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Thread: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

  1. #21
    Jokern's Avatar Mowbray of Nottingham
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    @jokern

    Willem Bok Senior was deep in his cups as the festivities reached a peak. He dapped the sweat from his forehead, his handkerchief now throughly stained. He eyed the crowd, his eyes eventually falling on Thomas Lindberg, the Governor casually excused himself and made his way toward the newly minted Governor of Pennsylvania. “Ah, good to see you here, I believe congratulations are in order.” His cheeks were rosy pink. “I thought I’d get to know the man who will be governing New York’s closest neighbor.”

    xxxxxxx

    After speaking with Lionheart, Pierre spotted Harris and could not help himself but go to speak with the man. His old subordinate, rival, enemy. The man surrounded himself with President Lionheart’s enemies, so it seemed odd that Pierre had seen the Vice President speaking to Harris earlier. Something to keep in mind, Pierre thought as he approached. “Ami.” He said, surprising the man in the language Harris loathed above all others. “Have you been enjoying my time away from the states, Mr. Harris?” He asked, a slight smirk gracing his lips and a smug aura of condescension radiating about him.
    Thomas turned around and smiled at the inebriated man who greeted him, shaking his hand.

    "Ah, thank you Mr... Bok, isn't it? A pleasure to make your acquaintance. Congratulations to you as well, with your state having the honor to host the first Presidential inauguration in our country's history. Let us hope these good festivities are an omen for a bright future ahead, especially with our new and untested Constitution."

    ------------------------

    Harris felt a chill run down his spine when he heard Bellerose's friendly greeting. He would have to calm down lest he beat the man with his cane. He faced the Frenchman with a forced smile.

    "Mr. Bellerose... these past years have done wonders to my health, thank you very much. I am surprised the yearning for your mother country did not have strong enough grip on you, though I guess with the current state of madness in France any half-sane man would flee."

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Goldwater View Post
    "Have no fear, I'm sure I'll be visiting Philadelphia often, on account of it being where Congress meets - it might be more efficient to travel there to deal with any bills they pass than to have them be sent to my desk, so that if any should wish to object to my signature or veto, they can do it to my face rather than engage in a back-and-forth with letters. If our Congress proves especially active, perhaps I'll have to come more often than the city's most esteemed citizens can bear." Arthur smiled at the joke.

    "My return to civilian life has been a welcome break from the battlefield. All grandfathers should spend some of their days playing with their grandchildren and watching their fields grow, in my opinion." Lionheart spared a glance at the next dish the servants were bringing out, steak by the looks of it, but quickly returned his gaze to Lindberg. "I confess that at times, I do miss it - planning around the war table, the pageantry and heroic bloodshed on the field of battle alike, thinking up a new stratagem midway through battle to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat, and the thrill of triumph. But you have my word, as Pierre Bellerose did not long ago, that I will not start a war simply to relieve my boredom." He chuckled at that.
    Thomas chuckled at the President's joke.

    "Philadelphia will always be a grateful host to the President, how many times you choose to visit. Unless we can agree on a new federal district to be carved out of another state, the actions of the federal government will have to be tempered by the journey between our two cities."

    Lindberg took a sip of wine before answering Arthur Lionheart.

    "A promise very much welcome, Mr. President. For nine long years we fought for our freedom, the desire for more bloodshed should be extinguished from the hearts of the people. I pray our children and grandchildren are blessed with a world that will spare them from the hardships we had to face. A toast to that, even!"

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord William View Post
    It was a struggle in those days, the contential Congress was refusing to adopt the Massachusetts militia, they refused to send supplies and reinforcements, they refused to declare war hoping Britain would concede to their demands. Britain’s attacks of aggression only meant war and they were fools not to see it. General Lionheart may have given America her must needed military victories but Richard Clare orchestrated the fight for independence without which the cause would have been lost of hope and doomed from the start.

    Indeed you may Sir,
    Should I ever endeavour to Albany I shall call upon you.
    I have served within several foreign courts on the road to independence, France, Netherlands, and Britain.
    He twirled his cane in his hands, pondering his next words.

    "Mr. Clare, what is your opinion of Britain and France, now that the dust has been allowed to settle after the war?"
    Last edited by Jokern; September 13, 2019 at 02:34 AM.

  2. #22
    Pericles of Athens's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    He laughed. “Yes, yes. Bok is the name. Ah, the gem that is New York was a natural choice, but surly we would be meeting in your Philadelphia if it had not been here. Though I must say I’m grateful I didn’t have to make such a terribly long trip.” He sipped at his beverage. “Bah.” The man said, merrily. “The states are strong, on the backs of places like New York and Pennsylvania the country will survive and thrive.”

    XXXXXXX

    ”Ah yes, the country of my father’s father. A gem to be certain, and Paris.. c’est manifique.” He said wistfully, punctuating his words with a grin. “You may have lost me forever if President Lionheart had not been elected, but that would have been tragic, to keep such.. friends as us apart.” He have a slight eye in regards to France’s current state. “Ah, but the French crown has everything well and under control I suspect. Do not worry yourself, our closest and oldest friend King Louis will remain strong, of this I’ve no doubts.”
    Last edited by Pericles of Athens; September 12, 2019 at 09:46 PM.


  3. #23
    Barry Goldwater's Avatar Mr. Conservative
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucius Malfoy View Post
    A merry and loud laugh came from Lionel as he heard his old nickname from the days among the Continental Army. Everyone knew who he was, especially Lionheart, who called upon his cannons more than often to roar across the battlefields. Those were certainly the good days. More than naught, Harrison had to load and fire a cannon himself when crewmen were injured or killed. Drawing away from the thoughts of old, Lionel strikes a good smile at Arthur.

    Your Excellency, I must congratulate you on your greatest victory since Yorktown! You ensured our nation won its freedom, now you will further mold it as our country's elected leader.


    Lionel was more than pleased with the outcome of the elections, the first of their kind since the country earned its independence. Lionheart was the most deserving of any man here.

    I must say, its hard to enjoy peace. After all those years, I still feel the desire to fire a cannon, to command a battery, to hear the shells fly across the sky... like the screams of warring eagles. My hands still remember the thrill of loading those cannons... if only I could have served our country during Shay's Rebellion, but alas, I had my duties as Secretary of War.


    Not to mention that he was not as young as he used to be. His sons, Robert and Benjamin, were better suited to do such things. Speaking of which, Harrison turns and motions for Robert to join him. His eldest was presence with his wife, Joy-Again, simply called Joy, a daughter of the noted Prynne family. He motions to his son as he looks at Arthur.

    Your Excellency, I want you to meet my son, Robert. He was a Commodore within our Continental Navy and served on three ships; the Trumble, Warren, and the Dover, one of the French loaned frigates. And this is his wife, Joy, a daughter of Lemuel. You may remember him from the northern campaigns.

    Robert, practically a much younger looking Lionel, offers a smile and a hand to the President.

    Sir, its an honor to meet the General that my father has spoken so highly of. I was always at sea, so never got the opportunity to be under your command.



    James would glance at his son, Joseph, who was with Arthur's daughter, his wife, shortly after being acknowledged by Lionheart. Certainly, it was his son who probably ensured there was no ill will due to past allegiances. Conveniently, a passing servant walks up, allowing the Irishman to take a glass before turning to the President. He bows his head slightly.

    Your Excellency, I must give you my heartfelt congratulations on this momentous occasion. Your grandchildren, Henry and Elizabeth, certainly wished to see you, but Henrietta assured them another time.


    During the war, Arthur's daughter, married to Joseph II, on the eve of the Revolution, had given birth to twins. A son, named Henry, and a daughter, named Elizabeth. Both of whom bore names of ancient English monarchs. Something that James learned after the war and knew then and there that his son had not disowned his father for choosing the defeated side. It ensured that the house was at peace when he returned home.

    I still find Joseph hunting often when he can, especially with former comrades of his unit. I believe he misses leading the regiment of dragoons you entrusted him to command.


    James sips his wine calmly before speaking further.

    I must ask, Your Excellency, I am curious to know where you plan to set up our country's capital. Are you close to a decision?
    "Believe me, I know how you feel." Lionheart answered with a nod, his usual smile giving way to a more serious expression for once. "I miss the war table and overseeing the battlefield, witnessing the maneuvers we'd planned be executed by the men on the ground, and the thrill of victory - especially the close ones we achieved against bigger and meaner odds, which was often." The grin returned, but in a different form. Harrison could recognize it as the almost predatory grin Lionheart would sport when he had just outfoxed the redcoats and was on the cusp of victory.

    Arthur did not hesitate to shake Robert's hand when it was offered, and acknowledged Joy with a respectful nod. "My, my. I can see why the Congregationalists up north insist on such conservative and plain dress for their women - their beauty would blind any and all men otherwise! You're a lucky man, Robert." As he uttered the compliment, his grin was much more friendly again. "And that's just as well. The Navy played an important role in the war, after all. A shame that the frigates had to be sold off, in the end, while my and your father's army had to be disbanded. Were they still around, that rascal Shays would never have dared to rise up."

    ------

    "Another time indeed! God willing, it will be soon." Arthur lamented. Time with Lionel's children had been a precious break from the war and the relentless intrigues against Harris and his ilk. "And I assure you, I miss leading the entire army as much as Joseph might miss leading his unit. But, such is the cost of peace, which has its own welcome benefits anyway."

    "Truthfully I would prefer to fix our capital at Philadelphia, which already served us nobly during the war."
    Lionheart confided when James asked. "But I think that would anger our fellow Southrons as greatly as leaving it in New York would. Fixing it at Richmond or Charleston is likely to have a similar effect on the North, in my estimation. Perhaps someplace in Maryland, as close as possible to the exact geographical center between all our states, would be best, if I cannot persuade Congress to keep it at Philadelphia."
    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    ”Ah well, I suppose you’ve had more time to grow wistful for the battlefield. I have not enjoyed that luxury in my time.” He smiled blankly, as if in thought. “Though all the same I found myself thinking of home, and the Great War when I was gone..” Bellerose trailed off. “I suspect you will not have to, English power still lingers to the north and even in the Northwest territory, if I’m properly informed. When war comes I doubt it will be a choice.” He huffed. “But when the time comes the nation, and you, will have my sword, for as long as I can still hold one.”

    He mirrored the man’s laughter with a light chuckle. “Who knows you may grow to love the job, give it time. Eventually you’ll have to find something you’re good at, ami.” He finished as he began to cut off a piece of the creature himself. “Never close a door that God has opened.”
    "I appreciate it, old friend. Whatever comes, we must all come together to ensure our nation will be ready for it." Arthur affirmed as he dug into his portion of pseudo-turducken.

    "It is my hope that the British will soon learn we do not have to be their enemies in perpetuity, and that they can still greatly profit from trade with us...on more even terms, of course. But if not, well, I find no shame in admitting to the truth that we could not withstand them alone before and the odds are not still in our favor if we come to blows again." Lionheart had lowered his voice by now, so much so that even Bellerose would find it hard to hear him over the noise of the feast while sitting or standing next to him. "What can you tell me about the situation abroad in the heart of our greatest ally, and how likely they are to get involved should the British prove...incapable of accepting the reality of our independence?"
    Quote Originally Posted by Jokern View Post
    Thomas chuckled at the President's joke.

    "Philadelphia will always be a grateful host to the President, how many times you choose to visit. Unless we can agree on a new federal district to be carved out of another state, the actions of the federal government will have to be tempered by the journey between our two cities."

    Lindberg took a sip of wine before answering Arthur Lionheart.

    "A promise very much welcome, Mr. President. For nine long years we fought for our freedom, the desire for more bloodshed should be extinguished from the hearts of the people. I pray our children and grandchildren are blessed with a world that will spare them from the hardships we had to face. A toast to that, even!"
    "Let us toast!" Arthur raised his glass, beaming. "To a better, safer and freer home for our children and grandchildren. I'm sure that of all eighty-five members of our Congress you can find eight-six rivaling opinions, as you could have with the Continental Congress, and likewise you could easily find fourteen opinions between our thirteen states..." He chuckled at that. Sometimes it felt like he spent more time wrangling with Congress for resources or to protect his position from wannabe usurpers like Harris than actually fighting the Revolutionary War. "But that is well and good, so long as all remember to set their petty feuds aside for the sake of the American nation when it matters."

  4. #24
    chesser2538's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    "Excellent, excellent. If Patrick ever desires advice on how to manage his estate, he is, of course, more than welcome to ask myself or Lionel." Arthur nodded, carelessly draining his own glass in the process. There was no way asking a father-in-law to dispense tips on how to maximize your plantation's efficiency could remotely reasonably qualify as corruption, as far as he was concerned; it wasn't like he'd be handing out wads of federal cash to any relative of his who asked, particularly not when such funds were needed for the repayment of the national debt. "And that's better still to hear. I'll have to visit your household sometime to meet my grandchildren - or they could come, whether here or the Lion's Den, I'm not fussed either way."
    Sterling expected his son would appreciate the news."I will pass on the offer." Looking down at his own now empty glass with a look of annoyance James glanced back to Arthur. "And I am sure we can find an excuse for the grandchildren to visit, if no other reason than to run around your large house." James could already see young Francis charging down the long hallways and wide stairwells. "This all really is quite impressive you know."


    James MacCotter, having recently ended his conversation with the President, moved away to find a servant. He hands him his empty glass, but his attention was caught by the greeting of Edward Drake. He didn't seem to recall him from beyond Congress, but from what he recalled, Edward was a fellow pro slavery politician and a fellow southerner. The senator nods his head at Edward.

    Mister Drake, it is good to see you here.


    He glances at the President, recalling times of old for a moment.

    My father mentored His Excellency, we served together against the French, and my son has married his daughter. As you can see, it would be impossible for me not to come.

    James says with a smile to Drake.

    How is your family and South Carolina?
    "Yes quite so." Edward responds, "It really is an occasion any man of character could dare miss."

    The mention of MacCotter's past service brought back memories for Edward.

    "I fought against the French as well, lead a regiment of Calvary up north... Did the same in the revolution as well." Pausing as memories flicker to the forefront,

    "Actually I believe your son served under me for a time, back early in the war...

    Edward could not quite recall where, it being so long back.
    Last edited by chesser2538; September 13, 2019 at 12:38 AM.

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  5. #25
    Pericles of Athens's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Bellerose drew closure, speaking softly, with a slight smile. So those around him might think he was sharing a bawdy jape. “I would not listen to the snakes that hiss in your ear, Britain was your country once, but no longer. If it had not been for my brother securing the intervention of France and Spain.. well, the British would have fit us all with nooses long ago.” Bellerose fidgeted in his chair uncomfortably. “I may be alone when I say this, ami, but they are no friends of ours. Lest they would have vacated the Northwest Territory. And yet their shadow still looms.” Bellerose sighed, his mood fouled further by thoughts of the home country’s troubles. “Things.. fair in Paris. The people love the King, but the debts incurred fighting the British are not inconsequential. Some agitate the mob, but I trust His.. King Louis will be able to deal with them. I hear Spain fairs far better, though if France should choose to sit the war out.. I know not if we can expect aid from them.” He sliced off a slice of meat, filling his mouth, and washing it down with some wine. “Perhaps my brother would be able to convince them to aid us again, though even his talents have limits.” He looked around sheepishly, as if to ensure no one were listening. “I know you are President, and I merely a former soldier, but if I might grant you a parcel of wisdom.. pay our debts in turn and seek to keep our allies close. Men like Harris will seek to drive a wedge between us and our allies, but a fledgling nation needs friends, preferably powerful ones with armies and big ships.” The Frenchmen smile amiably.
    Last edited by Pericles of Athens; September 13, 2019 at 12:41 AM.


  6. #26
    Lord William's Avatar Duke of Nottingham
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    He twirled his cane in his hands, pondering his next words.

    "Mr. Clare, what is your opinion of Britain and France, now that the dust has been allowed to settle after the war?"
    I like all Americans are indebted to our French allies who helped us achieve our independence, yet one cannot forget the bonds of kinship we share with Britain. It is with great importance that we treat with both France and Britain, avoiding european conflicts and opening up trade. The safety and preservation of our nation should be our only concern and we must not become a pawn in the games of Europe
    Last edited by Lord William; September 13, 2019 at 04:13 AM.

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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Van Ressenlaer had been invited by credit to his relatives and wealth. He politely remained silent unless adressed, for the men around were congressmen, senators and even a president. Some men he knew, some only by name or by reputation, but still. The patroon tried to engage in polite conversation with his immediate neighbours, as any gentleman of note would do. He wondered where his in-laws, Hamiltons and Schuylers, were currently. Stephen was sure some other among his many relatives would be present, but wigs and formal attire made harder to glance known people, less so in such an excited crowd. The powder he had used to fancily white his own dark hair was a bit itchy, mostly because he was sweating slightly under the candlelight, wearing velvet and by being surrounded by a talkative mass of people. At least the drink wasn't half bad, neither the cooks looked amateur or unskilled, so far.

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  8. #28
    Barry Goldwater's Avatar Mr. Conservative
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by chesser2538 View Post
    Sterling expected his son would appreciate the news."I will pass on the offer." Looking down at his own now empty glass with a look of annoyance James glanced back to Arthur. "And I am sure we can find an excuse for the grandchildren to visit, if no other reason than to run around your large house." James could already see young Francis charging down the long hallways and wide stairwells. "This all really is quite impressive you know."
    "What can I say, my friend? I try." Lionheart laughed out loud, patting his gut. It had grown significantly in peacetime, but as he ran for the presidency he began to exercise and ride more frequently and tempered his diet again, causing it to begin shrinking to more manageable proportions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    Bellerose drew closure, speaking softly, with a slight smile. So those around him might think he was sharing a bawdy jape. “I would not listen to the snakes that hiss in your ear, Britain was your country once, but no longer. If it had not been for my brother securing the intervention of France and Spain.. well, the British would have fit us all with nooses long ago.” Bellerose fidgeted in his chair uncomfortably. “I may be alone when I say this, ami, but they are no friends of ours. Lest they would have vacated the Northwest Territory. And yet their shadow still looms.” Bellerose sighed, his mood fouled further by thoughts of the home country’s troubles. “Things.. fair in Paris. The people love the King, but the debts incurred fighting the British are not inconsequential. Some agitate the mob, but I trust His.. King Louis will be able to deal with them. I hear Spain fairs far better, though if France should choose to sit the war out.. I know not if we can expect aid from them.” He sliced off a slice of meat, filling his mouth, and washing it down with some wine. “Perhaps my brother would be able to convince them to aid us again, though even his talents have limits.” He looked around sheepishly, as if to ensure no one were listening. “I know you are President, and I merely a former soldier, but if I might grant you a parcel of wisdom.. pay our debts in turn and seek to keep our allies close. Men like Harris will seek to drive a wedge between us and our allies, but a fledgling nation needs friends, preferably powerful ones with armies and big ships.” The Frenchmen smile amiably.
    Lionheart nodded along as Bellerose whispered in his ear, looking to any outsider observer as though he was focused on devouring his food. But the French-American would know, as anyone who got to know Lionheart well would, that in truth the President was paying more attention than he let on. Bellerose's French sympathies were no secret to Lionheart, who knew enough of history and had been good enough chums to the former to know of his reasons for detesting the British and wanting to draw close to France. But he also knew that no small number of other Americans, including those he would consider inclined to support him, favored ties with Britain for any number of reasons - their shared cultural background, perhaps, or more often trade, particularly among New Englanders (that his own Vice-President is a New England was not lost on him).

    Finally, when he finished his meal - coincidentally, or not, just as Bellerose finished speaking - Arthur straightened his posture and washed down the last bits of sausage-infused turkey with a deep red wine. "Have no fear, my man, I would never contemplate turning on our French friends after everything they've done for us. And of course there's still reason to be suspicious of Britain...as I speak there are still redcoats billeted in forts in the northwest, on our land. That must and shall be rectified." He answered, looking and sounding dead serious for once. The idea that his old archenemy Harris might favor rapproachment with the British soured him on the notion of a pro-British policy, even if the less emotional parts of his brain were shouting at him to separate his emotions from rational politics.

    "But they are still too strong, and we are still too weak, for any serious confrontation." Shays' Rebellion had been a close enough call for the government of Massachusetts. And if the government had struggled to defeat a mob of rebellious rabble armed with hunting muskets, then contending with a Great Power before properly rebuilding their army and navy to match - or even exceed - the Continental glory days was certainly completely out of the question. "If I can, I will rectify our issues with Britain peaceably and with reason. If the French are...distracted...by internal matters, then keeping the peace becomes all the more vital." That bit of news was unwelcome. It did not take a genius to figure that if the French were unable to intervene in any future Anglo-American war due to internal troubles, then the US would be stuck up a river of excrement without a paddle. "Whatever troubles King Louis, I certainly hope it passes soon. In the meantime, I will assuredly honor our debts to him. Anything less would dishonor our nation."
    Quote Originally Posted by Oznerol View Post
    Van Ressenlaer had been invited by credit to his relatives and wealth. He politely remained silent unless adressed, for the men around were congressmen, senators and even a president. Some men he knew, some only by name or by reputation, but still. The patroon tried to engage in polite conversation with his immediate neighbours, as any gentleman of note would do. He wondered where his in-laws, Hamiltons and Schuylers, were currently. Stephen was sure some other among his many relatives would be present, but wigs and formal attire made harder to glance known people, less so in such an excited crowd. The powder he had used to fancily white his own dark hair was a bit itchy, mostly because he was sweating slightly under the candlelight, wearing velvet and by being surrounded by a talkative mass of people. At least the drink wasn't half bad, neither the cooks looked amateur or unskilled, so far.
    As the festivities continued to swirl about him and few people of note, or whose opinions he cared about, came up to him, Lionel Lionheart found himself getting bored. His father's food was good and the wine better, but the company was lacking and his wife had to tend to their children. With nothing better to do, the President's son and freshly elected Senator from Virginia rose from his seat and began looking for other people he thought he might have an interesting conversation with. It did not take long for him to find a younger man who he could not recognize amidst the sea of former officers and members of the Continental Congress, and was remaining oddly silent and reserved amidst the celebrations. Was this fellow just shy or waiting for family and friends of his own? Lionheart the Younger figured the fastest way to figure that out would be to ask him, so on he went, casually sauntering up to Van Rensselaer to engage him in conversation.

    "Well, hello there! I recognize many of the faces here in this hall, but not yours. Lionel Lionheart, at your service." The Senator extended his hand to the patroon once he was in range. And who might you be? was the unspoken, but obvious question, manifested and calling for an answer in Lionheart's offered handshake.

  9. #29
    Pericles of Athens's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    “Yes, more reason to bide our time. Give France time to work out it’s own difficulties, it would not be wise to throw our strength away alone.” Bellerose agreed, finishing his own plate. He had lost his appetite, but didn’t wish to offend his host. “It is good to hear you will hold to our deals. The high road can be more difficult, but honor is paramount, God is watching after all.” He leaned back patting his stomach happily. “Though, I do have a suggestion. We are no great power, but trade with our fledgling nation holds value. Perhaps we should favor that value toward our allies on the continent, rather than further strengthening Britain and its eternally growing empire?” He waved his hand dismissively, his feelings toward France and Britain both were well known, as such he knew his words might hold little weight. Though, he felt comfortable sharing such words with a friend. “But, my brother would know more about such things, and has a voice in Congress besides. I shall leave such matters to those who understand them.” He reached toward a passing servant and retrieved a bottle of brandy. “Now, please tell me you remember how to drink, General.”

    XXXXX

    Philippe Bellerose approaches the son of the famed Lionheart, after having his fill of conversation with his father’s old friend from France. He generally liked to give his father space when he met with old friends, the man was middle aged, but could get very rowdy when the occasion called for it. The young Philippe spotted the younger Lionheart from across the room, approaching him thoughtfully. “Bonjour.” He said as he approached, a glass of wine in hand. “You are Lionel Lionheart are you not, non?” He questioned. “I never had the pleasure of meeting you while we served in the war.”
    Last edited by Pericles of Athens; September 13, 2019 at 11:53 PM.


  10. #30

    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Goldwater View Post
    As the festivities continued to swirl about him and few people of note, or whose opinions he cared about, came up to him, Lionel Lionheart found himself getting bored. His father's food was good and the wine better, but the company was lacking and his wife had to tend to their children. With nothing better to do, the President's son and freshly elected Senator from Virginia rose from his seat and began looking for other people he thought he might have an interesting conversation with. It did not take long for him to find a younger man who he could not recognize amidst the sea of former officers and members of the Continental Congress, and was remaining oddly silent and reserved amidst the celebrations. Was this fellow just shy or waiting for family and friends of his own? Lionheart the Younger figured the fastest way to figure that out would be to ask him, so on he went, casually sauntering up to Van Rensselaer to engage him in conversation.

    "Well, hello there! I recognize many of the faces here in this hall, but not yours. Lionel Lionheart, at your service." The Senator extended his hand to the patroon once he was in range. And who might you be? was the unspoken, but obvious question, manifested and calling for an answer in Lionheart's offered handshake.
    He was caught in the middle of a cough fit.

    "Senator Lionheart"


    Greeted the patroon.

    "You're the president's son"


    He said, stating the blatantly obvious. Blushing slightly.

    "I'm Stephen van Rensselaer"

    The young man hoped the senator would know him, if not by name, still by reputation. He didn't add the third of his name to his introduction because it sounded pompous.

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  11. #31
    Barry Goldwater's Avatar Mr. Conservative
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    “Yes, more reason to bide our time. Give France time to work out it’s own difficulties, it would not be wise to throw our strength away alone.” Bellerose agreed, finishing his own plate. He had lost his appetite, but didn’t wish to offend his host. “It is good to hear you will hold to our deals. The high road can be more difficult, but honor is paramount, God is watching after all.” He leaned back patting his stomach happily. “Though, I do have a suggestion. We are no great power, but trade with our fledgling nation holds value. Perhaps we should favor that value toward our allies on the continent, rather than further strengthening Britain and its eternally growing empire?” He waved his hand dismissively, his feelings toward France and Britain both were well known, as such he knew his words might hold little weight. Though, he felt comfortable sharing such words with a friend. “But, my brother would know more about such things, and has a voice in Congress besides. I shall leave such matters to those who understand them.” He reached toward a passing servant and retrieved a bottle of brandy. “Now, please tell me you remember how to drink, General.”

    XXXXX

    Philippe Bellerose approaches the son of the famed Lionheart, after having his fill of conversation with his father’s old friend from France. He generally liked to give his father space when he met with old friends, the man was middle aged, but could get very rowdy when the occasion called for it. The young Philippe spotted the younger Lionheart from across the room, approaching him thoughtfully. “Bonjour.” He said as he approached, a glass of wine in hand. “You are Lionel Lionheart are you not, non?” He questioned. “I never had the pleasure of meeting you while we served in the war.”
    "I'd sooner forget how to breathe." Lionheart chortled, eager for the detour from talk of politics. Balancing international relations was already making his head spin...or maybe it was all the wine he'd been pouring down his throat for, what, the last hour? There would be time to worry about all that tomorrow, or the day after. Congress wasn't going anywhere, after all, and neither were the British, French and Spanish. "Cheers!"

    -----

    "I am he," Lionel responded as if it were the most obvious thing in the world. "And you are Mister Bellerose, I assume. Would I be correct in assuming further that you heard of me from your father, as I heard of you from mine? You're right that our paths have never crossed before, which I find quite odd given who our fathers are." Now this was a man worth talking to, at last: the son of his father's steel right hand, of whom he knew nothing beyond his existence, gleaned from conversations about the elder Bellerose with old Arthur. "Where did you serve, if I might ask?"
    Quote Originally Posted by Oznerol View Post
    He was caught in the middle of a cough fit.

    "Senator Lionheart"


    Greeted the patroon.

    "You're the president's son"


    He said, stating the blatantly obvious. Blushing slightly.

    "I'm Stephen van Rensselaer"

    The young man hoped the senator would know him, if not by name, still by reputation. He didn't add the third of his name to his introduction because it sounded pompous.
    "So I am." Lionheart flashed a lion-like smile. His reputation preceding him always made him smile, though he would have preferred to be known as a proper prince rather than the son of a mere president. "Van Rensselaer, eh? I think I've heard of you. Master of the largest estate in this part of the country, if what I've heard is correct." Truthfully, that was all the younger Lionheart knew, for Van Rensselaer could not have served in the war due to his young age and in general he wasn't an expert on New York politics outside of 'Hamilton = my friend, therefore Hamilton = good'. Speaking of which..."I don't suppose you're related to, or at least associated with, any of the New Yorkers I fought with during the war. General Schuyler, perhaps? Or Alexander Hamilton?" Who was known to be married to a Schuyler himself, and one of several important staff officers surrounding his father from the advent of the Continental Army onward. Lionheart himself was surprised he hadn't run into the latter so far all evening.

  12. #32
    Pericles of Athens's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    “There is the man I knew.” Bellerose says jovially. “Cheers! To good friends, good booze, and to you Mr. President.” Bellerose could deal with politics and plans tomorrow, today was for drink and good company.

    XXXXXXXX

    “Indeed, it is strange. That neither our fathers nor the war had our paths merge. Yet fate would decide we meet at a party.” He shrugged. “C’est la vie. God works in mysterious ways.” The 1st generation American sipped his drink. “I served in the Maryland 2nd. Fought at Trenton, took a grievous wound at Princeton. Returned just in time for the disaster at Camden.” Philippe was certain, beyond a doubt, that Harris had purposefully set him and his men up for failure. And likely cost them the battle, though perhaps that was his arrogance speaking. “Then service in the southern campaign, until the end.” He smiles warmly. “It can be difficult to emerge from the shadow of great men like our fathers, non? But forgive me, I have not asked for your own record of service?”


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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Goldwater View Post
    "So I am." Lionheart flashed a lion-like smile. His reputation preceding him always made him smile, though he would have preferred to be known as a proper prince rather than the son of a mere president. "Van Rensselaer, eh? I think I've heard of you. Master of the largest estate in this part of the country, if what I've heard is correct." Truthfully, that was all the younger Lionheart knew, for Van Rensselaer could not have served in the war due to his young age and in general he wasn't an expert on New York politics outside of 'Hamilton = my friend, therefore Hamilton = good'. Speaking of which..."I don't suppose you're related to, or at least associated with, any of the New Yorkers I fought with during the war. General Schuyler, perhaps? Or Alexander Hamilton?" Who was known to be married to a Schuyler himself, and one of several important staff officers surrounding his father from the advent of the Continental Army onward. Lionheart himself was surprised he hadn't run into the latter so far all evening.
    "Yes, and the oldest"

    He said, adding nothing more about his estate, because it wasn't elegant to boast about such things between gentlemen.

    "The general Schuyler is my father-in-law and, thusly, Mr Hamilton is my brother-in-law. You may also personally have met Philip Livingston, my grandfather, God bless him"

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  14. #34
    Barry Goldwater's Avatar Mr. Conservative
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    “There is the man I knew.” Bellerose says jovially. “Cheers! To good friends, good booze, and to you Mr. President.” Bellerose could deal with politics and plans tomorrow, today was for drink and good company.

    XXXXXXXX

    “Indeed, it is strange. That neither our fathers nor the war had our paths merge. Yet fate would decide we meet at a party.” He shrugged. “C’est la vie. God works in mysterious ways.” The 1st generation American sipped his drink. “I served in the Maryland 2nd. Fought at Trenton, took a grievous wound at Princeton. Returned just in time for the disaster at Camden.” Philippe was certain, beyond a doubt, that Harris had purposefully set him and his men up for failure. And likely cost them the battle, though perhaps that was his arrogance speaking. “Then service in the southern campaign, until the end.” He smiles warmly. “It can be difficult to emerge from the shadow of great men like our fathers, non? But forgive me, I have not asked for your own record of service?”
    "Ah. My condolences on having to serve under Harris." Lionel chuckled darkly. Camden had been one of the blackest days of the Revolution, and the fact that the commanding general - who had tried to undermine and replace his own father - was able to recover, and his father didn't press his advantage to get the man fully 'retired', baffled the younger Lionheart to no end. "Still, it all worked out well enough for our families in the end, didn't it." It sure did in his view - even if not entirely removed Harris was disgraced, Bellerose replaced him and took the lion's share of the glory in the Southern Campaign, and of course the elder Lionheart kept his position and led the Continental Army to its final triumph.

    "That it is. Lionheart and Bellerose Senior have cast shadows the size of mountains." He continued with a dramatic flourish of his hand. "Nevertheless, my own father taught me that it is the duty of each generation to leave the world a better place for their successors. No matter how monumental our fathers' achievements were, we must - and dare I say we can, this country is even younger than either of us and who knows what future opportunities will become present - eclipse them in time, for the sake of our children and their grandchildren." Lionel could already think of several things he was pretty sure he'd do better than his old man.

    "I spent the first days of the war defending home and hearth from Lord Dunmore's forces and efforts to incite servile insurrection, but I only joined the Continental Army and began to fight outside of Virginia nearly a year later when I rode at the head of the First Continental Light Dragoons." Lionel proudly answered when asked about his war record. This was something he'd never get tired of talking about, for sure. "I was everywhere my father wasn't. If your father and General Harrison were his strong right and left arms, I and the other dragoon commanders were his eyes, always scouting ahead of him, protecting the army's flanks from Howe's and Clinton's efforts to outmaneuver us and innocent towns from Hessian depredations, and driving off redcoat foragers. I was later sent south with your father, and primarily fought to keep the backcountry clear of Tories and to challenge Banastre the Butcher everywhere he reared his ugly head." He conspicuously fingered the gold medal pinned to his chest, a rare award from Congress for his victory at the former. "Best days of my life, let me tell you. I've yet to experience anything that beats the thrill of cavalry combat, whether it was an honorable clash of arms like those at Paulus Hook and Guilford Court House or a vicious little skirmish with Hessians and the gang of murderous scum Tarleton called his 'green dragoons'."
    Quote Originally Posted by Oznerol View Post
    "Yes, and the oldest"

    He said, adding nothing more about his estate, because it wasn't elegant to boast about such things between gentlemen.

    "The general Schuyler is my father-in-law and, thusly, Mr Hamilton is my brother-in-law. You may also personally have met Philip Livingston, my grandfather, God bless him"
    "Ah, excellent." This man was well-connected, even if not well-known just yet. And connected to the right people, at that. "I consider Alexander Hamilton a good friend. My father was wise to make him aide-de-camp, and he and I both correctly saw the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation immediately following the war - it is a shame that it took Shays' Rebellion to convince the leaders and notables of the threat. But I shall leave it to him to regale you with the full story of his wartime exploits, if you desire to hear it." Lionel smiled and clasped his gloved hands together. It wasn't his place to tell other people's war stories unless they were his dead friends, and Hamilton was still alive...just not around at this banquet yet, it seemed.

    "I never met your grandfather, sadly. But I have heard great things about him from my own father, who worked with him as late as the Battle of Brooklyn Heights. He was one of the engineers of the boycott on British goods before the Revolution, no?" A shame that he died before witnessing the Revolution's final triumph. But triumph it did, and surely Livingston would smile if he saw what the revolutionaries had accomplished from his seat in Heaven. What they had accomplished since would probably have been less thrilling, though.

  15. #35
    Jokern's Avatar Mowbray of Nottingham
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Pericles of Athens View Post
    He laughed. “Yes, yes. Bok is the name. Ah, the gem that is New York was a natural choice, but surly we would be meeting in your Philadelphia if it had not been here. Though I must say I’m grateful I didn’t have to make such a terribly long trip.” He sipped at his beverage. “Bah.” The man said, merrily. “The states are strong, on the backs of places like New York and Pennsylvania the country will survive and thrive.”

    XXXXXXX

    ”Ah yes, the country of my father’s father. A gem to be certain, and Paris.. c’est manifique.” He said wistfully, punctuating his words with a grin. “You may have lost me forever if President Lionheart had not been elected, but that would have been tragic, to keep such.. friends as us apart.” He have a slight eye in regards to France’s current state. “Ah, but the French crown has everything well and under control I suspect. Do not worry yourself, our closest and oldest friend King Louis will remain strong, of this I’ve no doubts.”
    Thomas nodded as he sipped his wine.

    "I will toast to that, Mr. Bok! I hope that our merry agreement tonight will continue between our two neighboring states. New York and Pennsylvania gain nothing from conflict, God knows we've had enough trouble with the Connecticut Yankees."

    ------------------------------

    Harris rolled his cane between his hands, smiling a cocky smile.

    "We shall see, Mr. Bellerose, we shall see. Our country would do well to not tie itself to any papist nation too tightly, lest the rats slip in and consume America from within. Please give my regards to Mr. Lionheart, I will not bother him when he is so busy celebrating his... victory."

    The word tasted like ash in his mouth. He had no doubt that the election for Lionheart had been rigged in favor of the "Hero of the American Revolution". He had no need to give Lionheart the satisfaction of rubbing it in his face directly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Goldwater View Post
    "Let us toast!" Arthur raised his glass, beaming. "To a better, safer and freer home for our children and grandchildren. I'm sure that of all eighty-five members of our Congress you can find eight-six rivaling opinions, as you could have with the Continental Congress, and likewise you could easily find fourteen opinions between our thirteen states..." He chuckled at that. Sometimes it felt like he spent more time wrangling with Congress for resources or to protect his position from wannabe usurpers like Harris than actually fighting the Revolutionary War. "But that is well and good, so long as all remember to set their petty feuds aside for the sake of the American nation when it matters."
    "If everyone thought the same, we would have no need for government. Let our democracy be built on differing opinions finding common ground."

    Lindberg dug in to the dinner, keeping up light conversation with the dinner guests next to him.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord William View Post
    I like all Americans are indebted to our French allies who helped us achieve our independence, yet one cannot forget the bonds of kinship we share with Britain. It is with great importance that we treat with both France and Britain, avoiding european conflicts and opening up trade. The safety and preservation of our nation should be our only concern and we must not become a pawn in the games of Europe
    Harris pondered and nodded. Personally he would throw France in the gutter, but there was no need to talk of such proposals yet.

    "Agreed, Mr. Clare. As an independent nation in a new world, we must assert ourselves on the world stage. The old monarchies will drag us down if we tie ourselves too hard to them."

    Harris noticed in the corner of his eye that his son Edward was calling for him, standing next to a few other guests from Rhode Island. He turned back to Richard Clare and smiled.

    "It has been a pleasure talking to you, Mr. Clare, and I hope to do so more in the future. I must excuse myself for now, it seems by presence is needed elsewhere. Take care, and God bless."

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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    @Barry

    “Your condolences are appreciated, hopefully we can keep that snake from working his way back into importance.” He could never understand why Lionheart nor his own father had sacked the man, discrediting him fully when they had the chance. “That it did, particularly well for yours.” The younger Bellerose agreed. God only knows where my father will end up. The youth thought, there was no military to serve in, not yet, and his father did not seem the man to run for office.. but he had to have returned to the former colonies for a reason. “After all, your father sits one step away from a Kingship.” He laughed, there were men that would take offense at such a statement of course, but the younger Bellerose was far from meek. “Yes. We must strive to surpass our fathers, even as their shadows continue to grow with fresh achievements.” He nodded. “The war was a diffrent time, a different world. One where enemies were clean and honor was obvious. But, in peace perhaps we can make a name as well? I have found myself positioned in the House, and what of you? I hear you sought an office for yourself?” He questioned.

    @Jok

    ”Yes, Yes. Troubles abound, territories, disputes.” He agreed. “I have the unfortunate draw of dealing with these New Yorkers who call themselves Vermont.” He huffed. “And a need to come to agreements with the natives along the lakes in my states. But the friendship of our western neighbor will be a treasured help.”

    xxxxxxx

    ”Thankfully, few seem to agree with that sentiment. I think the American people know where the rats are hiding.” He gave a smile. “I will pass your.. regards to His Excellency the President. Enjoy your night, Mr. Harris.” The former General allowed, as he excused himself, giving a satisfied smug look.
    Last edited by Pericles of Athens; September 16, 2019 at 01:15 AM.


  17. #37
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Goldwater View Post
    "Believe me, I know how you feel." Lionheart answered with a nod, his usual smile giving way to a more serious expression for once. "I miss the war table and overseeing the battlefield, witnessing the maneuvers we'd planned be executed by the men on the ground, and the thrill of victory - especially the close ones we achieved against bigger and meaner odds, which was often." The grin returned, but in a different form. Harrison could recognize it as the almost predatory grin Lionheart would sport when he had just outfoxed the redcoats and was on the cusp of victory.

    Arthur did not hesitate to shake Robert's hand when it was offered, and acknowledged Joy with a respectful nod. "My, my. I can see why the Congregationalists up north insist on such conservative and plain dress for their women - their beauty would blind any and all men otherwise! You're a lucky man, Robert." As he uttered the compliment, his grin was much more friendly again. "And that's just as well. The Navy played an important role in the war, after all. A shame that the frigates had to be sold off, in the end, while my and your father's army had to be disbanded. Were they still around, that rascal Shays would never have dared to rise up."

    ------

    "Another time indeed! God willing, it will be soon." Arthur lamented. Time with Lionel's children had been a precious break from the war and the relentless intrigues against Harris and his ilk. "And I assure you, I miss leading the entire army as much as Joseph might miss leading his unit. But, such is the cost of peace, which has its own welcome benefits anyway."

    "Truthfully I would prefer to fix our capital at Philadelphia, which already served us nobly during the war."
    Lionheart confided when James asked. "But I think that would anger our fellow Southrons as greatly as leaving it in New York would. Fixing it at Richmond or Charleston is likely to have a similar effect on the North, in my estimation. Perhaps someplace in Maryland, as close as possible to the exact geographical center between all our states, would be best, if I cannot persuade Congress to keep it at Philadelphia."
    That's exactly what father said about Shay. If only we had our navy and army still around, then that rebellion would have been over within a few short weeks.

    Harrison pats his son's shoulder after Robert speaks. He then takes a step back, thanking the President for his time. Lionel looks at his son for a moment before turning to Arthur.

    Shay's Rebellion reminded us all of how fragile our country still is. I can only hope that the states vote for the reintroduction of a federal army and navy to protect our country. Both Spain and Britain are just a stone's throwaway and France may be our ally... but I always felt that was a marriage of convenience. I hear that King Louis was hardly happy at the gains the French made.


    Lionel grabs a drink from a passing tray.

    Not to mention the many native tribes that live beyond our borders. Our people will need protection if they seek to settle further and further West.

    Robert, who was still present, spoke in turn.

    Shipping lanes to the South are still unprotected by the pirates that linger around the islands of the Bahamas and the Caribbean. Not to mention privateers in Europe and the corsairs of the Ottoman Empire and the African nations.

    ========================

    James could see that the President had thoroughly examined this situation. The choice of a capital would likely have its effect on the various politicians if it wasn't positioned just right after all.

    I believe Philadelphia would be a suitable capital. Its role during the Revolution was paramount and I know my former British superiors know of its vital importance. It was the ideal stronghold in the North and if, God forbid, Britain returns, Philadelphia would be perfectly situated to serve as a command post against any northern advance.

    The commander side of MacCotter came out in that instance, recalling the northern campaigns from what he had read.

    Speaking of Maryland, the city of Annapolis, along Chesapeake Bay, was a temporary capital recently for the nation and it served as the seat for the Confederation Congress. Given its position along the coast, it would certainly be quite the place to situate a capital. Chesapeake Bay is easy to defend if you situate sound forts along its coast. Good place for shipping and trade would help build capital as well and attract citizens. If built right, it could be a thriving port and capital.

    Quote Originally Posted by chesser2538 View Post
    "Yes quite so." Edward responds, "It really is an occasion any man of character could dare miss."

    The mention of MacCotter's past service brought back memories for Edward.

    "I fought against the French as well, lead a regiment of Calvary up north... Did the same in the revolution as well." Pausing as memories flicker to the forefront,

    "Actually I believe your son served under me for a time, back early in the war...

    Edward could not quite recall where, it being so long back.
    James would drink from his glass as Edward spoke.

    He commanded His Excellency's 2nd Light Dragoon Regiment by 1780. Before then, he was a cavalryman in a regiment raised from North Carolina. He fought at the Brandywine and Germantown to the North. I am not too aware of his activities in the North as my regiment, the 2nd American Regiment, the Volunteers of Ireland, fought mainly in the southern theater. It is probably a good thing I never fought my son.

    The elder MacCotter says as he drinks once more from his glass.

    He misses it. I find my son hunting a lot with old comrades from that regiment. I believe he will return to the army, if Congress ever passes the necessary measures to reinstate our armed forces.
    Last edited by Lucius Malfoy; September 17, 2019 at 01:32 AM.
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  18. #38
    Gandalfus's Avatar le Roi de fer
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    Alexander arrived rather fashionably late, just in time to catch the President's inaugural address. Perhaps a little inappropriate for a member of the cabinet, but Hamilton never exactly adhered to convention. At his arm was his bride, the lady Schuyler, followed in turn by his eldest son Philip, an already handsome lad with inquisitive eyes that gawped at the grandiosity of this display of Presidential power. Known to the political establishment, Hamilton was fending off Congressmen and Senators as soon as he had arrived, parrying their fawning with polite rebuttals as he made his way towards the now-President Lionheart, who he had risen from serving as Chief of Staff during the war to now being named as his Secretary of the Treasury.

    "You seem to have things well in hand, Sir. The government does not seem to have collapsed just yet. But there is still time."

    Hamilton japed in greeting, adopting a playful visage of seriousness as he wagged a finger in warning.

    ---

    After greeting the President, Hamilton made his way over to his brother-in-law, Stephen Van Ressenlaer, who he had spotted as he entered mingling with the other aristocratic landowners.

    ---


    The Howards had arrived early, but had spent much of their time mingling with the Marlyand elite; the Governor busily conducting political business with local allies and rivals even during this time of celebration.

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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    "Yes, indeed, he was. I never met someone as determined. He died when I was still a kid, sadly"

    Replied Stephen.

    "But he did talk proudly of his service to the nation and with your father, of course"

    He smiles slightly.

    "My brother-in-law is always willing enough to share his exploits. Mr Hamilton is a force of nature, so to speak"

    Maybe the mercurial Lionheart empathized with the bold secretary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gandalfus View Post

    After greeting the President, Hamilton made his way over to his brother-in-law, Stephen Van Ressenlaer, who he had spotted as he entered mingling with the other aristocratic landowners.
    "Hamilton"

    The powdered hair was itching terribly. And he was sweating a lot under the velvet brocade.

    "Quite an evening, don't you think? How's Betsey? I believe Peggy intended to visit and entertain her this very week"

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  20. #40
    Gandalfus's Avatar le Roi de fer
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    Default Re: Inauguration of Arthur Lionheart, 1789

    "I left her and Philip with our President's wife. You know what she is like."

    Elizabeth could talk up a storm when she was in the mood. The couple were both still young and energetic; the newly appointed secretary being one of the rising political stars of the new American state. Hamilton straightened his collar and smiled ruefully.

    "Quite an evening indeed. I would like to think that the politics would cease for one night, but I truly doubt it."

    He grabbed them both a cup of wine, whatever luxurious vintage Lionheart had procured for the celebration. Probably French.

    "I have already had several busybodies from Congress try and talk business with me. They don't know shame, really."

    Hamilton took a few sips in between words. As usual, he looked on edge.

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