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Thread: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

  1. #181
    Papay's Avatar Protector Domesticus
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by sumskilz View Post
    By what logic do you come to that conclusion? Do you believe lighting a synagogue on fire to protest Israel is not an antisemitic crime? Because that and counting Hezbollah supporters as far-right is the logic the official statistics appear to at least partially be based on. Arguably there are some similarities between fascist and Islamist ideology, but I don't think Muslims are involved in neo-Nazi groups, which makes the official statistics not very useful, other than as fuel for misleading political narratives and conspiracy theories.
    To make you feel comfort there are also dozens of cases of arsons against mosques in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. So should we blame jews and their anti-muslim propaganda? What is your opinion about these attacks?

  2. #182

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen Sylva View Post
    All european jewish synagogues are massive protected, now after the far-right antisemitic shooting in Pittsburgh jewish communities are discussing, if this should be done in US after the latest attacks against US synagogues too.
    That has been the case for years. In my hometown Seattle in 2006, Naveed Afzal Haq walked up to a Jewish community center, said "I'm a Muslim American; I'm angry at Israel" and shot six women. Must have been an anti-Zionist.

    But you may be happy to know right-wing extremists are thoroughly winning the contest in the US thus far: List of attacks on Jewish institutions in the United States
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  3. #183

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen Sylva View Post
    This is nothing more than an antimuslim and antigerman bash thread, which only aim is to spread antimuslim and antigerman propaganda.

    All european jewish synagogues are massive protected, now after the far-right antisemitic shooting in Pittsburgh jewish communities are discussing, if this should be done in US after the latest attacks against US synagogues too.



    Nothing more than hypocrisy from someone, in which country even christians can't live together without being separated by high walls.

    I'm definitely out of this antimuslim and antigerman propaganda thread.
    I'm quite enjoying it. Makes a change from all the "Londinistan" crap about how my own country is a third world hellhole with "thousands" of islamic terrorists running around killing everyone.

    The right have a very "special" grip on reality, especialy the yanks who froth at the mouth, getting all worked up about islam taking over europe.

  4. #184

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Papay View Post
    To make you feel comfort there are also dozens of cases of arsons against mosques in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. So should we blame jews and their anti-muslim propaganda?
    It's preferably best to blame the "Zionists" for everything, using the term "Jews" can lead to awkward media attention.

    Jewish Americans are least Islamophobic faith group, survey finds
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  5. #185
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen Sylva View Post
    This is nothing more than an antimuslim and antigerman bash thread, which only aim is to spread antimuslim and antigerman propaganda.

    All european jewish synagogues are massive protected, now after the far-right antisemitic shooting in Pittsburgh jewish communities are discussing, if this should be done in US after the latest attacks against US synagogues too.



    Nothing more than hypocrisy from someone, in which country even christians can't live together without being separated by high walls.

    I'm definitely out of this antimuslim and antigerman propaganda thread.
    What are you talking about? What hypocrisy? There’s nothing anti-muslim or anti-german in what I’ve said and to be honest it’s insulting you would say that.
    Last edited by Aexodus; June 15, 2019 at 07:14 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    I'm afraid of both far-right terrorism and Islamic extremist terrorism. I'm not afraid of conservatives or Muslims.

  6. #186
    Ludicus's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    You are welcome, Carmen Sylva
    ----

    Back to the topic.
    For those who aren't aware of the latest news.
    Last February. Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt resigns from synagogue
    This is a party that condones the man who committed the largest mass murder in Israel by a Jew.

    Those are all things that I find despicable, and to say it’s just politics is really bad" One of the leaders of Otzma Yehudit hung a picture in his home of Baruch Goldstein, the Jewish terrorist who killed 29 Palestinians at the Cave of the Patriarchs in 1994.

    Lipstadt also condemned Netanyahu for the agreement, which saw Otzma Yehudit merge with other right-wing parties in a joint slate for Israel’s upcoming election.

    She said the deal was of a piece with Netanyahu’s recent tendency to cozy up to right-wing nationalist leaders in Europe, like Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban.
    I like her a lot...she says,
    You listen to Newt Gingrich talking about the Palestinians as an invented people -there was a letter in the Times today saying that if the Palestinians are an invented people, please explain what are the Americans.
    I remember when Hillary Clinton spoke about a Palestinian state in 1998 - the whole world went crazy. People go nuts here, they go nuts
    Obviously, there are anti-semites in the right and in the left,and there are those in the racist far-right who refuse to acknowledge their own intrinsic anti-semitism.
    The far right hates Corbyn, hates the Labour, but Palestine is the crux of the matter. In 2015, Boris called the Balfour declaration "bizarre, a tragically incoherent document and an exquisite piece of Foreign Office fudgerama" (1). Off course, that was before he was appointed foreign secretary in 2106- and now he's changed his mind, and says,
    "In the words of Amos Oz, the Israeli novelist, the tragedy of the conflict is not that it is a clash between right and wrong, but rather a "clash between right and right"...as I have already quoted from the great Amos Oz.That's it, it's a clash between right and right. Or a clash between the wrong and the wrong, as Barbara Liptstad put it:"I want to call each side out and say – you're wrong, you're overstating the case".
    In fact, no side has had a monopoly over virtue in this conflict.
    ------
    (1) The dissenting voice against the idea in the cabinet of Lloyd George was the only Jewish member, Ed*win Samuel Montagu. He was op*posed to Zionism, which he called "a mischievous political creed", and considered the declaration anti-Semitic.Memorandum of Edwin Montagu on the Anti-Semitism of the Present Governement. Submitted to the British Cabinet, August, 1917
    It is worth a read.Almost prophetic,
    I do not know what this involves, but I assume that it means that Mahommedans and Christians are to make way for the Jews and that the Jews should be put in all positions of preference and should be peculiarly associated with Palestine in the same way that England is with the English or France with the French, that Turks and other Mahommedans in Palestine will be regarded as foreigners, just in the same way as Jews will hereafter be treated as foreigners in every country but Palestine. Perhaps also citizenship must be granted only as a result of a religious test.
    Or a genetic test, who knows: Genetic citizenship: DNA testing and the Israeli Law of Return
    ---------
    So, what's going on? a deja vu.We have gained a lot of experience in this field...it's a war that cannot be won-even when we win.
    Just like Portugal in Angola, or the apartheid regime in South Africa, though Israel is winning the battle, it is struggling in the war for world opinion. More than 80% of the world's countries, and almost every country that isn't Arab or Muslim majority, recognizes Israel. That being said, Israel is extremely unpopular worldwide. In one BBC poll of 18 countries, Israel was the fourth-most-disliked nation (behind only Iran, Pakistan, North Korea and Iran). The Country Ratings Poll was conducted by GlobeScan/PPC among 18,000 people in 19 countries between December 2016 and April 2017. World Views .Global Poll | GlobeScan
    Last edited by Ludicus; June 15, 2019 at 07:28 PM.
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  7. #187
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Why are you always talking about Israel.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    I'm afraid of both far-right terrorism and Islamic extremist terrorism. I'm not afraid of conservatives or Muslims.

  8. #188

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aexodus View Post
    Why are you always talking about Israel.
    Notice how he prefaced it with "back to the topic" as if that is even remotely the case.
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  9. #189
    nhytgbvfeco2's Avatar Protector Domesticus
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ludicus View Post
    You are welcome, Carmen Sylva
    ----

    Back to the topic.
    For those who aren't aware of the latest news.
    Last February. Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt resigns from synagogue


    I like her a lot...she says,

    Obviously, there are anti-semites in the right and in the left,and there are those in the racist far-right who refuse to acknowledge their own intrinsic anti-semitism.
    The far right hates Corbyn, hates the Labour,
    Irrelevant to the topic. We are not discussing Israel.
    but Palestine is the crux of the matter.
    No, it really isn't.
    In 2015, Boris called the Balfour declaration "bizarre, a tragically incoherent document and an exquisite piece of Foreign Office fudgerama" (1). Off course, that was before he was appointed foreign secretary in 2106- and now he's changed his mind, and says,
    "In the words of Amos Oz, the Israeli novelist, the tragedy of the conflict is not that it is a clash between right and wrong, but rather a "clash between right and right"...as I have already quoted from the great Amos Oz.That's it, it's a clash between right and right. Or a clash between the wrong and the wrong, as Barbara Liptstad put it:"I want to call each side out and say – you're wrong, you're overstating the case".
    In fact, no side has had a monopoly over virtue in this conflict.
    ------
    Also off-topic. No one even mentioned Boris Johnson.
    (1) The dissenting voice against the idea in the cabinet of Lloyd George was the only Jewish member, Ed*win Samuel Montagu. He was op*posed to Zionism, which he called "a mischievous political creed", and considered the declaration anti-Semitic.Memorandum of Edwin Montagu on the Anti-Semitism of the Present Governement. Submitted to the British Cabinet, August, 1917
    It is worth a read.Almost prophetic,
    Jews were always seen as foreigners in Europe, the Balfour declaration made no difference in that regard. The only thing that it did was finally create a country where they wouldn't.
    Or a genetic test, who knows: Genetic citizenship: DNA testing and the Israeli Law of Return

    So, what's going on? a deja vu.We have gained a lot of experience in this field...it's a war that cannot be won-even when we win.
    Just like Portugal in Angola, or the apartheid regime in South Africa, though Israel is winning the battle, it is struggling in the war for world opinion. More than 80% of the world's countries, and almost every country that isn't Arab or Muslim majority, recognizes Israel. That being said, Israel is extremely unpopular worldwide. In one BBC poll of 18 countries, Israel was the fourth-most-disliked nation (behind only Iran, Pakistan, North Korea and Iran). The Country Ratings Poll was conducted by GlobeScan/PPC among 18,000 people in 19 countries between December 2016 and April 2017. World Views .Global Poll | GlobeScan
    Please explain the relevance of this to the topic.


  10. #190
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    I totally understand Carmens point.
    In rural Germany (attention, personal Experience) you´ll get antisemitsm every day, most times in phrases or insults or people talking bull about jews.
    That has happened the last 50 Years in private or drunktalks ("Stammtischparolen", now those things are said in puplic. Meanwhile the Right wingers try to label all those Antisemitic violence as done by muslims and imported in the last 5 Years... which it wasn`t. It was always here.

    The Official Statistics may be botched, but those of RIAS are also. Those are only looking up Munich and Berlin... Germany is such a divers Nation, you can`t mirror those findings on the whole population.

    @Sumskilz: In res AFD, would you support a Party that has the banning of cirumcision and kosher meat in its programm?

  11. #191

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Morifea View Post
    The Official Statistics may be botched, but those of RIAS are also. Those are only looking up Munich and Berlin... Germany is such a divers Nation, you can`t mirror those findings on the whole population.
    The poll of victims isn't limited isn't limited to Munich and Berlin.

    That's what came up with:

    41% Muslim extremists
    20% far-right
    16% far-left

    The main bias is in that it is limited to cases where the victim came face to face with the perpetrator, so it's not going to take into account most vandalism for example. As a measure of the total antisemitism in the country, it will be biased by where Jews live more. In France, there is a fair amount of right-wing antisemitism, but nearly all the violent incidences are perpetrated by Muslims. It also isn't just committed by Muslim extremists, if by extremists one means Islamists.

    The main reasons why you'll hear more Jewish groups, and Jews in general, talking more about Muslim antisemitism than far-right antisemitism is because there aren't large swaths of society and governments trying to hide the reality of far-right antisemitism. Either they're trying to hide/downplay Muslim antisemitism or they are in denial. Denial about the fact that in trying to salve their feelings of historical guilt or whatever, they compassionately gave refuge to people who happen to include a fair number who'd like to see another Holocaust happen. Plus, it's feeding the far-right antisemitism. They join for anti-immigrant sentiments and pick up some extra antisemitism along the way. Best part, they actually believe it's Jews who are behind the mass immigration.

    Even here on twcenter, someone who downplays the scale of right-wing antisemitism gets mobbed by emotional posts, whereas it's someone who even brings up Muslim antisemitism who gets mobbed by emotional posts. There's accusations of Islamophobia, the assumption that even bringing it up indicates allegiance to far-right ideology, then there's blaming the victims or the eminently rational blaming Israel for the rise of antisemitism and far-right sentiments in Europe. Nice conspiracy theory there.

    Over the past few years France has lost 10% of its Jews to emigration, that is 10% of the third largest Jewish community in the world. Now, 44% of German Jews are considering emigration.

    Germany looks like it's following in France's path:

    Weitzmann had long been troubled by anti-Semitism in France, especially two murder cases French authorities initially refused to treat as hate crimes. In 2006, a gang, led by an openly anti-Semitic Muslim, abducted and killed Ilan Halimi, a 23-year-old Parisian Jew. In 2012, a jihadist gunman opened fire at a Jewish day school in Toulouse, killing three children and a rabbi. However, it was a demonstration in Paris in early 2014 that prompted Weitzmann’s series.

    “The situation for Jews in France had actually been bad since the early 2000s,” says Weitzmann. “Synagogues had been attacked in the suburbs and there were several anti-Semitic murders. But in January 2014, something changed. That month, you had this far-right protest march in Paris called Day of Wrath where you heard for the first time since the 1930s, people crying out anti-Semitic slogans in the streets of Paris. Among them was ‘Jew, France is not yours!’ From then on, you had a dramatic rise in anti-Semitic incidents.”

    The following year, French right wing comedian Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, who has been convicted several times for anti-Jewish incitement, popularized an arm gesture widely seen as an inverted Nazi salute and intended as an expression of anti-Semitism. Some Yellow Vests protestors have used it at demonstrations, a few of which Dieudonné has attended with right wing, anti-Semitic writer Alain Soral, who recently was sentenced to a year in prison for Holocaust denial.

    “At the outset, I wasn’t so sure myself what I was after,” says Weitzmann, who spent three times longer than planned writing the book, interviewing 30 people in the process. “Was something really going on in France, or was I just overreacting to a series of unfortunate coincidences? Was I being rational or was I ceding to that historical anxiety known as ‘Jewish paranoia?’”

    His work on the book was quickly overshadowed by major events in France. A week into writing “Hate,” the first in a spate of horrific terrorist attacks shook the country. In January 2015, two brothers, both Islamic radicals, killed 12 people and wounded 11 others after opening fire in the Paris offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Two days later, a Muslim gunman entered a Jewish grocery in Paris, murdering four Jews while proclaiming himself a member of Islamic State.

    Later that year, Muslim terrorists carried out multiple shooting and grenade attacks on the same evening in Paris in different locations, killing 130 people and wounding several hundred. In July 2016, a Tunisian resident of France drove a truck into crowds celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, killing 86 and wounding many more. Other smaller attacks occurred during that period, some involving Jewish targets.

    The recent rise in anti-Semitism prompted French president Emmanuel Macron to say earlier this year it’s at its worst level since World War II. According to French Interior Ministry figures, 541 anti-Semitic incidents occurred in France in 2018, an increase of 74 percent over 2017.

    Beyond the numbers, certain anti-Semitic crimes – such as two macabre murders – cause greater anguish and outrage due to their particular brutality. Last year, 85-year-Holocaust survivor Mireille Knoll, who narrowly escaped France’s most infamous round-up of Jews during WWII, was stabbed to death and her body partly burned in her Paris apartment. Police, who arrested two men, called the homicide a hate crime.

    In 2017, in the same part of Paris, Sarah Halimi, a 66-year old Orthodox Jewish kindergarten teacher, was beaten viciously in her apartment and then thrown out a window while the assailant screamed verses from the Koran. Police arrested a Muslim neighbor, whose lawyer didn’t deny his client killed Halimi but argued he was mentally unfit to stand trial.

    Weitzmann writes that Muslims are behind most of the major physical attacks targeting Jews in France over the past 20 years, but most are not Muslim radicals, making the matter more complicated.

    “Until the attack on the Jewish school in Toulouse, the difficulty was – and still is, to a point – that most of the murderers of Jews were regular Muslims who were simply overcome with rage, and there’s no way to rationally explain that burst of rage,” says Weitzmann.

    “That difficulty gave an argument to authorities for dismissing the whole anti-Semitic element as non-existent,” he says. “That has changed since the terror wave because people now feel there’s a connection between terror attacks and the rise in anti-Semitism, even when the targets are not Jewish. Judicial authorities still seem to have a difficulty to understand the complexity of anti-Semitism when it’s linked with blind rage.”

    In the book, Weitzmann says certain voices in the French media have a tendency to portray Muslims carrying out homicidal attacks as victims of social discrimination and blame France for not having better integrated them to their new country. They sometimes depict the terrorist rampages almost as romanticized acts of rebellion.

    France is home to 6 million Muslims, the largest such community in Europe, from which more jihadists left to fight in Syria since the civil war began in 2011 than any other Western country.

    Weitzmann opens “Hate” with the harrowing Ilan Halimi case, starting with the deliberate singling out of a Jewish victim. He paints a vivid portrait of Youssouf Fofana, the son of Muslim immigrants from Africa and the leader of the Gang of Barbarians, which during the three weeks it held Halimi in captivity, tortured and ultimately murdered him.

    In 2009, two defense lawyers for Fofana’s accomplices (who had told investigators of their leader’s obsessive anti-Jewish hatred), dismissed the anti-Semitic scourge in the case and in the country at large.

    “Only people with political motivations would try to sell the opinion that anti-Semitism is eating away at French society,” they co-wrote in Le Monde, which Weitzmann cites in the book. “Such a plague, as we all know, is fortunately enough, almost non-existent in France.”
    French Jews face trinity of hate from left, right, and Islamists, says author

    Quote Originally Posted by Morifea View Post
    @Sumskilz: In res AFD, would you support a Party that has the banning of cirumcision and kosher meat in its programm?
    I don't support any political party, but I don't really care much either way about those issues. I doubt the AfD actually cares about them either.

    I heard Eric Kaufman refer to populist parties as being like bootleggers during prohibition. If no one legitimate is selling what people want to buy, someone will step in to profit from that hole in the market.

    EDIT: Basically I share this view:

    Quote Originally Posted by Prodromos View Post
    I wouldn't be surprised if the AfD included a lot of anti-Semitic members. There's a lot of overlap between anti-Semites and disaffected people, so any party opposed to the status quo will attract a disproportionate number of anti-Semites.

    But let's not play dumb; nobody is falling for the far left's faux concern about AfD anti-Semitism, it's purely a cudgel to batter their political opponents with. The far left is no less a threat to the Jewish community than the far right. It's arguably a bigger threat, since while far right anti-Semites are generally widely denounced by society and the government, the same isn't true of far left anti-Semites, who mask their anti-Semitism as some sort of innocent concern for the poor and downtrodden, and insidiously infect universities, human rights organizations, governments, etc. with their hatred of Jews. They're also strongly allied with Islamic anti-Semites.
    Last edited by sumskilz; June 17, 2019 at 09:27 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  12. #192
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    then there's blaming the victims or the eminently rational blaming Israel for the rise of antisemitism and far-right sentiments in Europe. Nice conspiracy theory there.
    What do you mean by this I haven’t seen that here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    I'm afraid of both far-right terrorism and Islamic extremist terrorism. I'm not afraid of conservatives or Muslims.

  13. #193

    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aexodus View Post
    What do you mean by this I haven’t seen that here.
    Not blaming the victims for the antisemitism, but making accusations against the victims for standing up for themselves by talking about the problem. Didn't you notice the allegation that Jews are conspiring to undermine democracy in your country?

    And then there's this, which maybe you didn't catch because it was too incoherent. Never mind whether you believe Orban is far-right or not:

    Quote Originally Posted by Papay View Post
    We've seen many similar events targeting muslims too(especially muslim women). This shows the dangers of Israel allying with far right in Europe
    Quote Originally Posted by sumskilz View Post
    While I can see the merit in refusing to support pro-harassment parties, I'm skeptical that Israel has much if any influence either way on the behavior of individual jackasses in Europe.
    Quote Originally Posted by Papay View Post
    It has influence on people like Orban who attacks Jew George Soros blaming him for muslim immigration
    Quote Originally Posted by nhytgbvfeco2 View Post
    Not everytime someone of Jewish origins is criticised anti-semetism is to blame. Is it anti-semetism to criticise Benjamin Netanyahu?
    Soros isn't particularly loved in Israel either, btw.
    Quote Originally Posted by Papay View Post
    Either way Orban is a promoter of the conspiracy theory that claims that jews want to flood white countries with non white people. And Netanyahu certainly loves to promote him. Well too bad that among far right you wont find only islamophobes but also jew haters.
    The above were all direct replies to each other.

    Israel and/or Jews (Papay never manages to separate the two, hence addressing Jewish posters as "you" when talking about "Jews" or Israel):

    Quote Originally Posted by Papay View Post
    To make you feel comfort there are also dozens of cases of arsons against mosques in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. So should we blame jews and their anti-muslim propaganda?
    And then we have Ludicus strangely posting about Israel in every thread about the far-right in Europe, completely off-topic. What do you think he's insinuating?

    It's all the same kind of classic antisemitism about Jews... uh... "Zionists" being the conspirators behind everything. It's just subtle compared to how the far-right presents the same sort of ideas, but arguably that makes it more effective. Especially when the promoters believe their own BS.
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  14. #194
    Papay's Avatar Protector Domesticus
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYG3pAuGHkw&t=2s


    The well known Israel-loving and muslim hating Katie Hopkins went to Israel to promote her documentary about how muslims chase down jews in Europe. When the co-host brought the topic of far right antisemitism, Katie jumped and tried to downgrade the issue. Just shows how these people use antisemitism as a tool to attack muslims.

  15. #195
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Am I using anti-semitism to attack Muslims? I made the thread after all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    I'm afraid of both far-right terrorism and Islamic extremist terrorism. I'm not afraid of conservatives or Muslims.

  16. #196
    Civis
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    hunting burdock and finding thistle

    https://wildcrafty.wordpress.com/2009/05/30/hunting-burdock-and-finding-variegated-thistle/
    "I could find only two references to silybum edibility. Richard Mabey (UK) said all parts have been eaten traditionally. Tim Low (Australia) says the leaves are still eaten by tribes in Israel and North Africa."

    Either this guy is Jewish or English, best guess. Nations will become a mosaic of themselves, diverse certainly. Nationalism as basically understood as one ethnic group, plus all the various traits and perks that like people tend to share among eachother all the while attributing their successes not to ideological - egalitarian - individuality, but as individuals that attribute to the whole of the health of their nation.

  17. #197
    Ludicus's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Quote Originally Posted by sumskilz View Post
    And then we have Ludicus strangely posting about Israel in every thread about the far-right in Europe, completely off-topic. What do you think he's insinuating? it's all the same kind of classic antisemitism about Jews... uh... "
    ...uh...Good try.I Are you islamophobe, sumskilz? all right, don't bother answering that question, there is no need to embarrass yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by sumskilz View Post
    ...Zionists" being the conspirators behind everything
    I have already said many times, I support israel's right to exist.Ergo, I'm not anti-zionist.
    Having said that, far-right Israeli racists are behind a unholy alliance with their European brothers.Why Benjamin Netanyahu Loves the European Far-Right – Foreign ...
    They share a hostility toward human rights, Enlightenment values, and the European Union.
    And no, it's not offtopic. What am I saying? What Barbara Lipstadt said: Israeli racist government and racist European far right are all the same. Barbara criticized Netanyahu's tendency to cozy up to racist right-wing nationalist leaders in Europe, like Viktor Orban, resigned from her Atlanta synagogue saying she can't associate with organization that condones "such racism, celebration of violence, and immoral policies".
    For our islamophobe right wing residents, and they are many: as we know, there is a working definition of antisemitism.In order to counterbalance the islamophobe impulses, here is "working" definition of islamophobia.
    Exploring Internet-Based Islamophobic ... - MDPI
    Far-right and racist European movements, such as Britain First in the UK and Pegida (Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West) in Germany, often employ digital spaces as the preferred venue to circulate their messages and recruit new members (Wood and Finlay 2008; Allen 2014). They spread Internet-based racism and often contribute to diffuse an image of Islam as incompatible with Western values.
    In order to distinguish between Islamophobia and legitimate criticism, the Runnymede Trust presents eight open and closed views of Islam.
    Open views lead to constructive and founded criticism of Muslim practices and beliefs, and they produce debates that are acceptable in a democratic society. On the contrary, closed views are based on prejudices and hostility.
    For example, a closed view would consider Islam as monolithic and unable to change, while its open counterpart would acknowledge the inner diversity within Islam. The report presents eight closed views that constitute the basis of Islamophobia.

    1. Monolithic: Islam is seen as a monolithic entity that does not change in encountering new realities
    2. Separate: Islam is considered as separate from and having nothing in common with other cultures
    3. Inferior: Islam is deemed as inferior to the West, irrational, barbaric, primitive, and sexist
    4. Enemy: Islam is portrayed as violent, aggressive, threatening, and engaging in a “clash
    of civilization”
    5. Manipulative: Islam is considered as a political ideology, not a sincere religious belief
    6. Criticism of the West rejected: Muslim criticism of the West are rejected out of hand
    7. Discrimination defended: Discriminatory practices against Muslims are justified and Muslims are
    excluded from mainstream society
    8. Islamophobia seen as natural: Islamophobia is accepted as something natural and normal.

    These eight views are symptomatic of Islamophobia because they do not lead to conversations with Muslims and debates about Islam, as open views would do, but rather aim only at diminishing and aggressing Muslims.

    The views are indicators of Islamophobia and they can often be combined together. Indeed, while the Runnymede Trust presents them as separate items for the sake of clarity,
    they actually “are joined together in vicious circles, each making the other worse” (Runnymede Trust 1997, p. 4)
    ----
    Rachel Shenhav-Goldberg,an Israeli living in North America.Her research focuses on anti-racism in Israel and anti-Semitism in North America. She writes,
    By aligning himself with nationalist leaders who foster white supremacy, Netanyahu has abandoned world Jewry in a bid to bolster his own nationalist machinations.
    The common denominator between all these leaders — Hungary’s Viktor Orban, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro, and Donald Trump — is the often-insinuated but at times overt support of white national supremacy. They endorse and employ hate rhetoric, use racist terms, and undermine the rights of LGBTQ people and women. Their true goal is the promotion of the “old order” — demoting the position of and discriminating against minorities, a category that inescapably and invariably includes Jews.
    "All roads lead" to..the far-right.In Germany/Europe or in the US.Why I went to a neo-Nazi website to help me process the Pittsburgh ...

    I opened up the Daily Stormer this morning. For whatever reason, probably because it was too hard to think about the actual massacre inside that synagogue in Pittsburgh, I did what journalists and analysts across the globe do when tragedy strikes: I set out to learn more.What I found were things I already knew but didn’t want to fully believe

    Believe it or not, the article actually decried the murderous attack at the Pittsburgh synagogue on Saturday. Not because the author is opposed to murdering Jews, quite the opposite, but because doing so is not conducive to advancing the cause of white nationalism in the United States at this particular moment.
    "You’re not going to fight the Jews and overthrow the system with random terrorist attacks,” the prominent white supremacist explained
    Il y a quelque chose de pire que d'avoir une âme perverse. C’est d'avoir une âme habituée
    Charles Péguy

  18. #198
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: German Jews warned against wearing kippah in public.

    Do you have anything to say about German Jews Lud?
    Patronised by Pontifex Maximus

    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    I'm afraid of both far-right terrorism and Islamic extremist terrorism. I'm not afraid of conservatives or Muslims.

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