lost glory and will crush the USA and any who stands in their way, and they will build a better world.
    Given population trends and military spending and lack of a actual federal structure seems fairly fringe dreaming again perhaps you are talking to people writing AH. Europe needed to really take a pass on WW1 (and thus WW2) for you ambition to be real.
    IN PATROCINIVM SVB Dromikaites

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    But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in battle, shall join together at the latter day and cry all 'We died at such a place; some swearing, some crying for surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left.

    Hyperides of Athens: We know, replied he, that Antipater is good, but we (the Demos of Athens) have no need of a master at present, even a good one.

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    EmperorBatman999's Avatar I say, what, what?
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Woah woah woah, they wouldn't like that answer.

    Not only that, but in a USA vs. Europe war, they'll win, according to them. Heck I've even read that Britain could do it on their own, according to the British, which begs the question the question why they haven't declared war yet.
    I'm not sure if you're serious. Who is "them," the Europeans? Furthermore, what sort of Brit would ever entertain the idea of going to war with America? If anything, for Britain, the only countries for it to turn to now are the rest of the Anglosphere, including the United States, when it comes to international trade and multilateral civil and military cooperation. This also doesn't even consider that Britain no longer considers itself part of Europe anyway, and that at least since the Napoleonic Wars, they have recognized themselves to be separate from Europe to a certain degree.

    Finally, we need to simply regard frank truths here that Europe could not stand to any other superpower alone. I have highlighted that it is too decentralized and lacks a common army. Furthermore, the roadmap to getting to a federalized European government and army is quite lengthy, even without British interference into Brussels's integration schemes. There are two many issues of sovereignty at stake, and we already see the minor Member States digging their heels in to protest growing encroachment of the European Council, which pretty much serves to issue French and German Diktats to the rest of the members.

    How would Europe make a Common Army? What would be the language of command? One country would be the big winner (I reckon France) while all other countries would be the loser, forced to learn. But even the matter of command language wouldn't solve communication problems, as the mishaps of the Austro-Hungarian Army attest. How would you compile, include, and respect the distinct military traditions of all the Member States' armies? You would need to consider everything from command structure, tactical doctrine, to the way soldiers salute their CO.
    Last edited by EmperorBatman999; January 14, 2022 at 04:19 PM.

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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Based on almost everything I read about the US, from the Europeans perspective, everything the US does is wrong, it's evil, it's self centered blah blah blah blah.
    OMG did they just assume the USA's gender?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    If that is so, why doesn't Europe sever their alliance and all their treaties with the US, the same goes for Britain, and just go their own way? Wouldn't that be easier than having to argue with another country on what to do and how to do things?
    If.

    LMAO this is a silly thread.

    If OP is an example of how the US thinks about how Europe thinks about the US why don't well all just hope on a flight to Moscow and marry Vladimir Putin? Hmmm? Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm?
    Jatte lambastes Calico Rat

  16. #16

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Based on almost everything I read about the US, from the Europeans perspective, everything the US does is wrong, it's evil, it's self centered blah blah blah blah.

    If that is so, why doesn't Europe sever their alliance and all their treaties with the US, the same goes for Britain, and just go their own way? Wouldn't that be easier than having to argue with another country on what to do and how to do things?
    -Because international trade is a thing.

    -Because multinational corporations needing to easily do business in the US and Europe is a thing.

    -Because pointlessly antagonizing the US would gain them nothing.

    -Because that would make them easy prey for China.

    -Because that would make them easy prey for Russia.

    -Because most people in the world just want to get by and aren't looking to start a war.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    why don't well all just hope on a flight to Moscow and marry Vladimir Putin?
    You know that's actually a good idea, but are you really going to do that?

  18. #18
    conon394's Avatar hoi polloi
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    You know that's actually a good idea, but are you really going to do that?
    You have of course now seriously dodged all the serious replies to your questions.
    IN PATROCINIVM SVB Dromikaites

    'One day when I fly with my hands - up down the sky, like a bird'

    But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in battle, shall join together at the latter day and cry all 'We died at such a place; some swearing, some crying for surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left.

    Hyperides of Athens: We know, replied he, that Antipater is good, but we (the Demos of Athens) have no need of a master at present, even a good one.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    Based on almost everything I read about the US, from the Europeans perspective, everything the US does is wrong, it's evil, it's self centered blah blah blah blah.
    Almost everything you hear about America from European media and about Europe from American media is dogshit. Unless you go full historian mode and force yourself to analyse every bit of news and read between the lines (which is exhausting and time-consuming), you can't consider yourself informed by consuming legacy media alone (or even unofficial or "politically incorrect" media, which is also unreliable).
    What you read there is not representative of what the totality of the population thinks, or even the governments. Just the more or less terrible takes of media people and the upper middle class those media people tend to come from. If you want to truly understand the countries on the other side of the pond, you'd have travel there and/or to get to know some of their citizens personally, and consume media items that are not infused with politics somehow.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ashton2434 View Post
    It does if Europe's goal is to bring back the glory days when they were masters.
    Why would you even assume that - with the possible exception of Boris Johnson, nobody in Europe wants that. Even the most ardent ethnic nationalists from Europe just want to be left alone by the rest of the world.

  20. #20
    swabian's Avatar igni ferroque
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    Default Re: Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?

    Why doesn't Europe just severtheir alliance with the US if they disagree with everything the US does?
    Because then wen don't get to annoy them so easily anymore =D

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