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Thread: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

  1. #1
    cenkiss's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    I am wondering if there were any peoples in history that wanted to actually be romans and join them and discard their previous identity for a roman one and were accepted by romans. Seeing that romans were the superpower, i think many tribes would want to join in and assimilation was the roman way. They may be some that was attacked by their kin or just liking roman ways.

  2. #2
    Abdülmecid I's Avatar ¡Ay Carmela!
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    The Roman citizenship was a very enviable award, especially among the elites. Let's not forget that one of the most violent wars of the Republic, the Social War, began, because the Romans were unwilling to share the Roman citizenship with their Italian allies. Generally speaking, becoming a Roman citizen entailed many benefits with zero serious obligations. Whoever was recognized as a Roman enjoyed fiscal and judicial privileges, while he could also aspire to a remarkable political career in the imperial administration. In the more urbanised east, Roman citizens maintained a very privileged position and monopolised the city's offices, although the latter was more the result of them belonging to the upper classes than a direct consequence of acquiring the Roman citizenship. This is why during the 1st century BC, when the Senate's influence declined, in favour of ambitious generals, the cases of "Romanisation" multiplied, because provincial governors and military commanders were trying to establish a patronage system, composed of wealthy Greek-Roman citizens, whose loyalty to their protector would guarantee that their city would help them, in men and money, in the time of need. The lower segments of the society were less enthusiastic, not due to their sentimental attachment to tradition, but because all those aforementioned perks concerned the interests of the aristocracy and helped the lucky ones in their competition for prestige and political influence against their fellow oligarchs. An impoverished peasant could not hope to reach the office of irenarch, as the ownership of significant wealth was practically a necessary condition, regardless of whether he was named Praxilaus or Gnaeus. If you are fascinated with the subject, you should concentrate your attention on the epigraphical material, which is our primordial source for the matter. Many of the relevant inscriptions have been actually discovered in Anatolia, so the geographical names will be familiar, but the vast majority of them has been examined by foreign archaeological missions, so translations to Turkish will be extremely rare.
    Last edited by Abdülmecid I; May 05, 2019 at 02:48 PM. Reason: Quark.

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    Roma_Victrix's Avatar Gatorade, is it in you?
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    This was rather common by the late Republic. Entire Celtic tribes were granted citizenship in one fell swoop due to wartime alliances and patronage. Caesar himself famously patronized a bunch of Gauls who came from tribes that sided with him during his Gallic conquest and they became literal senators in Rome during 46 BC. There were some Romans who didn't like this, making up taunts and chants in the street making fun of the Gauls, but eventually the xenophobia died down and men coming from the provinces weren't really frowned upon. That was especially the case by the time of Trajan, who was born in Roman Hispania a century later and became the first emperor born outside of Roman Italy.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    I don't think any transition was 100% smooth and without leaving some losing parties behind, but on the whole, "joining the Romans" was a highly desirable thing, not only because of the aforementioned legal privileges, but also (at least in some regions) because of the amenities of the comparatively sophisticated Mediterranean lifestyle the Romans brought with them. As far as I understand, the Roman political system and the way it developed during the expansion was an essential part of the success of the Roman Empire, allowing subject peoples to eventually participate instead of remaining second or third class subjects indefinitely.


    Quote Originally Posted by Abdülmecid I View Post
    Many of the relevant inscriptions have been actually discovered in Anatolia, so the geographical names will be familiar, but the vast majority of them has been examined by foreign archaeological missions, so translations to Turkish will be extremely rare.
    In my experience, at least some of the archaeological reports from the region are available in Turkish, but in any case, one should be prepared to read English, French, or German works to get a better picture.

  5. #5
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    Yes... Also, best thing about being a roman citizen is that you can also be a king of a foreign state, ie. Bosporan Kingdom.
    "First get your facts straight, then distort them at your leisure." - Mark Twain

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    Lord Oda Nobunaga's Avatar 大信皇帝
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    Yes, you can see this occurring along the Rhine. Even with no citizenship it seemed like quite a few were willing to trade their barbaric lifestyle for Roman baths and cities.

    "Famous general without peer in any age, most superior in valor and inspired by the Way of Heaven; since the provinces are now subject to your will it is certain that you will increasingly mount in victory." - Ōgimachi-tennō

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    Clodia_Metelli's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    The Ubii for example were germanic allies of Caesar right of the Rhine. They were later transported to the by Caesar depopulated region of the Eburones left of the Rhine, because they feared the pressure of the stronger Chatti tribe. Win Win for both, as they helped securing the border to Germania.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubii

    Many weaker celtic, britannic or germanic tribes seeked the protection by the Roman Empire.
    Last edited by Clodia_Metelli; May 16, 2019 at 10:59 AM.

  8. #8
    Ludicus's Avatar Vicarius Provinciae
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    Quote Originally Posted by cenkiss View Post
    I am wondering if there were any peoples in history that wanted to actually be romans and join them..
    ..to join them, yes, contributing with soldiers to the Roman army. Well, ask Lupicinus and Maximus what they did.
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    Praepositus
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    Mythologically the Sabines agreed (after a bloody war had been fought to a standstill) to form a community with Romulus' band of rapist thugs. Livy claims its history but he's a whitewashing scoundrel.
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    Not an expert on this part of Roman history, but I'm really struggling to name any. The Romans certainly did have a long list of client kingdoms and barbarian mercenaries, but most of these vassals were assimilated into Roman society either through subsides or conquest.

    Early Roman history though looks to be a little different, and most Latin cities and tribes were probably incorporated over time after longstanding defense pacts. Of particular interest is the Foedus Cassianum in 493BC, a landmark treaty between Rome and the Latin League, yet even parts of this pact gave way to Roman conquest during the Latin Wars. Nevertheless, the period of Foedus Cassuanum also saw several individual treaties between Rome and the Latin tribes, which survived the Latin Wars and led to citizenship. This article specifically mentions the municipia:https://www.jstor.org/stable/639216?...o_tab_contents
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  11. #11
    Lord Oda Nobunaga's Avatar 大信皇帝
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    Default Re: Did any tribe willingly join romans?

    The colonies in Gaul and along the Rhine had a large amount of local peoples.
    The most notable examples in the latter case are Trier and Cologne. Augusta Treverorum and Colonia Agrippina as they were known in that time.

    "Famous general without peer in any age, most superior in valor and inspired by the Way of Heaven; since the provinces are now subject to your will it is certain that you will increasingly mount in victory." - Ōgimachi-tennō

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