Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: Louth Manor, North Carolina

  1. #1
    Lucius Malfoy's Avatar Pure-Blood
    Citizen

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    21,191

    Default Louth Manor, North Carolina


    Family History



    The Cotter, or MacCotter, family are a well-known Irish clan that were founded by Viking descendants in the early 12th century AD. It is believed that they may have had an older ancestor, an Icelander dating to the time of Cnut of England. Whatever the case, the Cotters have remained a prominent family in County Cork. One of their earliest members was an William Cottyr, who flourished during the reign of Edward IV. Another prominent member, Sir James, served Charles II in the effort to restore the monarchy.

    The MacCotters of the Thirteen Colonies came to the Americas during the early 1700s when Queen Anne's War raged between France and Britain. In loyalty for his services, a certain Major Joseph MacCotter was awarded a grant of land, a viable estate, in North Carolina. In 1741, Joseph died and was succeeded, as patriarch, by his eldest son Edward. It is to be noted that both Joseph and Edward are remembered by the Lionheart family as the former was an acquaintance of Arthur I and the latter was a mentor for the young Arthur II during the French and Indian War, starting in 1754. His career came to an end, however, due an accident that occurred during a patrol. Edward was succeeded by his own son, James. At the outbreak of the American Revolution, James would side with the Royalists and command the 2nd American Regiment, also known as the Volunteers of Ireland, throughout much of the war. His career ensured he rose to the rank of Brigadier General, seeing combat at Charleston, Camden, the Siege of Ninety-Six and eventually the Surrender of Yorktown. Though James was made a prisoner of war after Yorktown, his association with the Lionheart family, and the services rendered by his son, Joseph II, who married Arthur II's daughter and fought in the Continental Army, ensured he was neither hanged nor deprived of his land

    After the war, James, along with his son, entered politics. He became one of the leading politicians in centralist policies, participating in the Constitutional Convention, and an advocate of slavery and the slave trade. His son, Joseph, remained in North Carolina as an elected official for the local government there. While the father aimed for federal participation, the son aimed to be governor of his home state. During Shay's Rebellion, the son would return to the military, letting his political career go to fight in the army once more as a cavalry commander.

    A little further information:
    - Joseph II MacCotter is the oldest surviving son of James MacCotter and the middle sibling between his two sisters, Helena and Harriet. Whereas his father joined the Royalists, Joseph is noted to have sided with the Patriots. He was married Henrietta Lionheart in 1775 and would later join the Continental Army in 1777, eventually rising to command the North Carolina Light Dragoons till 1780. His quick rise through the ranks was mainly due to his ties with the Commander-in-Chief, Arthur Lionheart, as well as modest service within the Continental Army. He would later be transferred to command the 4th Continental Light Dragoons till 1783, participating at Yorktown and remaining engagements till the wars end. His highest rank achieved was that of Colonel. His services rendered ensured that his father, James, was released and no consequences were suffered by the family. During a brief few years, he would serve minor political roles within North Carolina, while his father was doing his role in the federal government. In 1786, Joseph returned to the army, leading a command of dragoons from North Carolina, once more, during Shay's Rebellion. After the rebellion, and by 1789, Joseph had re-entered political office and is presently serving his term as Governor of North Carolina.

    Family Tree
    Joseph I MacCotter - b. 1682 and d. 1741
    Edward MacCotter - b. 1711 and d. 1777
    James MacCotter - b. 1733 and d. ???? - Married Emily MacCotter, b. 1743

    Issue of James and Emily MacCotter
    - Helena MacCotter (b. 1768) - Married to Richard Sterling
    - Joseph II MacCotter (b. 1768) - Married to Henrietta Lionheart (b. 1760)
    - Harriet MacCotter (b. 1767) - Married to Richard Harris

    Issue of Joseph II and Henrietta
    - Henry MacCotter b. 1780, twin of Elizabeth
    - Elizabeth MacCotter b. 1780, twin of Henry

    Family Members

    James MacCotter


    James MacCotter in full Brigadier General dress, ca. 1780

    Age: 56 (b. 1733)
    Spouse: Emily née Smith (b. 1743)

    +2 Infantry Command
    +1 Charisma
    +1 Espionage
    +1 Survival

    Heritage
    Scots-Irish: You are the descendant of Scots-Irish, or Ulster Scot, settlers who mainly lived in the interior of the Thirteen Colonies, away from the coast. Your ancestors were likely poor, a consequence of Ireland’s wealth having been concentrated in the hands of British Anglican landlords at the expense of both the Catholic Irish and Protestant Scots-Irish, but hardy and well-suited to the hardscrabble lives they led on the frontier, and no strangers to conflict either with the natives, the ‘Anglo’ coastal settlements, or each other. +1 Skirmish Command, Personal Combat or Survival.

    Religion
    Episcopalian: You are a member of the Episcopalian Church, the dominant religion of the elite in America. Once the Episcopalians were just Anglicans and accordingly recognized the King of Britain as the head of the church, but when the Revolution severed all ties to the British Crown, that obviously had to change. Episcopalians are known for being religiously moderate, broadly accepting of America’s other faiths and to embrace Enlightenment ideology, though protective (sometimes jealously so) of their ties to the nation’s elite.

    Idolized philosopher
    Thomas Hobbes: In your younger years, the political philosopher you looked up to most was Thomas Hobbes. His belief that men would invariably live ‘poor, brutish and short’ lives and destroy one another if left to their natural devices and needed firm order in the form of a social contract in order to not engage in a chaotic ‘war of all against all’ rubbed off on you as a result, leaving you with conservative and ‘big state’ inclinations. +1 Espionage.

    Early Life
    Officer: Prior to entering politics, you secured a commission in the British (or if you’re still especially young, Continental) Army and took part in the mid-to-late 18th-century ‘cabinet wars’ between the Great Powers, from King George’s War to the French and Indian War, culminating in the American Revolution. You bring to the table your military experience and fame, or infamy, from your years at war. +1 Infantry, Cavalry, or Artillery Command.

    Role in the Revolution
    Infantry Commander: You were, at most, a colonel in the Continental Army, commanding over a unit of line infantry or riflemen up to regiment-size. As commissioned officers up to the rank of colonel did, you fought at the front lines with your men, sharing the glory of victory and the bitterness of defeat, taking injuries in battle, and wearing out your boots beneath you as you marched with them. +1 Infantry Command, Personal Combat or Rearguard.

    Role in the Confederation Period
    Congressman: Whether a newcomer or already a member of the wartime Continental Congress, you became a member of the post-Revolutionary War Congress of the Confederation, the feeble and virtually powerless nominal legislature of the USA under the original Articles of Confederation. With no military, no means of acquiring revenue, and little credence in the eyes of foreign powers, you and the rest of this Congress may as well not have existed - but you and it did, and despite your overall powerlessness, you still learned valuable political lessons & forged connections with the other Congressmen while you were there. +1 Charisma or Espionage.

    Joseph II MacCotter

    Joseph II MacCotter in Dragoon commander attire, ca. 1779

    Age: 31 (b. 1768)
    Spouse: Henrietta, née Lionheart (b. 1760)

    +2 Survival
    +2 Charisma
    +1 Cavalry Command

    Heritage
    Scots-Irish: You are the descendant of Scots-Irish, or Ulster Scot, settlers who mainly lived in the interior of the Thirteen Colonies, away from the coast. Your ancestors were likely poor, a consequence of Ireland’s wealth having been concentrated in the hands of British Anglican landlords at the expense of both the Catholic Irish and Protestant Scots-Irish, but hardy and well-suited to the hardscrabble lives they led on the frontier, and no strangers to conflict either with the natives, the ‘Anglo’ coastal settlements, or each other. +1 Skirmish Command, Personal Combat or Survival.

    Religion
    Episcopalian: You are a member of the Episcopalian Church, the dominant religion of the elite in America. Once the Episcopalians were just Anglicans and accordingly recognized the King of Britain as the head of the church, but when the Revolution severed all ties to the British Crown, that obviously had to change. Episcopalians are known for being religiously moderate, broadly accepting of America’s other faiths and to embrace Enlightenment ideology, though protective (sometimes jealously so) of their ties to the nation’s elite.

    Idolized philosopher
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: In your younger years, the political philosopher you looked up to most was Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His belief that humans were fundamentally good and that direct democracy, whereby all are free even as they impose their will on each other because their own will was taken into account within the general collective, was the best sort of democracy rubbed off on you as a result, leaving you with radically liberal and populistic inclinations. +1 Charisma.

    Early Life
    Frontiersman: Prior to entering politics, you lived on the wild western frontier of the former Thirteen Colonies. There you befriended other poor but determined pioneers and learned how to hunt and dress game, light fires, read smoke signals, fend off hostile Indian raids while dealing with friendly ones, and in general not die in the wilds. When the Revolution happened, it may have passed you by, or you may have participated as an irregular fighter. +1 Skirmish Command or Survival.

    Role in the Revolution
    Cavalry Officer: You were, at most, a colonel in the Continental Army, commanding over a unit of cavalry up to regiment size. The Continental Army’s cavalry were predominantly light scouts or dragoons, and so you and your men would have spent most of your time scouting ahead of the main army or taking on British foragers & scouts in isolated skirmishers rather than charging into massed redcoat formations. +1 Cavalry Command, Scout or Survival.

    Role in the Confederation Period
    Planter: Following the Patriot victory in the Revolutionary War, the dissolution of the armed forces and the ascent of the Articles of Confederation, you retired to life on your country estate until the time came to get more involved in public life. As a planter, you would have been busy managing your estate - whether it was worked by slaves, free tenants, or a mix of both - and keeping up with other socialites in peacetime, which may have also involved getting into duels over honor. +1 Charisma or Personal Combat.

    Personal Buildings

    TIER I

    TIER II

    TIER III
    Last edited by Lucius Malfoy; September 12, 2019 at 09:12 PM.
    Gaming Director for the Gaming Staff
    Gaming Director for the Play-by-Post Subforum and the RPG Shed


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •