Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

  1. #1

    Default A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Hi EB 2 team,

    I've been a long-time fan of Europa Barbarorum, from back in the day before the 1.0 release of EB 1, even. I have to admit that the mod was very inspirational for me, personally. I made a video review of EB 2 and put it up on YouTube, and I'm going to be doing a Let's Play that showcases all of the brilliant mechanics of the mod (probably either Koinon Hellenon or Hayastan). I'll put the text of the review in spoilers for those who would prefer to read. Again, thank you for creating this magnificent mod!

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Introduction
    With the release of the original Rome Total War, many fans of the series started to clamor for more historical accuracy from the game. With its Bronze Age Egyptians, flaming pigs, bright pink Parthians in pajamas, and “Spain” being the name of a faction in a game that starts in 270 BC, many history buffs went into a frenzy, demanding a greater adherence to historical truths in order to increase the immersion of the game. After all, how can you feel like a real king of Armenia, if your capital in 270 BC is Artaxata, which was not constructed until approximately one hundred years later? Well, along came Europa Barbarorum 1 to save the day and push the boundaries of how devoted to history a Total War game could be.
    Europa Barbarorum 2 is the successor to Europa Barbarorum 1, and it shows in almost every way. The soundtrack is essentially the same, many of the graphics are the same, many of the loading screens are the same, and the overall atmosphere is very similar, despite the base game being Medieval 2, a game that is not at all based in the Roman period. Let’s go over all the aspects of Europa Barbarorum 2 one by one and outline why I think it’s the best mod for Medieval 2, and perhaps of all time.
    Unparalleled Dedication to Historicity
    The aesthetic of Europa Barbarorum is very unique. There really isn’t another mod quite like it. You can see this immediately from the faction selection screen – what are these factions? Most of them are in fact factions everyone is aware of – the Kingdom of Macedon is Makedonia, the Romani are the Romans… but those are the easy ones? Who are the Sweboz? Well of course they are the Suebi, one of the German tribes that caused Rome lots of trouble over the course of their history. What is Hayastan? Hayastan is the Armenian word for Armenia (though technically in this time period they probably would have said Hayk instead, but that’s fine). What is the Koinon Hellenon? Well those are the Greek Cities of course. The localized faction names are just the start of the player’s journey into Europa Barbarorum, as those are the only translated terms… once you get into the game and have a look around the campaign map, you will find that pretty much everything is translated into the native language of that faction. Everything down to the agents is translated – so, for example, for Hayastan/Armenia, instead of having a diplomat, you’ll have a Divanaget. All of your units are also translated, and these can be a real doozy, since if your faction (like Hayastan/Armenia in this example) is located in a very multiethnic area, you’ll have units in your army with names that are from Classical Georgian, Classical Armenian, Parthian, Greek, Greek normalizations of foreign words in languages that have been lost… You can get lost in this stuff. And when I was a kid, I did get lost in EB 1, and it was great. It’s great here in EB 2 as well.
    The soundtrack is also excellent in general. The campaign map tracks in particular are quite iconic and some of them have even been done by musicians who specialize in ancient music, the Celtic tracks in particular I believe. It’s really a memorable soundtrack for all cultures. There is one track I don’t like in particular – the eastern battle track. It sounds like a vuvuzela festival along with burly men yelling and is just quite jarring… I understand that lovely music didn’t play during battles historically (until the period of Empire and Napoleon Total War and their hilarious drummers and flute players), but something a little more… listenable would have been preferred here. But in general, excellent soundtrack, very iconic – especially the campaign map tracks. For a mod, the work that has been done in this department is phenomenal.
    Another extremely nice touch is the language mod that they have put in – that is the units don’t speak in stereotypical accented English, but rather in their native language, or at least something close to it. There are language packs for Latin, Greek, Celtic, Parthian, and a few others. Of course, this means that some factions unfortunately use a language pack that isn’t one hundred percent appropriate, such as the Saka Rauka, or Hayastan that uses the Parthian language pack, but such things are unavoidable in a mod of this magnitude.
    The part of the game that has no doubt received the largest facelift is the campaign map. I’m not only referring to the map itself here, which has indeed been changed significantly, but I’m also talking about the mechanics. The map feels very alive in Europa Barbarorum 2. There are many small towns and other new pieces on the campaign map that flesh it out quite a bit. Both the campaign map cities and the battle map cities have been completely redone and they truly look unique. Every culture has very appropriate battle map models for their towns and they make you feel like you’re fighting against (or for) that culture, rather than a more generic settlement.
    Pretty much everything in the game comes with a historical explanation and description. Almost every single province has a quote unquote building that is just there to provide the historical background of that province to the player. Almost every faction character at the start of the game begins with a “biography” trait that gives the player all he needs to know about that person. Every year you get a scroll entitled “This Year in History” that gives you the rundown of most of the major historical events that took place in that year. It’s just great.
    All of these elements combined really make Europa Barbarorum 2 stand out aesthetically. Now, let’s get into the gameplay mechanics of the mod.
    The Campaign
    The area where Europa Barbarorum 2 truly shines from a gameplay perspective is in its campaign. In terms of the campaign gameplay, you have to know your history in order to succeed, or else you have to learn quickly. This is especially true if you’re playing a more difficult faction, like a small tribe or kingdom. One of the major improvements to the campaign map here is to the minor factions, which in colloquial terminology are called slaves or generic rebels in Rome 1 and Medieval 2, since every province couldn’t have a specific faction in that game engine. This, in my opinion, was one of the biggest limitations of the games based on this engine and was a real immersion killer, since it removes a lot of possibilities and factors in the campaign, since huge swaths of the map are just generic rebels that everyone is at war with and can never do diplomacy with. These generic rebels also tend to be real pushovers that don’t build up or go on the offensive. This is not so in Europa Barbarorum 2. While you can’t have diplomacy with the “rebel” provinces and they aren’t exactly as active as major factions, they can wield significant power in EB 2 and even go on the offensive at times. Of course, all of this is dependent on the historical situation in that area. For a faction like the Aedui, a Gaulish tribe, you have a small settlement, Bibracte, where you start from, and the other settlements near you represent other tribes. These rebels are not as strong as some others on the map, since they weren’t exactly kingdoms in their structure, but rather just tribes like your own Aedui.
    Using Hayastan again as an example, the situation is very different from a faction like the Aedui. Historically, in this time period, 272 BC, Armenia was ruled by the Yervanduni Dynasty (the Orontid Dynasty in Greek) and was a sort of Achaemenid successor state, similar to the situation in Pontus. The Yervanduni dynasts were kings, minted coins, and used writing (in a somewhat limited way, perhaps mostly Aramaic and Greek on perishable materials). Utilizing data about the ethnic and tribal makeup of the landscape of the region from sources such as Xenophon and Strabo, we know that the area was very diverse, with many different tribes and groups. We also know that the following dynasty, the Artaxiads, faced several internal issues based on internal divisions and spent a lot of time trying to reform and centralize the kingdom to a greater degree. Thus, in Europa Barbarorum 2, you have the Yervanduni dynasty ruling a sort of tribal kingdom, which is reflected in game as a building that represents the structure of your government. Hayastan had a rocky relationship with their southern neighbor, the Seleucid Empire aka the Grey Death, in that time period, and was often forced to pay tribute if wars didn’t go their way. Thus, at the start of the game, similar to the starting situation with Bactria, you have to pay a tribute of 3000 gold every turn in order to maintain good relations with the Seleucids. Once you’re prepared and ready to fight them, you can stop the payments and the Seleucids will respond with violence. This is a Total War game after all. However, this is not the only issue facing your burgeoning kingdom in Europa Barbarorum 2. There were several other kingdoms in a similar situation in 272 BC. To the southeast, you have the kingdom of Media Atropatene, which was another pretty powerful Achaemenid successor state type kingdom. While they are not a major faction in the game, they are represented by a rich province and around 3 powerful armies that will defend their city and attack when they deem it necessary. To the west, you have the kingdom of Armenia Minor, with its capital at Ani-Kamakh, which is still strong, but not as strong as Media Atropatene. To the north, you have the Caucasian kingdoms of Colchis and Caucasian Iberia, or Egrisi and Kartli in the game. To the northeast, you have the smaller, less developed land of Caucasian Albania, or Aghvank in the game. You yourself are pretty comparable in power to Media Atropatene, but since you are surrounded by a group of fairly developed kingdoms at the start, your best bet for quick expansion is Aghvank, since they have the least developed kingdom of the bunch. Also, since the kingdom of Kartli also had an agreement with the Seleucids historically, an attack on them will not be viewed very kindly by your southern Seleucid neighbors. Basically, if you know your history, you can make more logically sound decisions on the campaign map. This increases the campaign immersion quite a bit, in my opinion.
    Going to the west, let me use the Koinon Hellenon, the Greek Cities, as another example. Of course, like in vanilla Rome Total War, there was no unified state called the Greek Cities – it is a representation of a possible “league” or alliance of the independent Greek Cities, which is basically a good gameplay mechanic that acts as a counterbalance to the more powerful Kingdom of Macedon. However, Europa Barbarorum 2 does far more than vanilla Rome Total War did to make this faction feel like a league of cities. You have several families that represent the various leaders of various city-states, such as Athens, Sparta, etc. You also have access to different units in different cities, adding to the hodge-podge nature of the Koinon Hellenon faction and campaign. It’s quite a fun compromise between the completely ahistorical and immersion-breaking “Greek Cities” of vanilla Rome and the fully separate Greek factions in other mods such as Roma Surrectum 2, which has Sparta as a separate faction, for example. Europa Barbarorum 2 combines them, but does its best to make them feel as diverse as possible, as if the player was really leading a bunch of different factions. But how does this work later on in the campaign? How would a loose confederation of city-states go off and conquer the entire Mediterranean? Well, this leads me to the next major aspect of the campaign map gameplay – the reforms.
    Every faction in the game has “reforms” that give it access to new units, buildings, etc. Not every faction gets %100 unique reforms – there are certain groups of factions that receive the same or very similar reforms, such as the Hellenistic factions and the Celtic factions. Of course, there are factions that receive unique reforms that are only for that faction, such as the Lugiones, the Koinon Hellenon, Hayastan, Rome, Pahlava/Parthia, etc. These reforms are the in-game representations of the historical development these factions went through over the period of time that the EB 2 campaign covers.
    Taking Hayastan as an example again – you start out with 2 cities that have the Caucasian Tribal Kingdom building constructed. In order to advance to the next tier of the reforms, you have to construct this building in four additional neighboring settlements. This expands the unit roster and allows for the construction of higher-tier native colonies and government buildings. This represents the kingdom’s historical development from a minor Achaemenid successor state kingdom to a regional kingdom in its own right. In conjunction to this, you have to reject the annual tribute to the Seleucids and win several battles against them (in addition to taking several settlements) in order to break away from this diplomatic arrangement. Eventually, after taking several more settlements including some specific ones, you can construct the imperial government building. After this there is a second reform that can trigger based on different events. You need to have the imperial building constructed in the capital and you can either have a faction leader with 8 authority, a faction leader with 6 authority in conjunction with having at least 15 settlements, or have at least 21 settlements to trigger this second reform. In addition to all this, there are even other paths you can take. For example, if you’ve chosen to fight the Seleucids, but you feel as if your kingdom is tired out after you’ve won 6 battles and taken 2 settlements, you can agree to be forgiven, keep the new settlements and renew the old arrangement of paying annual tribute. All of this does an amazing job in terms of immersing the player, since there are so many stories to be written in every single campaign for every single faction
    Going back to the Greek Cities, another good example of the reforms are those for the Koinon Hellenon. The reforms emphasize that you are initially leading a loose coalition of various city-states, and are tied to having different state leaders, which are represented by traits in the game. You can have an Archon of Athens who represents the leader of Athens, an Archon of Ambrakia, representing the leader of Ambrakia, etc. I don’t want to go through the Koinon Hellenon reforms in great detail as I did for Hayastan above, but the reforms here represent how the coalition develops throughout the campaign. Eventually, it culminates in the sympoliteia, or a treaty where Greek cities agree to for all intents and purposes merge. This is what you strive for when taking command of the Koinon Hellenon.
    Needless to say, the reforms mechanic in the campaign is great for immersion and really helps create a narrative storyline that is centered not only around your characters, but also the development of your faction as a whole. Going through the whole reform process for a given faction can be a real achievement and really draws the player in. You can find a link to the guide to the unique reforms for every faction in the description below.
    Every single building in Europa Barbarorum 2 has a purpose. I have seen others review the game and some have even complained about buildings doing nothing. This couldn’t be further from the truth. In LegendofTotalWar’s video about EB2, he takes a look at the mines building in Italy and sees that the income he’ll get from those is pitiful, and then concludes that the mines in EB2 are useless. However, this varies drastically from province to province. Using the Armavir province as an example, the capital province of Hayastan, you begin the campaign with a basic mines building already constructed and you get over 1000 or perhaps even about 2000 gold per turn from this building, whereas the one in that Italian province gave a pittance in comparison and wasn’t worth constructing. It just depends of the province, and this also adds to the immersion. You don’t just get a ton of money and build everything like in vanilla Rome Total War or Medieval 2. I find this to be refreshing in a Total War game.
    The trait system in EB 2 is also similar to the one in EB 1 and also adds a lot to the campaign and the battles. Every character really gets fleshed out here, since they have traits for being the king, the governor of somewhere, an experienced cavalryman, etc. Everyone also has a few traits they start out with that kind of predetermine what they will be good at. For example, you can have someone who starts out with the Dull trait. You can already tell from this that he won’t be very good at management and he should focus his efforts on his other skills, especially if he has a hardy constitution. Your characters gain traits based on these basic ones, but they also gain traits and ancillaries based on the buildings of the city they are in (for example, they can get some nice traits and ancillaries from educational buildings or temple complexes), or from how they perform in battles. This dynamic traits system, that has been enhanced to a degree not seen in many other mods is another way that EB 2 really stands out.
    The Battles
    Battles in Europa Barbarorum 2 are fairly good, but I wouldn’t call them outstanding, especially when compared to other mods that have a greater focus on battles. They are good, don’t get me wrong. The units look great and there is a lot of strategy involved. You pretty much have to hold your battle line, skirmish and flank with your cavalry, and pepper the enemy with rocks, arrows and javelins as much as you can. It’s your standard Rome Total War fare. I have actually seen the Battle AI freak out sometimes, especially in field battles, but it really isn’t that surprising for Total War battle AI to freak out at times. I just explain it away by them having a bad chain of command or a poor general or being over-eager soldiers. Every battle also has a greater meaning here, since units are expensive and it isn’t easy to just replenish your troops with a snap of your fingers. You have to choose your fights wisely. I also appreciate the diversity of the units here. Most armies in this period were not uniform, similar looking troops. There were many auxiliary tribesmen from cultures we know little to nothing about, units didn’t all wear the same thing… things were pretty messy. Europa Barbarorum 2 depicts this to a tee, and while it does make managing large battles a bit of a headache at times, depending on the faction of course, it really should be tough to manage them! This also adds to the immersion in game. Again, the battles are good, and there are some amazing units in the mod, it’s just not the best mod for someone who plays Total War primarily for the battles.
    Conclusion
    I could keep talking about Europa Barbarorum and its impact on me forever, but I think I will try to wrap things up here. In my opinion, Europa Barbarorum 1 and 2 stand above the other mods for Rome and Medieval 2 for me, due to their absolute unwavering devotion to historical accuracy. The way that EB 2 represents so many aspects of the history of every single faction, character, and province in game is simply unmatched by any other mod for any Total War. For all of the reasons outline in this review, I give Europa Barbarorum 2 5 stars out of 5. Some may feel like the campaign is a slog or that the battles are not as clean as those in other mods, but for me, in my humble opinion, Europa Barbarorum 2 is the mod to end all mods and it’s my absolute favorite mod for any Total War game ever made. It’s just too bad the Rome and Medieval 2 engines get older and less compatible with newer systems every year…


    Under the patronage of John I Tzimisces

  2. #2
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    3,950

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Great review (even though I'd recon some 0.01% of the players would even know the very existence of Artaxata or Armavira, let alone the time difference between them ;-).

    I've included this link in the OP advising the players which mod to play.
    If you want to play a historical mod in the medieval setting the best are:
    the Stainless Steel Historical Improvement Project,
    and the Broken Crescent + Buff and Shine.
    ........................................................................................................................................
    Reviews of the mods (all made in 2018): SSHIP, Wrath of the Norsemen, Broken Crescent.
    Home rules for playing a game without exploiting the M2TW engine deficiencies.
    Medieval 2 hints for moders: forts, merchants, AT-NGB bug.
    Thrones of Britannia: review, opinion on the battles, ideas for modding. No good mod yet, alas!
    Dominant strategy in Rome 2 TW and Attila TW: “Sniping groups of armies”. Still there, alas!
    .................................................................................................................................................................................
    Developer of the SSHIP: traits, ancillaries, script fixing, guides, historical improvements

  3. #3

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    KH is a big dish to eat through, so much I kinda gave up writing a complete guide for the traits (it is usable in its current state). However if you need any tips and strats to optimize through a trait line, just hit me up here and I will be glad to help. Also, I strongly encourage you to strongly encourage whoever is watching to learn how to read the descr text files. That will allow for much more informed decisions that, in my opinion, makes the mod much more enjoyable to play.

  4. #4

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    The music is an iconic part of the EB mods. The age of fragmentation and tracks for the nomadic factions are what got me into EB 1.


    Although I'll have to replay Apeiros when the patch 2.4 comes. As of 2.35 it's a fairly generic Hellenic kingdom with the Italian recrutation bonuses.
    Last edited by Satapatiš; July 23, 2020 at 09:10 AM.
    Furthermore, I believe that Rome must be destroyed.


  5. #5

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Satapatiš View Post
    The music is an iconic part of the EB mods. The age of fragmentation and tracks for the nomadic factions are what got me into EB 1.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwufEEa2pIA

    As youtube is not working right... Melody of Ruin is my favorite song in the mod.
    Last edited by RodriguesSting; July 23, 2020 at 09:22 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by RodriguesSting View Post
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwufEEa2pIA

    As youtube is not working right... Melody of Ruin is my favorite song in the mod.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GrdwjUZvlQ

    When you pick a faction to play basing it only on their music tracks.
    Furthermore, I believe that Rome must be destroyed.


  7. #7

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Although the historical accuracy issues of Rome one are very well known, with time, they kinda grew to be iconic. Other than the egyptians, I kinda enjoy the more ridiculous elements. Roman ninjas and gladiator armies, dog garrisons, celts throwing heads and german berserkers that were thrice as big as the other models, etc. Better bad than forgettable I say.

  8. #8

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by RodriguesSting View Post
    Although the historical accuracy issues of Rome one are very well known, with time, they kinda grew to be iconic. Other than the egyptians, I kinda enjoy the more ridiculous elements. Roman ninjas and gladiator armies, dog garrisons, celts throwing heads and german berserkers that were thrice as big as the other models, etc. Better bad than forgettable I say.
    Screeching women. You forgot the screeching women.
    Furthermore, I believe that Rome must be destroyed.


  9. #9

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    Great review (even though I'd recon some 0.01% of the players would even know the very existence of Artaxata or Armavira, let alone the time difference between them ;-).
    thanks for noticing the deadpan joke about Artaxata!


    I've included this link in the OP advising the players which mod to play.
    Thanks! It's been quite awhile since I wrote a lot on TWC, looking to do some more write-ups/videos soon now that I'm back and have time to experience some more historically accurate mods.
    Under the patronage of John I Tzimisces

  10. #10

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    I felt in love with those sarmatian soundtracks and can't read a book about the steppe without them in the background

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgCo...&index=26&t=0s
    Last edited by blackbirdgriffin; July 23, 2020 at 01:06 PM.

  11. #11
    Lusitanio's Avatar Content Staff
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    1,192

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    A wonderful review Drtad! I just hope you have the stomach to do another one when the new patch comes out since it will add soo much new content to the mod
    Last edited by Lusitanio; July 24, 2020 at 05:18 AM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by blackbirdgriffin View Post
    I felt in love with those sarmatian soundtracks and can't read a book about the steppe without them in the background

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgCo...&index=26&t=0s
    I loved this one in my Sarmatian campaign. Oddly enough, it sounds like acoustic black metal to me, with all these tremolo pickings!

    Nice review! I agree that EBII is really immersive, I often get lost reading the descriptions and listening to the music. But I do think that the battles are great. The low kill rate and the superb battle models make it for me, even if the AI can be quite dumb (as in all TW games). For me, it's indeed the best TW mod.

  13. #13

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Satapatiš View Post
    Screeching women. You forgot the screeching women.
    It's the second time I read about the screeching women, who were them?

  14. #14

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by makute View Post
    It's the second time I read about the screeching women, who were them?
    Screeching Women were a German unit from the original Rome Total War. They sport an absurdly high attack but have next to no defenses. Where they really shine though is their screech ability, which raises the morale of allies and penalizes the morale of enemies. It was about as realistic as the 9 foot tall berserkers.

  15. #15

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Satapatiš View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GrdwjUZvlQ

    When you pick a faction to play basing it only on their music tracks.
    Back in the day when I played EB1 I used to turn this song on blast for the entertainment of my then gf.

    If I owned a car with powerful speakers, I would play a bass-booted version of this with the windows down.
    Last edited by Krampus; July 23, 2020 at 10:39 PM.

  16. #16

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Lusitanio View Post
    A wonderful review Drtad! As just hope you have the stomach to do another one when the new patch comes out since it will add soo much new content to the mod
    On the contrary - looking forward to it! I'll be sure to update my thoughts (and add a section on the AoR recruitment system).

    KH is a big dish to eat through, so much I kinda gave up writing a complete guide for the traits (it is usable in its current state). However if you need any tips and strats to optimize through a trait line, just hit me up here and I will be glad to help. Also, I strongly encourage you to strongly encourage whoever is watching to learn how to read the descr text files. That will allow for much more informed decisions that, in my opinion, makes the mod much more enjoyable to play.nd use other factions as examples.
    I'm thinking more and more about doing a KH campaign and a sort of video walkthrough of how to do the KH reforms over the course of the campaign, so this might be super helpful...
    Under the patronage of John I Tzimisces

  17. #17
    QuintusSertorius's Avatar EBII Hod Carrier
    Artifex

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,759

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Satapatiš View Post
    Although I'll have to replay Apeiros when the patch 2.4 comes. As of 2.35 it's a fairly generic Hellenic kingdom with the Italian recrutation bonuses.
    Epeiros is definitely not "north-western Makedonia" in the patch.

  18. #18

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by Drtad View Post
    I'm thinking more and more about doing a KH campaign and a sort of video walkthrough of how to do the KH reforms over the course of the campaign, so this might be super helpful...
    I think the reforms are pretty easy to accomplish. What's kinda gnarly is to make sure your characters will be the best possible and still usable as governors and generals. Luckily KH government tend to boost public order all around, reducing, even if slightly, the effects of the terrible personality trait Hellenics get.

  19. #19

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Yeah I'm pretty excited about 2.4. Been playing EB mods on and off for a decade now and I never get bored.

    I'm doing a run of TW3K with the Beneath a Red Sky mod to make battles more realistic to tide me over. I really like that you can see the range of ranged units, the skill system for generals, the reform tree, and the fact that you can control more than 20 units on a battlefield at once when you have reinforcements But the recruitment and replenishment system is trash. When you kill a unit, it should die. The enemy should have to retrain them, and should not just be able to spam elites. Also, the recall and recruit system allows you to teleport entire armies across the map. Which is stupid. And, unmodded, the base game is an arcade-style slaughterfest.

    EB2's trait system is a work of art, as are the hundreds of unit models. And because of the AOR and unit recruitment differences between factions, it actually feels like different parts of the campaign map represent different regions of the world. The only thing that would make this game better is if CA updated the API for M2TW to play better on newer hardware, like Feral did for iOS.

    When I sell my RTX 2080 to save for one of the new GPUs coming out this fall, I'm probably going to start a campaign as the Boii, Bosporus, or Pergamon and play on integrated graphics.

  20. #20

    Default Re: A Review of EB 2 from a Long-Time Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by RodriguesSting View Post
    I think the reforms are pretty easy to accomplish. What's kinda gnarly is to make sure your characters will be the best possible and still usable as governors and generals. Luckily KH government tend to boost public order all around, reducing, even if slightly, the effects of the terrible personality trait Hellenics get.
    That's true. It could be overwhelming for a new player, though, especially someone not that familiar with the history of the time. I have noticed that it is tough to get really good characters, but the KH economy becomes really strong after taking just a province or two so that does offset that. It is tough getting the hang of all the Greek traits, but after reading up a bit it becomes pretty self-explanatory. Just have to remember to check the trait updates and keep as good a track of that stuff as possible.

    Yeah I'm pretty excited about 2.4. Been playing EB mods on and off for a decade now and I never get bored.
    The campaigns for each faction are just so varied (moreso than any other mod imo).

    I'm doing a run of TW3K with the Beneath a Red Sky mod to make battles more realistic to tide me over. I really like that you can see the range of ranged units, the skill system for generals, the reform tree, and the fact that you can control more than 20 units on a battlefield at once when you have reinforcements But the recruitment and replenishment system is trash. When you kill a unit, it should die. The enemy should have to retrain them, and should not just be able to spam elites. Also, the recall and recruit system allows you to teleport entire armies across the map. Which is stupid. And, unmodded, the base game is an arcade-style slaughterfest.
    I do like the ability to see the range of my ranged units. Coming back to Med 2 after awhile, it is a bit tough to just adjust back to not being able to track that.

    I think replenishment was fine in Shogun 2/Rome 2/Napoleon - I don't quite grasp what they were going for in 3 Kingdoms just yet. Perhaps I haven't played it enough yet to appreciate the recruitment system (but at the moment I'm not the biggest fan). I really like the story aspect of it though.

    EB2's trait system is a work of art, as are the hundreds of unit models. And because of the AOR and unit recruitment differences between factions, it actually feels like different parts of the campaign map represent different regions of the world. The only thing that would make this game better is if CA updated the API for M2TW to play better on newer hardware, like Feral did for iOS.
    The 4GB ram patch makes it bearable, but it really needs an official compatibility patch...

    When I sell my RTX 2080 to save for one of the new GPUs coming out this fall, I'm probably going to start a campaign as the Boii, Bosporus, or Pergamon and play on integrated graphics.
    I'm using a laptop from 2017 with an i5-7300HQ and an NVIDIA 1050 4gb... At least EB 2 runs great (actually most Total Wars run fine on my system, I've only had a few slowdowns in Attila really)
    Last edited by Drtad; July 26, 2020 at 03:24 AM.
    Under the patronage of John I Tzimisces

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •