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Thread: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

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    Lucius Malfoy's Avatar Pure-Blood
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    Default Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section I. Basic RP and Character Rules

    Starting Incomes/Promotion Money

    The Nobility
    Queen or King - 100000 Dragons
    Prince/Princess - 80000 Dragons
    Lord of a Great House - 70000 Dragons
    Lord’s Bannerman - 60000 Dragons
    Sworn Sword - 27000 Dragons
    Hedge Knight - 12600 Dragons
    Squire - 7500 Dragons

    The Goldcloaks
    Lord Commander of the Goldcloaks - 36000 Dragons
    Captain of the Goldcloaks - 27000 Dragons

    Weekly Incomes

    The Nobility
    Queen or King - Based off land
    Prince/Princess - Based off land
    Lord of a Great House - Based off land
    Lord’s Bannerman - 10,000 Gold Stipend, the rest is Based off land
    Sworn Sword - 18000 Dragons
    Hedge Knight - 8400 Dragons
    Squire - 5600 Dragons

    The Goldcloaks
    Lord Commander of the Goldcloaks - 24000 Dragons
    Captain of the Goldcloaks - 18000 Dragons

    Character Temperaments & Skills
    The Five Temperaments
    Temperaments: Though Westeros is a world without Hippocrates, humorism - the medical theory that an excess or deficiency of several distinct bodily fluids in any given person influences their temperament and health - is occasionally referenced by maesters and septons throughout the Song of Ice and Fire books. They describe the four basic personality types based on the balance of the four bodily fluids - sanguine (optimistic, active and social), choleric (short-tempered, fast or irritable), melancholic (analytical, wise and quiet), and phlegmatic (relaxed and peaceful). There is also a fifth temperament, supine (affectionate and pliant).

    Players will be able to choose one dominant temperament for their characters. From there, two more temperaments may be unlocked (another dominant trait within the same category as the starting temperament and one subservient temperament from another category). The additional two traits are unlocked through consistently roleplaying your character a certain way (ex: A ruthless and hothead character will unlock the Bloodthirsty temperament through consistent roleplay). These will be the basis for the personality of your character in the game. Players are greatly encouraged to try to follow these traits as close as possible in their RP.

    When new characters are born in-game, players should choose their temperaments and personality traits then, and are also encouraged to not choose the same over and over again, which would lead to the same character being played in all but name.

    It is possible to alter a character’s temperaments in-game with mod approval, should a major life event (such as the death of a beloved spouse, defeat in war, betrayal by an ally, etc.) occur.

    Sanguine:
    - Confident: This character is very self-assured, brimming with confidence and difficult to shake even under pressure. However, taken to an extreme, they can show a suicidal disregard for their life and the lives of others, and fail to take...well, failure into account when planning. +1 battle rolls, +1 to rout rolls against this character.
    - Sociable: This character is an extroverted social butterfly, capable of making friends left and right. However, they have little time for 'boring' matters like finances, and are more interested in buying flashy things to show off to their friends than managing their wealth. +1 Charisma, -2% income.
    - Upbeat: Nothing seems to get this character down. They're perpetually smiling and looking on the bright side of even the darkest developments, truly the kind of optimism that can be infectious...or delusional, if the situation is bad enough. +1 to surviving non-battle death rolls, -1 to post-battle rolls (captivity, death, wounding).

    Choleric:
    - Bloodthirsty: This character is hotheaded and loves to jump into fights, lethal or otherwise. This is not something others find endearing off the battlefield, though. +1 Battles, -1 Charisma.
    - Ill-Tempered: This character is ornery and seems to explode at the slightest provocation. While they've gotten into enough fights to toughen them up, a person who's as easily baited as a bull that sees red won't make a good commander. +1 Duels, -1 Battles.
    - Impulsive: This character acts before (sometimes, without) thinking. They might move and decide more quickly than others, but their recklessness can lead them to disaster as well. +5% movement speed, -1 to detection rolls.

    Melancholic:
    - Haggler: This character is obsessed with getting the best possible deal for themselves, and ever watchful (even paranoid) for anyone trying to rip them off. This sort of fellow is rarely the sort others like, but none can deny their ability to sniff for gold. +7.5% income and improves loot from raids, -2 Charisma.
    - Meticulous: This character loves to analyze situations down to the last minutiae before acting. On one hand this means they'll probably have a clear picture going in, on the other their decision-making abilities could easily become paralyzed as they spend too much time analyzing and not enough acting. +1 detection rolls, -5% movement speed.
    - Pessimistic: This character is always looking at the negative side of things. They may be right in some cases - when you suspect every man you meet to be a bad guy, you're probably right at least one out of ten times - but it doesn't exactly make them endearing. +1 to survival rolls, -1 Charisma.

    Phlegmatic:
    - Austere: This character disdains pomp and pageantry, instead preferring a plain & simple (the uncharitable might say 'rigidly spartan') lifestyle. +5% income, -1 Charisma.
    - Empathic: This character is strongly attuned to the emotions of others and cares for them, making them great friends or kinsmen to have - but poor warriors and generals. +2 Charisma, -1 to battle/joust/duel rolls.
    - Reserved: This character is a stoic who generally keeps to him/herself and exercises strict control over their emotions. While this means they're not likely to make reckless moves in court or on the battlefield, they can come across as unfeeling robots to others. +1 battle rolls, -1 Charisma.

    Supine:
    - Amiable: This character is a pleasant person who tries very hard to get along with everyone s/he meets. Indeed, perhaps too hard, at that...they also tend to excessively seek validation from others, and at worst can be described as clingy ticks. +1 Charisma, -1 to duel rolls.
    - Idealistic: This person is a strong believer in higher ideals and the innate goodness of man. On the one hand they tend to be inspiring and uplifting figures, on the other they can be taken advantage of by those who live well beneath their expectations. +1 Charisma, -1 to rout/assassination/escape rolls.
    - Submissive: This character is the sort of person others can easily walk all over. On the other hand, they're generally regarded as beneath suspicion, and if they ever find their spine they could easily strike back without their foes seeing it coming. -1 to Charisma, -1 Battles, +1 to assassination & escape rolls.

    Age 10-18: 4 points
    Age 18+: 6 points

    - Characters may start with a maximum of 6 trait points, even if age 50 or older at the start.
    - Characters may start with a maximum of +3 in any skill.
    - You can gain additional skills via RP.

    Skills

    1. Military Skills

    - Battles: +1 to battle rolls per level. Gained when a character wins a battle where the enemy is not outnumbered by more than 1.2 to 1 and where total soldiers on both sides is more than 6,000 men. This applies per flank, but does not stack more than once per battle (e.g. a character cannot gain +2 for defeating an enemy flank and then the enemy reserve).

    - Pillager: Improves loot gained from raids, see Raid rules. Gained after every 3 raids.

    - Scout: +1 to detecting armies preparing to attack the force the character is in command of, and -1 to enemy detection rolls made on an army your character is in command of. This applies if the character is specifically in command of the scouts (in RP this can be confirmed with anything like 'Scouts', 'Outriders', 'Light Horse', 'Cavalry', anything that can easily be interpreted as being in charge of the scouts) or successfully ambushes an opposing force.

    - Logistician: Armies this character is in overall command of move 5% faster. Calculate total marching time in hours and subtract x%. Gained on request on a per-campaign if moderators feel the character's army's mobility has significantly contributed to a successful outcome.

    - Rearguard: -1 to your army's rout casualty rolls. Applies only if the character is in command of the reserve. Gained if the army the character is in retreats in good order (i.e. the reserve wins their fight with the victorious enemy flank and no rout roll is made).

    2. Personal Skills

    - Survival: +1 to surviving death rolls and in duel defensive rolls. Gained if the character loses a battlefield duel (e.g. no sparring, training, friendly, or tourney duels) but is not killed by his opponent or from surviving an assassination attempt.

    - Personal Combat. +1 to duel and jousting rolls. Gained if victorious in a duel that occurs either during a serious battle situation (a real battle, not a practice fight, tournament melee, training etc.) or if the victor is the winner of a tournament. Can be gained under other conditions if mod approved (highly unlikely). Does not require the death of the other combatant.

    - Assassin: +1 to assassin rolls. Gained if the character assassinates another player character.

    - Wealth: +5% to province income if you are a lordly character or +5% to asset income if you are a merchant character. Gained if the character uses their wealth to achieve something political (e.g. bribery, blackmail, buying someone's death) at moderation discretion.

    - Charisma: +1 to any rolls to convince an AI character to do something. Gained if the AI character is convinced to switch loyalties from any one party to another. This must be a switch of political or military allegiance.

    3. Trait Limitations

    - The Assassin trait is limited to a maximum amount of +2 to prevent overly powerful assassins at the game's start.

    Roleplay Rules
    These are a few extra rules below that just promote fair game play or do not belong under any specific headings.

    Leaving a thread
    All characters who posted in a thread are assumed to remain in that thread unless they post a leaving post or after two full days of non-activity. This means that if you posted in a thread that you were there, and then someone an hour later assassinated you, you can’t claim that you were no longer there unless you specifically posted that you left before the assassination attempt was made.

    Letting Others Respond
    In your posts if they involve actions of other characters it is a rule that you must allow them a chance to respond and refrain from one post wins. For example, you cannot just post "John cut off Jimmy’s finger". You can however post "John went to cut off Jimmy’s finger" as you can see the second version allows Jimmy to respond to your action before you've done it (since you can’t take back a cut off finger).

    Dice Rolls
    All chance rolls (i.e. a birth roll, or an assassination attempt) are based on a D20, and have been done so that regardless of modifiers a natural 1 will always succeed, whilst a natural 20 will always fail. Thus a roll of 15/20 will succeed on 1 - 15, and fail on a 16, 17, 18, 19 & 20. All vs rolls on the other hand (duels, jousts, etc) are based of the highest score wins. A + modifier always improves the roll odds, while a -Modifier always worsens the odds.

    Bastards
    In Westeros there are brothels a plenty and it is known for men to have several Bastards within their lifetime. The surnames of bastards are as follows:
    Storm for those born in the Stormlands
    Hill for those born in the Westerlands
    Flowers for those born in the Reach
    Snow for those born in the The North
    Stone for those born in the The Eyrie
    Waters for those born in the The Crownlands
    Sand for those born in the Dorne
    Pyke for those born in the Iron Islands
    Rivers for those born in the Riverlands
    A Bastard may not claim inheritance, although they can if legitimized by the King.

    - Heirs and Wills
    When your main character dies you must post a will detailing the distribution of your lands, belongings and money within 24 hours of death. Only proper “birth rolled” children and other main characters are eligible to receive anything from a deceased main character. (Note that since you can only have one main character at a time, if you main dies and you have no “birth rolled” heir, all your lands, belongings and money can only be passed to another person’s main character. NOT YOUR NEXT MAIN CHARACTER)

    - Main Character Slots
    Players are allowed up to eight main character slots. Main characters are defined as characters with traits and income. Only six of these may be used on lordly characters, lordly characters being any character sharing the last name of a Lord. A player is limited to having a maximum of two Lordly Houses.

    OOC
    No use of OOC information whilst In Character. Any RP suspected of doing so will be deleted by moderators and the offending player contacted. In addition, if you have a problem with a player take it to a moderator, not the OOC thread or the other persons inbox. Any OOC fighting will be deleted and the offenders reprimanded.

    Birthing Rolls
    Siring Children
    ATTENTION:
    Players MUST post the current ages of the two would-be parents.


    Order of rolls:
    Conception: d100
    Birth: d100 and d60
    Defects & Gifts: d100

    Conception
    Roll a d100. 30% base chance of conception, so 70-100 is a successful copulation. 91-98 equals the conception of twins, and 99-100, triplets.
    You can only have one successful childbirth every 5 RL days. If you fail at conception, you may try again in 2 RL days.

    The would-be mother’s age affects this. Aged 31-35 gives a -1, 36-40 gives a -2, 41-45 gives -3, and 46-50 gives a -4. 51 years and above thus require getting a 20/20 to successfully conceive.

    If successful at conceiving a child, the child will be born in 5 RL days (so if you got the conception roll on a Monday, the child will be born on that Saturday), representing the 9 months it takes for pregnancy to progress.

    Birth Roll
    At that point (or earlier if you like), ask for a childbirth roll. This is one d100 to determine gender, 1-50 is a boy, 51-100 is a girl; and then another d60 to determine the outcome of the birth: 1-5 is death for both mother and child, 5-8 is a stillborn (or similar result), 9-12 is a stillborn that causes the mother to become barren, 12-15 is the mother dead but with a surviving child, 16-20 is the mother and child both surviving but the mother being rendered infertile, and 21-60 are perfectly fine births.

    If the mother is aged below 18, add -10 to this roll. -20 if she is aged below 16. If the mother is 31-39, add -5 to this roll. If the mother is 40-45, add -10. -15 if the mother is 46-50, and -20 if the mother is 50.

    Birth Gifts and Defects
    If the child survived, we roll a d100, to see if they have any gifts or defects.
    If the mother is aged between 31 and 35, add a -1 to the roll. If she is aged between 36-40, add a -2. Each increment of 5 years thereafter is thus worth a -1. Ex. a mother aged 52 gives a -5 to this first roll. The father also has the same effects when it comes to birth defects, and his age effect stacks with the mother’s. So a father and mother both aged 52 gives a -10 to the birth defect/gift roll.

    Roll a d100. Subtract penalties from the age of the parents if applicable.

    1-2 Troublesome Blood
    3-4 Bad Organs
    4-6 Progressive Debilitation
    7-8 Developmental Disorder
    9-11 Autism
    11-12 Infertility
    13-14 Uncontrollable Convolutions
    15-17 Bad Skin
    18- 20 Growth Defect
    20- 23 Misshapen Body
    24-25 Aesthetic Deformity
    26- 60 Normal Child
    61- 80 Healthy Child; +2 against all diseases/plagues and natural causes death rolls. Females get +5 on birth rolls.
    81-85 is a strong child; +2 against all diseases/plagues and natural causes death rolls. Females get +10 on birth rolls.
    86-90 is a smart child; A free +1 to a skill of your choice upon the age of 16.
    91-95 is a genius child; A free +2 to a skill of your choice upon the age of 16 (may also be split up into 2 different +1’s)
    96-100 is a golden god of genius and strength; Two free +2's in different skills of your choice upon the age of 16 (may also be 4 different +1's). Females get +10 on birth rolls.

    Death and Aging
    Death and Aging
    Westeros is rife with disease and untimely death, with infant mortality and an early grave being common thanks to most serious diseases being nigh untreatable. A character ages at a rate of 1 year per in game week, and will, at some point, be subject to various death rolls. These can be divided into two categories: child death rolls (representing the high infant mortality rate) and adult death rolls (representing the low life expectancy of a typical adult)

    Child Death Rolls
    Newly born children have a death roll every five years of their life, up until the age of 15. The chance of death begins at 3/20, gradually scaling down by 1 each time (so that the chance of death is 1/20 by the time the child is on her/his third roll). These rolls can be negated by survival traits, but there will always be a minimum 1/20 chance of death regardless of the survival stat.

    Adult Death Rolls
    Adult death rolls take place at the age of 30 onward, once per decade until the age of 50, when they then occur once per five years. Though the chance of death initially will be very small, this will of course increase with age. As always, the minimum chance of death is 1/20, regardless of any survival traits.

    30 – 34: 1/20 chance
    35 – 39: 2/20 chance
    40 – 44: 3/20 chance
    45 – 49: 5/20 chance
    50 – 54: 6/20 chance
    55 – 59: 7/20 chance
    60 – 70: 8/20 chance
    70 onward: 9/20 chance

    When a character dies, you are expected to kill them off by the end of the in game year. You'll be allowed to clear up any existing situations and resolve them, but following that your character must be declared deceased as soon as possible.
    Last edited by Gandalfus; January 10, 2019 at 10:12 AM.
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  2. #2
    Lucius Malfoy's Avatar Pure-Blood
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    Default Re: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section II: The Feudal System

    Feudal System

    This RPG utilizes a feudal system in order to emulate the ranks and fealty in the books.

    There is nothing of national identity in Westeros, there is some form of regional identity in which a Vale Lord will describe himself as a Vale Lord, but with the exception of the North, Iron Islands and Dorne, Lords to not tend to hold much loyalty specifically to regional identity.

    Feudal Lords regard their liege to be a fellow Lord to whom they owe an obligation. The sort of nationalistic loyalty modern people have to their country does not exist in Westeros. Feudalism operates as an intricate series of agreements held together largely by honour and marriage. Lords regularly see each other as rivals or foes (Blackwood-Bracken, Yronwood-Fowler), even see their own liege as a rival (Stark-Bolton, Florent-Tyrell). A Lord Paramount maintains political control over his lands through marriages and through relying on the social norms that feudalism encourages, not through an expectation of "loyalty to the flag". Feudalism is also very dynastically conservative: though vassals may revolt or seek the overthrow of their liege, it would be most common in those situations to look for a successor of the same line: for example, a rebellion against a tyrant Lord Arryn would, if successful, often result in another (more just, or more controllable by his vassals) Arryn being installed as Lord. Robert was selected as the new King, for example, because he had family ties to House Targaryen.

    A feudal lord who does not overtax or overburden his vassals, and who respects their autonomy, will find it easy to maintain power and loyalty. A feudal lord who weighs heavily on his vassals and often meddles will find they may move against him.

    Granting of Titles
    Anyone who holds a title (ie is known as 'Lord' or 'Lady') may grant those under them titles an/or land. To grant land you must own at least two provinces. You may not promote someone to the same rank as you (ie, if you are a Lord of a House that owns two provinces, you may only make a person Lords Bannerman of your second province).

    Fealty
    Whenever a Lord promotes someone, the person who gains the land is presumed to have sworn an oath of loyalty to their benefactor. In effect, the Lord who grants the land still owns the land, and may demote you at any time. The new lord owns the troops and ships of the land he has gained, and therefore their loyalty. In the event of demotion, if the Lord is unhappy he may rebel with his troops. For game purposes, troops are always considered loyal to their direct lord (ie, if Lord Greyjoy grants Lord Harlaw the province of Harlaw, the troops and ships associated with Harlaw are loyal to Lord Harlaw), though are also sworn to the higher lord (in this example, Lord Greyjoy). In the event of rebellion, a dice roll is performed to find the percentage of men who stick with their direct Lord, and the percentage who fight for their overlord. This only applies to the bannermen of Great Houses rebelling, not in the case of the Great Houses rebelling against the crown, as troops owe no loyalty to the King, only the Lords from the Great Houses.

    Retinue
    A retinue is a symbol of wealth and prestige for a Lord

    Each Lord has a retinue based on the wealth and their Rank Retinues are made up of 50% heavy cav and 50% heavy infantry these are upkeep free
    King has a base retinue of 100 men
    Lords Paramount have a base retinue of 75 men
    High Lords have a base retinue of 50 men
    Minor Lords have a base retinue of 25 men

    The rest of the retinue is calculated by the wealth of their main holding
    Very Rich Provinces- 200 men
    Rich Province- 150
    Very Prosperous Provinces- 100 men
    Prosperous Province- 75 men
    Poor Province- 50 men
    Very Poor Province- 25 men


    Mercenaries
    Whilst on campaign anyone can hire Mercenaries to supplement their armies. You can hire mercenary companies or recruit professional standing armies from their respective threads, but beware of their higher costs.

    Land Incomes for Nobles

    The Crownlands

    Very Rich Provinces (70,000 Dragons)
    Kings Landing

    Rich Provinces (60,000 Dragons)
    Driftmark

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Dragons)
    Duskendale
    Stokeworth

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Dragons)
    Antlers
    Dyre Den
    Hayford
    Rosby
    Sow’s Horn
    Stonedance

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Dragons)
    Dragonstone
    Rayonet
    Edgerton

    Very Poor Provinces (20,000 Dragons)
    Bywater
    Wendwater
    Rollingford
    Sow’s Horn
    Sweetport Sound
    Claw Island
    Byrch Hall
    Brindlewood
    Bramsfort
    Farring Cross
    Greensward
    Langward Hall
    Dalston Keep
    The Whispers (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    Woodmere
    Attadale
    Hollard Hall
    Rook’s Rest
    North Crackclaw
    Crackclaw Barren
    Chyttering Brook
    Byford
    Mosborough
    Sharp Point
    Langward Hall

    The Stormlands

    Rich Provinces = (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    Storm's End
    Stonehelm
    Bronzegate


    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    Nightsong
    Griffin's Roost
    Estermont
    Blackhaven
    Haystack Hall
    Felwood
    Amberly

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons)
    Lockport
    Rain House
    Rainwood
    Galemont
    Summerfield (Summerhall)
    Lapworth (Tarth)
    Manning Hall (Tarth)
    Tarth

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    Lonmouth
    Parchments
    Fawnton
    Grandview
    Gallowsgrey
    Hadlow Keep
    Mistwood
    Tudbury Hall
    Wrathrock

    Very Poor Provinces (20,000 Golden Dragons)
    Amberly
    Broad Arch
    Harvest Hall
    Blue Grove
    Adderdell
    Crow's Nest
    Drakesgrave
    Poddingfield
    Grandview

    The Reach

    Very Rich Provinces (70,000 Golden Dragons)
    The Arbor
    Oldtown
    Highgarden

    Rich Provinces (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    Longtable
    Goldengrove

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    Tumbleton
    The Ring
    Alden Keep
    Redwater Keep
    Horn Hill
    Starpike

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    Grassy Vale
    Dunstonbury
    Wythers
    Ashford
    Yelshire
    Holyhall
    Cider Hall
    Coldmoat
    Smithyton
    Old Oak
    Oakenshield
    Sommerset
    Darkdell
    Blackcrown
    Holeyholt
    Sunhouse
    Bardshome
    Manderford
    Westbrook
    Smallwood
    Derring Downs
    Inchfield
    Brightwater Keep

    Very Poor Provinces (20,000 Golden Dragons)
    Mermaid’s Palace
    Stonecrab Cay
    Harshire
    Hammerhall
    Rose Ford
    Bitterbridge
    Leygood Keep
    Appleton
    Hastwyck
    Dosk
    Redding
    Standfast
    Greenshield
    Ivy Hall
    Catswold
    Greyshield
    Southshield
    Middlebury
    Fawn Crag
    Hunts Hills
    Norcross
    Dunnsbridge
    Dandalon
    Torrentspeak
    Uplands
    Three Towers

    The Westerlands

    Very Rich Provinces (70,000 Golden Dragons)
    Casterly Rock
    Golden Tooth
    Castamere
    Lannisport

    Rich Provinces = (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    Ashemark
    Silverhill
    Kayce
    Crakehall
    Nunn's Deep
    Pendric Hills

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    Sarsfield
    Tarbeck Hall
    Goldshire
    Greenfield

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons)
    Hornvale
    Wyndhall
    Myatt
    Brent Brook
    Peckledon
    Banefort
    Feastfires
    Oxcross
    Riverspring
    Deep Den
    Redbramble
    Tendrig
    Hawthorne
    Cornfield
    Moreland
    Payne Hall

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    Fair Isle
    Drox Castle
    Fang Tower
    The Crag
    Thurrock
    Glitterdale
    Lonmouth
    Maunhill
    Greenmonth
    Falwell

    The Riverlands

    Rich Provinces (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    Harrenhal (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    The Twins
    Blackwood Vale
    Stone Hedge
    Maidenpool

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    Riverrun
    Stoney Sept
    Wayfarer's Rest
    Seagard

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons)
    Harroway's town
    Pinkmaiden (Acorn's Ridge)
    Fairmarket
    Butterwell
    Darry
    Blue Fork
    Red Fork
    Maidstone
    Blackrush
    Lychester
    Goodsbrook

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    Stillfen
    Acorn Hall
    Atranta
    Saltpans
    Oldstones (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    Lolliston
    Branstone
    Rushmoor
    Deddington
    Shoreham
    Esgaroth
    Castlewood
    High Heart
    Willow Wood
    Turnbridge
    Gravesham
    Kanet
    Chiltern
    Martlet Bay
    Wycombe
    Mistlewood
    Cape of the Eagles
    Freylands
    Erenford

    The Vale of Arryn

    Very Rich Provinces (70,000 Golden Dragons)
    Gulltown

    Rich Provinces (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    The Eyrie
    Redfort
    Runestone
    Ironoaks
    Longbow Hall

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    Strongsong
    Old Anchor
    Grey Glen
    Ninestars

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons)
    Heart's Home
    Ruthermont
    Hardvale
    Wickenden
    Gull Tower (Gulltown)
    Gull Hall (Gulltown)
    Moonsgrey

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    Darkmoor
    Newkeep
    Coldwater Burn
    Sunset Keep
    Pebble (island in central fingers sea zone)
    Midlor Point
    Gates of the Moon (Eyrie)
    Sweetsister
    Sunderland
    Snakewood
    Horton (Redfort)
    Wayncroft (Ironoaks)
    Stone Keep (Eyrie)
    Crown Crag

    Very Poor Provinces (20,000 Golden Dragons)
    Littlesister
    Longsister
    The Bloody Gate
    Crab's Shore
    Wycliffe
    Breakstone
    Witch Isle
    The Paps (island in northern fingers sea zone)
    Crow's Barrens
    Scorched Vale
    Timberton (Ironoaks)

    The North

    Rich Provinces = (60,000 Golden Dragons)
    Winterfell
    White Harbour

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons)
    The Dreadfort
    Karhold

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons)
    Deepwood
    Barrowton
    Last Hearth
    Hornwood
    Widow's Watch

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons)
    White Knife
    Deepwood Motte
    Flint Fingers
    Flint Cliffs
    Blue Hills
    Weeping Bay
    Eastmelt
    Last River
    Aylesvale
    Dawnforest
    Castle Cerwyn
    King's Course
    Overton
    Sheepshead Hills
    Wolfswood
    King's Grove

    Very Poor Provinces (20,000 Golden Dragons)
    Seal Shore
    Lonely Hills
    Acorn Grove
    Blackpool
    Torrhen's Square
    Greywater Watch
    The Rills
    Crow's Edge
    Bear Island
    Cape Kraken
    Sea Dragon Point
    Withered Heath
    Whitford
    Arrondale
    Shadowmoor
    Ethering
    Oldcastle
    Fever
    Ramsgate
    Coldgrass
    Moat Cailin (Ruined: See 'Ruined Holdfasts' Rules)
    Oldcastle
    Deepdown
    Kingshouse
    Driftwood Hall
    The Mountains of the North
    The Stony Shore
    Silvereed
    Churwell
    Greycrann
    Pinesend

    The Iron Islands

    Rich Provinces (60,000 Golden Dragons):
    Pyke
    Harlaw

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons):
    Orkmont
    Hammerhorn (Great Wyk)
    Pebbleton
    Lordsport

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons):
    Blacktyde
    Saltcliffe
    Lonely Light
    Stonetree
    Volmark
    Castle Pebbleton
    Sealskin Point

    Poor Provinces (30,000 Golden Dragons):
    Iron Holt
    Seagrave
    Codd Hall
    Axefirth
    Saltford
    Hangmyre
    Grey Garden
    The Tower of Glimmering
    Harridan Hill
    Shield Row
    Nettlebank
    Nagga's Hill
    Shatterstone
    Seastone Hill
    Stonehouse
    Faroar
    Crowspike Keep
    Downdelving
    Corpse Lake

    Dorne

    Very Rich Provinces (70,000 Golden Dragons):
    Sunspear

    Rich Provinces = (60,000 Golden Dragons):
    Starfall
    Godsgrace
    Yronwood

    Very Prosperous Provinces (50,000 Golden Dragons):
    Ghost Hill
    Lemonwood
    Planky Town
    Blackmont
    Hellholt
    Spottswood
    The Tor
    Wyl

    Prosperous Provinces (40,000 Golden Dragons):
    Kingsgrave
    Vulture's Roost
    Salt Shore
    Skyreach
    High Hermitage
    The Scourge
    Ghaston Grey
    Scorched Rock
    Nymerwell
    Prince's Pass
    Red Dunes
    Sandstone
    Elbow
    Scorched Rock


    Vacant High Lordships

    Some High Lordships are vacant in the current setting, with the provinces all directly sworn to another Lord instead. This is primarily Lords Paramount, but for example, House Manderly controls vassals in the Broken Branch region.

    Although the Lord Paramounts may continue to tax lands without a High Lord, it is a good way to reward players with these HLs, especially if there is land available.

    In addition, a House that controls a province or High Lordship directly bordering a vacant High Lordship could be named the High Lords of that region. For example, House Manderly are High Lords of the White Knife, which borders the unappointed High Lordship of the Broken Branch, and thus House Manderly could be named the High Lords of the Broken Branch as well if House Stark wished it.

    Lists of Lordships and Maps

    The Crownlands
    Northern Crownlands

    Northeastern Crownlands

    Southern Crownlands

    Dragonstone

    King's Landing - House Targaryen of King's Landing, High Lords of Blackwater Mouth, Kings of the Andals, the Rhoynar, and the First Men
    - Stokeworth -
    House Stokeworth of Stokeworth
    - Hayford -
    House Hayford of Hayford
    - Bramsfort -
    House Chelsted of Bramsfort
    - Farring Cross -
    House Farring of Farring Cross
    - Dalston Keep -
    House Gaunt of Dalston Keep
    - Langward Hall -
    House Langward of Langward

    Dragonstone - House Targaryen of King's Landing
    - Driftmark -
    House Velaryon of Driftmark. (Sworn directly to King's Landing if there is no High Lord Titleholder of Dragonstone)
    - Claw Isle - House Celtigar of Claw Isle (Sworn directly to King's Landing if there is no High Lord Titleholder of Dragonstone)
    - Sweetport Sound -
    House Sunglass of Sweetport Sound. (Sworn directly to King's Landing if there is no High Lord Titleholder of Dragonstone)
    - Sharp Point - House Bar Emmon of Sharp Point (Sworn directly to King's Landing if there is no High Lord Titleholder of Dragonstone)

    Bywater (Kingswood) -
    House Bywater of Bywater, High Lords of the Kingswood
    - Wendwater -
    House Wendwater of Wendwater
    - Attadale -
    House Pyle of Attadale
    - Greensward -
    House Blount of Greensward

    Massey's Hook (Stonedance) -
    House Massey of Stonedance, High Lords of Massey's Hook.
    - Woodmere -
    House Follard of Woodmere

    Rosby -
    House Rosby of Rosby, High Lords of Rosby
    - Rollingford -
    House Rollingford of Rollingford
    - Edgerton -
    House Edgerton of Edgerton
    - Sow's Horn -
    House Hogg, Knights of Sow's Horn

    Duskendale -
    House Darklyn of Duskendale, High Lords of The Dusk Coast
    - Hollard Hall -
    House Hollard of Hollard Hall
    - Brindlewood -
    House Harte, Knights of Brindlewood
    - Antlers -
    House Buckwell of the Antlers
    - Byrch Hall -
    House Byrch of Byrch Hall

    Crackclaw Point -
    Vacant
    - Dyre Den -
    House Brune of The Dyre Den
    - Rook's Rest -
    House Staunton of Rook's Rest
    - Crackclaw Barren -
    House Cave of Crackclaw Barren
    - The Whispers -
    House Crabb of the Whispers (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    - North Crackclaw -
    House Boggs, Lord of North Crackclaw

    Rayonet (Blackwater Rush) -
    House Thorne of Rayonet, High Lords of the Blackwater Rush
    - Chyttering Brook -
    House Chyttering of Chyttering Brook
    - Byford -
    House Mallery of Byford
    - Mosborough -
    House Cressey of Mosborough

    The Stormlands
    Northern Stormlands

    Southeastern Stormlands

    Southwestern Stormlands

    Storm's End - House Baratheon of Storm's End, High Lords of Shipbreaker Bay, and Lords Paramount of the Stormlands.
    - Galemont -
    House Swygert of Galemont
    - Griffin's Roost -
    House Connington of Griffin's Roost
    - Adderdell -
    House Wagstaff of Adderdell
    - Crow's Nest -
    House Morrigen of Crow's Nest

    Dornish Marches -
    Vacant
    - Nightsong -
    House Caron of Nightsong
    - Harvest Hall -
    House Selmy of Harvest Hall
    - Poddingfield -
    House Peasebury of Poddingfield
    - Blackhaven -
    House Dondarrion of Blackhaven

    Summerfield -
    House Toyne of Summerfield, High Lords of Summerfield
    - Hadlow Keep -
    House Hasty of Hadlow Keep
    - Fawnton -
    House Cafferen of Fawnton
    - Grandview -
    House Grandison of Grandview

    Stonehelm (Red Watch) -
    House Swann of Stonehelm, High Lords of Red Watch
    - Lonmouth -
    House Lonmouth of Lonmouth
    - Lockport -
    House Horpe of Lockport

    Estermont (Cape Wrath) -
    House Estermont of Estermont, High Lords of Cape Wrath
    - Wrathtown -
    House Whitehead of Wrathtown
    - Mistwood -
    House Mertyn of Mistwood
    - Tudbury Hall -
    House Tudbury of Tudbury Hall
    - Wrathrock -
    House Gower of Wrathrock

    Rainhouse -
    House Wylde of Rain House, High Lords of the Rainwood
    - Broad Arch -
    House Staedmon of Broad Arch
    - Blue Grove -
    House Kellington of Blue Grove
    - Rainwood -
    Baratheons of Storm's End

    Tarth -
    House Tarth of Evenfall Hall, High Lords of Tarth
    - Manning Hall - House Manning of Manning Hall
    - Lapworth - House Lapworth of Lapworth

    Parchments - House Penrose of Parchments, High Lords of Parchments
    - Drakesgrave -
    House Musgood of Drakesgrave
    - Gallowsgrey -
    House Trant of Gallowsgrey

    Bronzegate -
    House Buckler of Bronzegate, High Lords of Wendwater
    - Haystack Hall -
    House Errol of Haystack Hall
    - Felwood -
    House Fell of Felwood
    - Amberly -
    House Rogers of Amberly

    The Reach
    Northeastern Reach

    Northwestern Reach

    Central Reach

    Southern Reach

    Arbor

    Highgarden - House Tyrell of Highgarden, High Lords of the Mander, Lords Paramount of the Reach, and Wardens of the South
    - Bardshome -
    House Cockshaw of Bradshome
    - Manderford -
    House Ball of Manderford
    - Westbrook -
    House Westbrook of Westbrook
    - Smallwood -
    House Willum of Smallwood

    Oldtown -
    House Hightower of Oldtown, High Lords of the Honeywine
    - Blackcrown -
    House Bulwer of Blackcrown
    - Bandalon -
    House Blackbar of Bandalon
    - Honeyholt -
    House Beesbury of Honeyholt
    - Torrentspeak -
    House Ambrose of Torrentspeak
    - Uplands -
    House Mullendore of Uplands*sworn to High Gardern
    - Three Towers -
    House Costayne of Three Towers*sworn to High Garden
    - Sunhouse -
    House Cuy of Sunhouse

    Brightwater Keep -
    House Florent of Brightwater Keep, High Lords of Brightwater
    - Norcross -
    House Norcross of Norcross
    - Dunnsbridge -
    House Dunn of Dunnsbridge

    Horn Hill (Westmarch) -
    House Tarly of Horn Hill, High Lords of Westmarch
    - Middlebury -
    House Middlebury of Middlebury
    - Fawn Crag -
    House Sloane of Fawn Crag
    - Hunt Hills -
    House Hunt of Hunt Hills
    - Sommerset -
    House Oldflowers of Sommerset
    - Darkdell -
    House Vyrwell of Darkdell

    Shield Isles -
    Vacant
    - Greyshield -
    House Grimm of Greyshield
    - Greenshield -
    House Chester of Greenshield
    - Oakenshield -
    House Hewett of Oakenshield
    - Southshield -
    House Serry of Southshield

    Old Oak (Oceanroad) -
    House Oakheart of Old Oak, High Lords of the Oceanroad
    - Catswold -
    House Stackhouse of Catswold

    Redwater Keep (Red Lake) -
    House Crane of Red Lake, High Lords of Red Lake
    - Redding -
    House Redding of Redding

    Goldengrove -
    House Rowan of Goldengrove, High Lords of Goldengrove
    - Ivy Hall -
    House Kidwell of Ivy Hall
    - Smithyton -
    House Shermer of Smithyton

    The Northmarch -
    Rowan of Goldengrove
    - Coldmoat -
    House Webber of Coldmoat
    - Dosk -
    House Durwell of Dosk
    - Standfast -
    House Osgrey of Standfast
    - Derring Downs -
    House Rowan of Goldengrove

    Mandervale -
    Vacant
    - Cider Hall -
    House Fossoway of Cider Hall
    - Inchfield -
    House Merryweather of Inchfield
    - Dunstonbury -
    House Peake of Dunstonbury

    Starpike -
    House Peake of Starpike, High Lords of Starpike
    - Ashford -
    House Ashford of Ashford
    - Holyhall -
    House Graceford of Holyhall
    - Yelshire -
    House Peake of Starpike

    Grassy Vale (Blueburn) -
    House Meadows of Grassy Vale, High Lords of Blueburn
    - Appleton -
    House Appleton of Appleton
    - Hastwyck -
    House Hastwyck of Hastwyck

    Rose Road -
    Vacant
    - Longtable -
    House Merryweather of Longtable
    - Roseford -
    House Varner of Roseford
    - Bitterbridge -
    House Caswell of Bitterbridge
    - Leygood Keep -
    House Leygood of Leygood Keep

    The Ring -
    Vacant
    - The Ring -
    House Roxton of The Ring
    - Wythers -
    House Wythers of Wythers
    - Alden Keep -
    House Bushy of Alden Keep

    Tumbleton -
    House Stickland of Tumbleton, High Lords of Tumbleton
    - Harpshire -
    House Orme of Harpshire
    - Hammerhall -
    House Cordwayner of Hammerhall

    The Arbor -
    House Redwyne of The Arbor, High Lords of the Southern Isles
    - Mermaid's Palace - House Goldwyne of Mermaid's Palace
    - Stonecrab Cay - House Quentyn of Stonecrab Cay

    The Westerlands
    Northern Westerland

    Central Westerland

    Eastern Westerland

    Southern Westerland

    Casterly Rock - House Lannister of Casterly Rock, High Lords of Casterly Rock, Lords Paramount of the Westerlands, Wardens of the West
    - Lannisport -
    House Lannister of Lannisport
    - Tendring -
    House Broom of Tendring
    - Fang Tower -
    House Parren, Knights of Fang Tower

    Castamere -
    House Reyne of Castamere, High Lords of the Western Watch
    - Tarbeck Hall -
    House Tarbeck of Tarbeck Hall

    The Crag -
    House Westerling of The Crag, High Lords of the Crag
    - Banefort -
    House Banefort of Banefort

    Ashemark -
    House Marbrand of Ashemark, High Lords of Ashemark
    - Wyndhall -
    House Estren of Wyndhall
    - Thurrock -
    House Ferren of Thurrock
    - Glitterdale -
    House Lorch, Knights of Glitterdale

    Goldentooth -
    House Lefford, High Lords of the Eastern Pass
    - Nunn's Deep -
    House Foote of Nunn's Deep
    - Pendric Hills -
    House Bettley of the Pendric Hills

    Feastfires -
    House Prester of Kayce, High Lords of Kayce
    - Maunhill -
    House Plumm of Maunhill
    - Kayce -
    House Kayce of Kayce

    Fair Isle - House Farmen of Faircastle

    Sarsfield -
    House Sarsfield of Sarsfield, High Lords of Sarsfield
    - Goldshire -
    House Garner of Goldshire
    - Oxcross -
    House Yarwyck of Oxcross

    Hornvale - House Brax of Hornvale
    - Moreland -
    House Moreland of Moreland
    - Deep Den -
    House Lydden of Deep Den

    Crakehall -
    House Crakehall of Crakehall, High Lords of the Crakehall
    - Falwell -
    House Falwell of Falwell
    - Greenmonth -
    House Yew of Greenmonth
    - Hawthorne -
    House Hawthrone, Knights of Hawthorne

    Silverhall -
    House Serrett of Sliverhall, High Lords of the Silver Hills
    - Myatt -
    House Myatt of Myatt
    - Redbramble -
    House Turnberry of Redbramble

    Payne Hall (Gold Road) -
    House Payne of Payne Hall, High Lords of the Gold Road
    - Brent Brook -
    House Vikray of Brent Brook
    - Peckledon -
    House Peckledon of Peckledon
    - Drox Castle -
    House Drox of Drox Castle
    - Riverspring -
    House Sarwyck of Riverspring

    Cornfield -
    House Swyft of Cornfield, High Lords of Cornfield
    - Lonmont -
    House Jast of Lonmont
    - Greenfield -
    House Greenfield of Greenfield

    The Riverlands
    Northern Riverlands

    Western Riverlands

    Eastern Riverlands

    Riverrun - House Tully of Riverrun, High Lords of Riverrun, Lords Paramount of the Trident
    - Willow Wood -
    House Ryger of Willow Wood
    - Branstone -
    House Tully of Riverrun
    - Turnbridge -
    House Chambers of Turnbridge
    - Kanet -
    House Kanet of Kanet

    Harrenhal - House Strong of Harrenhal, High Lords of the God's Eye (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    - Atranta -
    House Vance of Atranta
    - Lolliston -
    House Lolliston of Lolliston

    Butterwell -
    House Butterwell, High Lords of Esgaroth
    - Shoreham - House Wode, Knights of Shoreham

    The Twins -
    House Frey of the Twins, High Lords of the Crossing
    - Mistlewood -
    House Charlton of Mistlewood
    - Erenford -
    House Erenford, Knights of Erenford
    - Freylands -
    House Haigh of Freylands

    Seagard -
    House Mallister of Seagard, High Lords of Ironman's Bay
    - Cape of Eagles - House Mallister of Seagard
    - Rushmoor -
    House Rushmoor of Rushmoor
    - Martlet Bay -
    House Grell of Martlet Bay
    - Gravesham -
    House Keath of Gravesham
    - Oldstones
    (Ruined: See 'Ruined Holdfasts' Rules) - Vacant

    Stone Hedge (Southstone) -
    House Bracken of Stone Hedge, High Lords of Southstone
    - Lychester -
    House Lychester of Lychester
    - Goodbrook -
    House Goodbrook of Goodbrook

    Wayfarer's Rest -
    House Vance of Wayfarer's Rest, Highlords of Wayfarer’s Rest
    - High Heart -
    House Blantree of High Heart
    - Acorn Hall -
    House Smallwood of Acorn Hall

    Blackwood - House Blackwood of Raventree Hall, High Lords of Blackwood Vale*
    - Maidstone -
    House Bigglestone of Maidstone
    - Blackrush -
    House Shawney of Blackrush
    - Fairmarket -
    House Paege of Fairmarket

    Darry -
    House Darry of Darry, High Lords of Trident Mouth.
    - Chiltern - House Wayn of Chiltern.
    - Wycombe - House Terrick of Wycombe.

    The Bay of Crabs -
    Vacant
    - Harroway's Town - House Butterwell, High Lords of Esgaroth
    - Maidenpool -
    House Mooton of Maidenpool
    - Saltpans -
    House Cox, Knights of Saltpans
    - Deddington -
    House Dedding of Deddington

    Pinkmaiden (Acorn's Ridge) -
    House Piper of Pinkmaiden, High Lords of Acorn's Ridge
    - Stoney Sept -
    House Grey of Stoney Sept
    - Castlewood -
    House Harlton of Castlewood

    The Trident -
    Vacant
    - Stillfen -
    House Vypren of Stillfen
    - Red Fork -
    House Strong, High Lords of Harrenhal
    - Blue Fork -
    House Mandrake of Blue Fork

    The Vale of Arryn
    Northern Vale

    Central Vale

    Southeastern Vale

    Southern Vale

    The Fingers

    Eyrie - House Arryn of The Eyrie. High Lords of the Eyrie, Defenders of the Vale, and Wardens of the East
    - Heart's Home -
    House Corbray of Heart's Home
    - Stone Keep - House Stone of Stone Keep
    - Gates of the Moon -
    House Arryn of the Eyrie
    - Bloody Gate -
    House Arryn, Knights of the Bloody Gate (appointed title, non-hereditary)

    Gulltown -
    House Grafton of Gulltown, High Lords of Gulltown
    - Gull Hull - House Hull of Gull Hull
    - Gull Tower - House Shett of Gull Tower*Sworn to house Royce

    Witch Isle (an island off the coast of Runestone) - House Upcliff of Witch Isle

    Runestone -
    House Royce of Runestone, High Lords of Runestone
    - Grey Glen -
    House Tollett of Grey Glen

    Redfort - House Redfort of Redfort, High Lords of Redfort
    - Hardvale -
    House Hardying of Hardvale
    - City of Horton - Mayor of Horton

    The Bite - Vacant
    - Scorched Vale -
    House Blackholm of the Scorched Vale
    - Crow's Barrens -
    House Lipps of Crow's Barren

    The Fingers -
    Vacant
    - The Paps (an island of the north coast of Sunrise Keep) -
    House Elesham of the Paps
    - Midlor Point -
    House Arryn of the Eyrie
    - Sunset Keep -
    House Donniger of Sunset Keep
    - Wycliffe -
    House Wydman of Wycliffe
    - Pebble (an island of the coast of Wycliffe) -
    House Pryor of Pebble

    The Sisters -
    House Sunderland of Sunderland, High Lords of the Three Sisters
    - Sweetsister -
    House Borrell of Sweetsister
    - Littlesister -
    House Torrent of Littlesister
    - Longsister -
    House Longthorpe of Longsister

    Eastweald -
    House Hunter of Longbow Hall, High Lords of Eastweald
    - Breakstone -
    House Breakstone of Breakstone
    - Old Anchor -
    House Melcolm of Old Anchor

    Ironoaks -
    House Waynwood of Ironoaks, High Lords of Ironoaks
    - Ruthermont -
    House Ruthermont of Ruthermont
    - City of Wayncroft - Mayor of Wayncroft
    - City of Timberton - Mayor of Timberton

    Strongsong - House Belmore of Strongsong, High Lords of Strongsong
    - Moonsgrey -
    House Renwick of Moonsgrey
    - Crown Crag -
    House Egen of Crown Crag

    Northweald -
    House Lynderly of Snakewood, High Lords of Northweald
    - Coldwater Burn -
    House Coldwater of Coldwater Burn *Sworn to House Royce
    - Newkeep -
    House Hersy of Newkeep

    Wickenden -
    Vacant
    - Wickenden -
    House Waxley of Crab's Shore
    - Ninestars -
    House Templeton, Knights of Ninestars
    - Crab's Shore -
    House Waxley of Crab's Shore
    - Darkmoor - House Moore of Darkmoor

    The North
    Skagosi

    Northern North

    Northwestern North

    Southeastern North

    Eastern North

    Southern North

    Winterfell - House Stark of Winterfell, High Lords of Winterfell, Lords Paramount of the North and Warden of the North
    - Castle Cerwyn -
    House Cerwyn of Castle Cerwyn
    - King's Course -
    House Cassel of King's Course
    - Torrhen's Square -
    House Tallhart, Master's of Torrhen's Square
    - Dawnforest -
    House Mollen of Dawnforst

    Dreadfort -
    House Bolton of Dreadfort, High Lords of the Dreadfort
    - Overton -
    House Overton of Overton
    - Ethering -
    House Bolton of Dreadfort
    - Highpoint -
    House Whitehill of Highpoint

    White Harbour -
    House Manderley of White Harbor, High Lords of White Harbor*
    - Whitford -
    House Waterman of Whitford
    - Oldcastle -
    House Locke of Oldcastle*
    - White Knife -
    House Wells of the White Knife*

    Moat Cailin
    (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries) - House Stark of Winterfell (appointed title, non-hereditary)

    Karhold -
    House Karstark of Karhold, High Lords of the Grey Cliffs
    - Weeping Bay -
    House Lightfoot of Weeping Bay
    - Eastmelt -
    House Karstark of Karhold

    Last Hearth -
    House Umber of Last Hearth, High Lords of the Last River
    - Seal Shore -
    House Umber of Last Hearth
    - Last River -
    House Umber of Last Hearth
    - Lonely Hills -
    House Lake of Lonely Hills

    The Neck -
    House Reed of Greywater Watch, High Lords of the Neck
    - Silvereed -
    House Fenn of Silvereed
    - Churwell -
    House Marsh of Churwell
    - Greycrann -
    House Blackmyre of Greycrann

    Bear Island -
    House Mormont of Bear Island

    Barrowton (Barrowlands) -
    House Dustin of Barrowton, High Lords of the Barrowlands
    - Fever -
    House Dustin of Barrowton
    - Spearmouth -
    House Stout of Spearmouth

    The Broken Branch -
    Vacant
    - Hornwood -
    House Hornwood of Hornwood
    - Ramsgate -
    House Woolfield of Ramsgate (Sworn to Manderlys of White Harbor)
    - Widow's Watch -
    House Flint of Widow's Watch
    - Sheepshead Hills -
    House Ashwood of Sheepshead Hills (Sworn to Manderlys of White Harbor)

    The Stony Shore -
    Vacant
    - Blackpool -
    House Slate of Blackpool Keep
    - Stoney Shore -
    House Fisher of Stoney Shore
    - Sea Dragon Point -
    House Stark of Winterfell

    The Rills - House Ryswell of The Rills, High Lords of the Rills and the Stoney Shore
    - Withered Heath -
    House Ironsmith of Withered Heath
    - Rillwater Crossing -
    House Glenmore of Rillwater Crossing

    Flint's Finger -
    House Flint of Flint's Finger, High Lords of the Saltspear
    - Cape Kraken -
    House Hayes of Cape Kraken
    - Flint Cliffs -
    House Flint of Flint Cliffs

    Deepwood (Wolfswood) -
    House Glover of Deepwood Motte, High Lords of the Wolfswood
    - Wolfswood -
    House Woods of The Wolfswood
    - Ironrath -
    House Forrester of Blackgrove
    - King's Grove -
    House Bole of King's Grove
    - Acorn Grove -
    House Branch of Acorn Grove

    The Mountains of The North -
    No High Chief
    - Flint Keep (Breakstone Hill) -
    Clan Flint of Flint Keep
    - Pinesend -
    Clan Liddle of Pinesend
    - Crow's Edge -
    Clan Wull of Crow's Edge
    - Arrendell -
    Clan Knott of Arrendell
    - Shadowmoor -
    Clan Norrey of Shadowmoor

    Skagosi Islands -
    No High Chief
    - Kingshouse (Skagos) -
    Clan Magnar of Kingshouse
    - Deepdown -
    Clan Crowl of Deepdow
    - Driftwood Hall -
    Clan Stane of Driftwood Hall

    * - Followers of The Seven.

    The Iron Islands
    Iron Islands

    Lonely Light

    Pyke - House Greyjoy of Pyke, High Lords of Pyke and Saltcliffe, Lords Paramount of The Iron Islands
    - Lordsport -
    House Botley of Lordsport
    - Saltcliffe -
    House Saltcliffe of Saltcliffe

    Harlaw -
    House Harlaw of Harlaw Hill, High Lords of Harlaw
    - Volmark -
    House Volmark of Volmark
    - Stonetree -
    House Stonetree of Stonetree

    Hammerhorn (Great Wyk) -
    House Goodbrother of Hammerhorn, High Lords of Great Wyk
    - Pebbleton -
    House Merlyn of Pebbleton
    - Sealskin Point -
    House Farwynd of Sealskin Point

    Seastone Isles -
    No High Lord
    - Orkmont -
    House Orkwood of Orkmont
    - Old Wyk -
    House Drumm of Old Wyk
    - Blacktyde -
    House Blacktyde of Blacktyde

    Lonely Light -
    House Farwynd of Lonely Light, High Lords of the Western Sea

    Dorne
    Northeastern Dorne

    Northwestern Dorne

    Central Dorne

    Eastern Dorne

    Sunspear (Broken Arm) - House Martell of Sunspear, High Lords of The Broken Arm, and the Princes of Dorne
    - Spottswood -
    House Santager, Knights of Spottswood
    - Plankytown -
    Lord Master of the City (appointed title)
    - Lemonwood -
    House Dalt, Knights of Lemonwood

    Ghost Hills -
    House Jordayne of the Scourge, High Lords of Ghost Hills
    - The Tor -
    House Jordayne of the Scourge
    - Ghost Hill -
    House Toland of Ghost Hill

    - Ghaston Grey -
    Martells of Sunspear

    Godsgrace (Vaith) -
    Vacant
    - Godsgrace -
    House Allyrion of Godsgrace
    - Red Dunes -
    House Vaith of Red Dunes
    - Salt Shore -
    House Gargalen of Salt Shore
    - Scorched Rock -
    House Ladybright of Scorched Rock

    Yronwood -
    House Yronwood of Yronwood, High Lords of the Stone Way
    - Wyl -
    House Wyl of Wyl
    - Vulture's Roost -
    House Drinkwater of Vulture's Roost

    Skyreach -
    House Fowler of Skyreach, High Lords of Prince's Pass
    - Kingsgrave -
    House Manwoody of Kingsgrave
    - Prince's Pass -
    House Fowler of Skyreach

    Hellholt - House Uller of Hellholt, High Lords of Brimstone
    - Great Desert -
    House Uller of Hellholt
    - Nymerwell -
    House Wells of Nymerwell
    - Sandstone -
    House Qorgyle of Sandstone

    Starfall -
    House Dayne of Starfall, High Lords of the Torrentine
    - Elbow -
    House Dwayne of Starfall
    - High Hermitage -
    House Dayne of Starfall

    Blackmont -
    House Blackmont of Blackmont


    Taxation

    A lord can tax anyone directly sworn to them. Kings can only tax Lord Paramounts* (and High Lords sworn directly to them in the Crownlands), Lord Paramounts can only tax High Lords, and High Lords can only tax Minor Lords. You may tax at increments of 5%, 0% with no penalties. For each 5%, below the base you, tax you get +2 to AI call to arms for each 5% over 10% you tax you get -2 to AI call to arms. The king may only tax lord paramount's at a rate of 5% at any time.

    *Note that the Iron Throne will only tax the Lord Paramount directly rather than tax the whole region (Ex: the Iron Throne gains 5% taxes from Storm's End's income).

    Any Lords (regardless of rank) that start off with more than one province may only gain 25% of the total income from additional provinces. Ex: House Strong of Harrenhal controls Red Fork and Harrenhal. As Harrenhal is the main holding, House Strong gains the full income. However, from Red Fork, House Strong gains 10,000 dragons, 25% of the province's 40,000 income.

    Ruined Holdfasts


    The following structures are regarded as 'Ruined Holdfasts' which may be garrisoned by armies but have only +2 to defenses and will last only 6 months (3.5 RL days) if besieged.

    These provinces may be granted to anyone deemed eligible by the Lord Paramount, elevating them to Lord status, but will only produce income and have a levy once repaired to their former glory. It costs 200% of their base province income and 1 year (1 RL week) to complete repairs, after which they become fully functioning provinces in their own right.

    While in their ruined state, any vassal houses (in the case of Castamere) and the levies of the ruined province will levy at the Lord Paramount's command.

    The provinces are:

    North: Moat Cailin
    Riverlands: Oldstones and Harrenhal
    Crownlands: The Whispers
    Last edited by Trot; January 13, 2019 at 10:34 AM.

  3. #3
    Lucius Malfoy's Avatar Pure-Blood
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    Default Re: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section III. Game Systems

    AI Reactions (Including with levies)

    When a player wants an AI character to do something (including raising levies), they must conduct a roll that will determine whether this AI character agrees or not. The base roll is 10/20.

    Positive modifiers:
    - Character is bound to your House by marriage. +15
    - Character is directly sworn to you. +5 *(With conditions, see Note 1)
    - Charisma trait of the character making the request.
    - Moderator discretion, examples...
    --- Character has reason to like or trust the character making the request.
    --- Character is being blackmailed with something, which may alter their willingness.
    --- Character is under threat on their life or position, or their family is, which may alter their willingness.
    --- Character has reasons beyond the immediate conversation to agree or disagree with your request.
    --- The perceived prestige, power or influence of the character making or receiving the request: very powerful people are less likely to be swayed by weaker people.

    Negative modifiers:
    - Character is being asked to fight against his own countrymen (eg Westermen fighting Westermen) (Applies only to High Lords: minor Lords sworn directly to a High Lord ignore this). -15
    - Character is being asked to betray a House their family is married in to. -15
    - Character is being asked to betray someone they are directly sworn to (eg High Lord betraying Lord Paramount, or Lord betraying High Lord) (Only applies when outside forces are asking, such as a Riverman asking a Westerman to betray the Lannisters: does not come into play in internal revolts). -10
    - Character is being asked to betray the King/Queen. -5
    - Taxation. -1 every 5% increment over 10%
    - Moderator discretion, examples...
    --- Character has reason to dislike or distrust the character making the request.
    --- Character is being blackmailed with something, which may alter their willingness.
    --- Character is under threat on their life or position, or their family is, which may alter their willingness.
    --- Character has reasons beyond the immediate conversation to agree or disagree with your request.
    --- The perceived prestige, power or influence of the character making or receiving the request: very powerful people are less likely to be swayed by weaker people.

    Picking a side:
    - Characters have 10/20 chance to pick a side if there are sides to choose from.

    - Modifiers above are counted once. For example, in a rebellion: 10/20 chance of siding with the LP or the Rebels.

    At -15 for killing their own kinsmen, that's -5/20 for siding with anyone.

    Being directly loyal to the LP grants +10, giving a 5/20 chance of siding with the Lord Paramount.

    Any taxation may reduce that chance further: let's assume 5%, thus -2 for the Lord Paramount, putting him at 3/20.

    The Charisma of the 'main rebel' vs the Lord Paramount may increase or reduce the chances: say the main rebel has +5 and the LP +3, that averages to +2 for the Rebel, putting him at -3/20 and the LP at 1/20 (as the Rebel's Charisma makes High Lords less likely to go against him, naturally)

    Therefore, after all that, we have -3 for the Rebels and +1 for the LP. As the Rebels have effectively zero chance, a roll is simply done where a natural 20 would have the High Lord raise for the Lord Paramount.

    If we added marriage into the Rebel house (+15), giving the Rebels a +12 chance of the AI High Lord taking their side, the roll would be 1-12 Rebel, 13-19 neutral, 20 Lord Paramount.

    As you can see, marriage provides a very strong attraction to a cause, and can be the tipping point between having no support or having a few families join your rebellion.

    *** *** ***

    If an AI Lord raises his levies on your behalf in the summer 100% of his troops will take to the field. During the winter time, only 80% of the AI levy shall be raised for you. (*With conditions, see Note 2)

    The Royal Treasury
    All income going to the King does not go to him personally, but rather to the Royal Treasury. This is owned by the King and managed via the Small Council. In order to pay for anything, the Small Council must approve it (which the King can, of course, order them to) and then manage the expense.

    As such, the income of King's Landing itself, any tax revenues from the Crownlands, and any tax revenues from the wider Seven Kingdoms must go through this system. This money is handled directly by the appointed Master of Coin, who manages the Royal Treasury, in the name of the ruling monarch, and ensures that money is readily available for all and any expenditures.

    As the apparatus of the State, rather than the King's personal finances, there are a number of things that must be funded from it and a number of exemptions or special allowances available to the Crown.

    1. The Goldcloaks

    The Goldcloaks must be funded from the Royal Treasury at a cost of 4 Dragons per enlisted soldier. The Goldcloaks may range in size from 0 men to 10,000 men. In addition to this, the Goldcloak's officer corps must be funded from the Royal Treasury, with their salaries determined by the Master of Laws.

    The default salaries stand at 24,000 for the Lord Commander and 18,000 for commissioned characters below that rank.

    The default size of the Goldcloaks stands at 2,000 men, costing the Crown 8,000 Dragons from the game's start.

    2. The Levies and Ships.

    The Treasury must pay for the King's levies and ships that he has raised.

    3. Spies

    The Master of Whispers, or indeed any character who can acquire a budget from the Small Council and thinks they can get away with it, needs to operate spies for the good of the realm.

    4. Salaries

    Members of the Small Council are oftentimes landed Lords with incomes of their own already, but that is not always true nor is it true of everyone in Royal service. Anyone seeking a salary from the Crown for their efforts must acquire it from the Royal Treasury. This could mean the Small Council itself, or those characters sworn to its service, or people the King or Small Council wish to grant a stipend to for any other reason.

    5. Tourneys and Feasts

    The Royal Treasury may fund Tourneys and Feasts as the King or Hand direct.

    6. Construction

    Any buildings built for King's Landing, or any other projects the Crown wishes to embark on, must have their funding sourced from the Royal Treasury.

    The Small Council and the Royal Court
    The Small Council are a group of close advisors maintained by the King to assist him in running the Kingdoms. There is no set membership within the Council nor are there any set roles, though there are roles that are commonly found upon the Council. The default set up of the Council is as follows.

    1. The Hand of the King

    The King's right hand, charged to act in his stead where he cannot. Empowered to act effectively with the authority of a Lord Paramount within the Crownlands, and able to speak with the King's authority to other Lords and Lords Paramount, the Hand of the King is the most powerful position in the realm beneath the King himself. Many Kings disinterested in statecraft have allowed their Hands to effectively rule in their name. The Hand will act as the chairman of the Small Council if the King is not present.

    The Hand of the King also de facto acts as the King's Marshal, commanding his armies if he does not do so himself.

    2. The Master of Coin

    There must always be someone charged with actually ensuring there is money flowing into the Royal Treasury, and that often falls to a Master of Coin. Tasked with ensuring taxes are collected and keeping the King and Small Council well informed on the Crowns incomes and expenses, the Master of Coin enjoys a position of considerable trust: all information on Royal finances ultimately comes from him.

    The Master of Coin may request, on any income day (Friday) for a d20 roll on variations on Royal Income. A roll of 1-10 will reduce that year's tax take by [10%-d20], and a roll of 11-20 will increase that year's tax take by a roll of [20%-d20]. For example, a roll of 15 will increase the tax take by 20-15 = 5%, while a roll of 3 will decrease that year's tax take by 10-3 = 7%. This roll may be improved by the Wealth trait, and may go above 20 if the trait bonus allows it.

    Small variations in the yearly tax take are entirely normal, and it shall not be permitted IC to suspect wrongdoing on the Master of Coin's part purely as a result of this roll request producing more or less money.

    3. The Master of Laws

    The man in charge of royal justice and the city's Goldcloaks. He is tasked with maintaining the Goldcloaks and with advising the King on legal matters. He has the right to sit in judgement at any trial alongside the Hand of the King unless the Hand or King expressly forbid it, and may appoint the third judge, again unless the Hand or the King appoint one themselves.

    Though the Hand and the King have the authority to overrule the Master of Laws on these matters, the position carries with it an implication of legal expertise, and as such the Master of Laws should expect his counsel to at least be respected.

    The Master of Laws is also nominally the master of the Goldcloaks: he controls their budget and the pay of its officers, making him a potentially powerful man in the City of King's Landing if the Hand or the King cannot control him or do not replace him. He may give orders to the Goldcloaks, including having people arrested or banished from the city, and may send any number of the Goldcloaks out of the city on Royal business. The Goldcloaks will be very reluctant to form part of a campaigning army, though: they're not soldiers.

    4. The Master of Ships

    Where most nobles in Westeros are familiar with waging war on land, few are familiar with waging war at sea. As such, the Admiral of the King's Navy is often represented on the Small Council due to this niche knowledge.

    The Master of Ships controls the Royal Navy and is responsible for purchasing and maintaining the ships, and controlling their movements.

    5. The Master of Whispers

    An unforgiving position but potentially a powerful one. The Master of Whispers is the man often charged with recruiting and maintaining spies and informants within the Seven Kingdoms and abroad. The Master of Whispers is tasked with paying for spies and directing their activities, and also with using the resources and influence he may have to convince others to yield their secrets or inform upon others.

    6. Grand Maester (NPC)

    The Grand Maester is the Red Keep's Maester and is regarded as ranking above any other Maester except the Conclave, which alone holds the power to dismiss him. He is supposed to be an experienced and knowledgeable man whose wisdom can be consulted. As with all Maesters, his duties are the tending of ravens, dispensing of medicine, and giving wise counsel to the Crown.

    The Royal Court
    Besides the major appointments of the Small Council, there are a number of various lesser positions available for the ruling monarch that can be granted as appointments to various persons. Among these lesser courtly positions, there is Keeper of the Keys, Chief Steward of the Red Keep, Understewards, Harbormaster of Kings Landing, Warden of the Kings Mint, Kings Justice, the Lord Confessor, the Master-at-Arms, and Master of Horse. These appointments can be granted to anyone who has shown great service and loyalty to the Iron Throne.

    Marriages and Dowries

    Introduction

    Marriages were political among Westerosi nobility: few married for love. Due to the feudal nature of Westerosi society, marriages were the most secure and enduring way to form alliances between families, something that was crucial both in social advancement and in protecting oneself: a family with no friends was vulnerable to attempts to seize their lands and titles by subterfuge.

    With this in mind, marriages can only be seen as political: two families were agreeing to support and cooperate with each other, militarily if necessary. Lords Paramount would most regularly marry their sons and daughters to prominent Bannermen from within their own realm in order to shore up support, or to well-regarded suitors from elsewhere (Princes, tourney champions, wealthy noble families in order to secure a good dowry).

    Lords Paramount forming marriage alliances with other Lords Paramount would be seen by the Crown as a deliberate statement, and likely as a threat: two Kingdoms forming so close a bond would lessen the Crown's ability to control them.

    Rules

    Due to how political marriages are, a few rules need to be established to best allow players to exploit this and to react to other marriages.

    1. Betrothals must be announced in the realm-wide announcement thread. Once announced, the marriage may take place 72 hours (3 RL days) afterwards. This is to allow other players to react, either in arranging their own counter-betrothals or in attempting to sabotage your own (convincing the Faith to declare the marriage void for some fabricated reason, trying to get the son forced to the Night's Watch or Kingsguard, so on...).

    2. The party providing the bride must also provide a dowry. The dowry expected by AI Lords (as a guide for players) will be calculated as follows:

    - For players of the same rank (eg High Lord family marrying into High Lord family), the dowry will be 25% of the husband's family's yearly province income. (eg for a 60,000 Dragon province, the bride's family will be expected to provide 15,000 Dragons as a dowry).

    - For a 1 rank difference (eg Minor Lord marrying into High Lord), the dowry will be 75% of the husband's family's yearly income (eg 45,000 Dragons).

    - For a 2 rank difference (eg a Knight marrying into a High Lord family), the dowry will be 150% of the husband's family's income (eg 90,000 Dragons).

    - Lords with a land income above 30,000 Dragons will not normally consider allowing a non-noble to wed their children. If this comes up, moderators will deal with it on a case-by-case basis, but be warned we must start from a position of rejecting the request unless an excellent case can be provided for it. For very poor minor Lords it was not uncommon for marriages of their daughters to wealthy merchants to be arranged, but for wealthy Lords, High Lords, and Lords Paramount it would normally be a source of considerable embarrassment for one of their children to marry a commoner.

    - Something of similar value may also be accepted, with moderators treating partial or entire non-monetary dowries on a case by case basis.

    Bear in mind that provision of the dowry doesn't mean the marriage will be agreed to. Families were always striving to marry at or above their station. As such, a family accepting a marriage from a lower station would need to be convinced of the merits of such an alliance. This naturally doesn't apply to Lords Paramount, who by convention would normally form marriages with their prominent Bannermen or prominent Houses from other Kingdoms.

    Basic Rules for Rping in Essos


    We will be allowing some limited RP in Essos but the majority of your RP must still happen in Westeros. This limited RP can include things like trade expeditions, a search for items or people, raiding expeditions, or other RPs (that must be moderator approved).

    However, before you begin all of your RPs, you need to PM a moderator with your intentions if it is not something simple like trade expeditions or raiding. Please include in your PM the following:

    Setting: where you will be in Essos
    Goal: what do you plan to accomplish?
    Those Involved: Who will be joining you in the RP. I don't want to see random people just jumping in the RP unless it makes sense. I have seen it happen before and it is annoying.
    Moderator Notes: What you need from us moderators.

    The mod team reserves the right to reject your proposed RP.

    In addition, there will be a cap of 5 total Essosi Rps at one time (trade expeditions do not count). We only have a limited number of moderators who only have so much time available so we will have a limit to prevent the mods from being overwhelmed. This number was determined from the fact that we also have Rps in Westeros to moderate and 5 is a more than fair number once that is taken into consideration.
    Last edited by Lucius Malfoy; January 10, 2019 at 09:28 AM.
    Gaming Director for the Gaming Staff
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  4. #4
    Lucius Malfoy's Avatar Pure-Blood
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    Default Re: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section IV. Military Rules - Mustering

    Land Levy, How to Muster, and Compositions
    Levy
    Levies are what makeup armies of the feudal lords and ladies of the Seven Kingdoms. These levies are composed of both peasants, armed with spears and swords, going up to gentry and local nobility that supply heavier infantry and knights to serve their overlords. This makes up the basic structure, and overall composition, of an army of any region of the Seven Kingdoms.

    Mobilizing time: 12 hours

    Mobilizing numbers: 20%+D20*4% (This applies only to AI Levies, your own levy will always muster at 100% strength)

    Cost: 5 Dragons per point mobilized per week. Pay when the Levy is ready to march to war (eg if Banners are called on Monday, Levy is ready to go on Tuesday, so pay on Tuesday) and exactly 1 week later if the Levy is still raised (eg the next Tuesday). Levies will not stay in the field for a third week or more.

    Who knows: If any Lord calls only their own Levy (including Levies of minor Lords sworn directly to them) then everyone inside their "Kingdom" (eg the Westerlands) will know immediately. If the Lord Paramount calls the Levy of more than half his High Lords, all Westeros knows immediately. If he calls less than half, they know in 24 hours.

    Cooldown Time: If the Levy is sent home within 7 days of being mobilized, it cannot be raised for 7 days after being sent home. If the Levy is sent home 8+ days after being mobilized, it cannot be raised again for 14 days after being sent home.

    Levy Composition
    Each levy is pre-arranged, according to the composition below, for all the Seven Kingdoms, save the North:

    40% Light Infantry
    20% Archers
    20% Men-at-Arms (or Heavy Infantry)
    10% Light Cavalry
    10% Knights (or Heavy Cavalry)

    The Northern levies are different and are built as follows:

    30% Light Infantry
    20% Archers
    40% Men-at-Arms (or Heavy Infantry)
    5% Light Cavalry
    5% Knights (or Heavy Cavalry)

    This is to better reflect the North have a forte in more heavier infantry and larger amounts of archers.

    Provincial Levy numbers
    The Crownlands Levy - 18,500 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    King's Landing

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Duskendale
    Rosby
    Dragonstone
    Bywater
    Rayonet
    Stonedance

    Small Levy - 500 men
    Driftmark
    Antlers
    Stokeworth
    Edgerton
    Hayford
    Woodmere
    Byrch Hall
    Brindlewood
    Hollard Hall
    Langward Hall
    Dalston Keep

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    Sharp Point
    North Cracklaw
    Sow's Horn
    Crackclaw Barren
    Dyre Den
    Rook's Rest
    The Whispers (Ruined, see 'Ruined Holdfast' rules for inquiries)
    Claw Island
    Rollingford
    Bramsfort
    Farring Cross
    Chyttering Brook
    Byford
    Mosborough
    Attadale
    Greensward
    Wendwater
    Sweetport Sound
    The Stormlands Levy - 34,250 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    Storm’s End
    Blackhaven
    Nightsong
    Tarth
    Parchments
    Bronzegate
    Stonehelm

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Gallowsgrey
    Summerfield (Summerhall)
    Griffin's Roost
    Rain House
    Estermont

    Small Levy - 500 men
    Harvest Hall
    Haystack Hall
    Rainwood
    Felwood
    Grandview
    Amberly
    Drakesgrave
    Poddingfield
    Lapworth (Tarth)
    Manning Hall (Tarth)

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    Galemont
    Mistwood
    Fawnton
    Lonmouth
    Lockport
    Tudbury Hall
    Wrathrock
    Wrathtown
    Broad Arch
    Blue Grove
    Adderdell
    Crow's Nest
    Hadlow Keep
    Lonmouth
    The Reach Levy - 78,000 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    Highgarden
    Oldtown
    Goldengrove
    Horn Hill
    Starpike
    The Arbor
    Brightwater Keep
    Tumbleton
    The Ring

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Oakenshield
    Cider Hall
    Bitterbridge
    Grassy Vale
    Longtable
    Old Oak
    Redwater Keep
    Derring Downs
    Three Towers
    Bandalon
    Uplands
    Westbrook
    Manderford
    Appleton
    Greenshield
    Honeyholt
    Torrentpeak
    Middlebury
    Bardshome
    Sommerset
    Hammerhall
    Wythers
    Hastwyck
    Coldmoat
    Darkdale
    Holy Hall
    Blackcrown
    Ivy Hall
    Sunhouse
    Norcross
    Dunbridge
    Hunt Hills
    Greyshield
    Southshield
    Standfast
    Smithyton
    Catswold
    Redding
    Dosk
    Inchfield
    Yelshire
    Roseford
    Leygood Keep
    Alden Keep
    Harpshire
    Mermaid's Palace
    New Barrel
    Ashford
    The Westerlands Levy - 48,000 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    Casterly Rock
    Goldentooth
    Castamere
    Silverhall
    Ashemark
    Crakehall
    Sarsfield

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Payne Hall
    Lannisport
    Nunn's Deep
    Fair Isle
    The Crag
    Cornfield
    Hornvale
    Kayce
    Tarbeck Hall
    Feastfires
    Greenfield
    Wyndhall
    Goldshire
    Greenmonth
    Myatt
    Riverspring
    Glitterdale
    Maunhill
    Deep Den
    Tendrig
    Fallwell
    Hawthorne
    Redbramble
    Brent Brook
    Peckledon
    Lonmont

    Small-500
    Fawn Crag
    Pendric Hills
    Fang Tower
    Banefort
    Drox Castle
    Moreland
    Oxcross
    Thurock
    The Riverlands Levy - 45,000 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    The Twins
    Riverrun
    Harrenhal (Ruined: See 'Ruined Holdfasts' Rules)
    Blackwood Vale
    Stonehedge
    Wayfarer's Rest
    Seaguard

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Darry
    Maidenpool
    Fairmarket
    Butterwell
    Pinkmaiden (aka Acorn's Ridge)
    Maidstone
    Goodsbrook
    Acorn Hall
    High Heart
    Lychester

    Small Levy - 500 men
    Saltpans
    Stoney Sept
    Stillfen
    Oldstones (Ruined: See 'Ruined Holdfasts' Rules)
    Willow Wood
    Lolliston
    Turnbridge
    Blue Fork
    Chilltern
    Rushmoor
    Gravesham
    Shoreham
    Harroway's town
    Branston
    Kanet
    Blackrush
    Red Fork
    Deddington
    Wycombe
    Atranta
    Martlet Bay
    Medway
    Esgaroth
    Castlewood
    Mistlewood
    Cape of the Eagles
    Freylands
    Erenford
    The Vale of Arryn Levy - 39,000 men

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    The Eyrie
    Runestone
    Redfort
    Longbow Hall
    Gulltown
    Strongsong
    Ironoaks

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Wikenden
    NewKeep
    Ninestars
    Grey Glen
    Hardvale
    Snakewood
    Heart's Home

    Small Levy - 500 men
    Scortched Vale
    Old Anchor
    Sweetsister
    Ruthermont
    Gull Tower
    Horton
    Breakstone
    Wayncroft
    Stone Keep
    Gull Hall
    Timberton
    Darkmoor
    Witch Isle
    Coldwater Burn

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    Wycliff
    The Paps (island in northern fingers sea zone)
    Gate of the Moon
    The Bloody Gate
    Crabshore
    Monnsgrey
    Crown Crag
    Crow's Barrens
    Sunset Keep
    Pebble (island in central fingers sea zone)
    Midlor Point
    Littlesister
    Longsister
    Sunderland
    The North Levy - 38,000

    Large Levy - 3,000 men
    Winterfell
    White Harbour
    Karhold
    The Dreadfort
    Last Hearth
    Barrowtown

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Flint's Finger (aka Flint's Keep)
    Deepwood Motte
    The Rills
    Greywater Watch
    Hornwood
    Widow's Watch
    The Mountains of the North

    Small Levy – 500 men
    Torrhen's Square
    Bear Island
    Shadowmoor
    White Knife
    Moat Cailin (Ruined: See 'Ruined Holdfasts' Rules)
    Oldcastle
    Pine Send
    Castle Cerwyn
    Crow's Edge

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    Kingshouse
    Deepdown
    Driftwood Hall
    Silvereed
    Churwell
    Greycronn
    Cape Kraken
    Fever
    Coldgrass
    Ramsgate
    Whitford
    Ethering
    Blazewater
    Stoney Shore
    Blue Hills
    Sea Dragon Point
    Withered Heath
    Weeping Bay
    Eastmelt
    Seal Shore
    Last River
    Aylesvale
    Dawnforest
    King's Course
    Overton
    Sheepshead Hills
    Lonely Hills
    Wolfswood
    Blackgrove
    King's Grove
    Acorn Grove
    Tine's End
    Arrondale
    Flint Cliffs
    Iron Islands Levy - 19,250 men

    Large Levy - 3,000
    Pyke
    Orkmont

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Harlaw
    Hammerhorn (Great Wyk)
    Drumm Tower (Old Wyk)
    Blacktyde
    Saltcliffe
    Lonely Light

    Small Levy - 500 men
    Stonetree
    Volmark
    Castle Pebbleton
    Sealskin Point

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    City of Pebbleton
    City of Lordsport
    Iron Holt
    Seagrave
    Codd Hall
    Axefirth
    Saltford
    Hangmyre
    Grey Garden
    The Tower of Glimmering
    Harridan Hill
    Shield Row
    Nettlebank
    Nagga's Hill
    Shatterstone
    Seastone Hill
    Stonehouse
    Faroar
    Crowspike Keep
    Downdelving
    Corpse Lake
    Dorne Levy - 16,000 men

    Large Levy - 3,000
    Sunspear
    Yronwood

    Medium Levy - 1,000 men
    Starfall
    Godsgrace
    Skyreach

    Small Levy - 500 men
    The Tor
    Ghost Hill
    Kingsgrave
    Prince's Pass
    Plankytown
    Spottswood
    Hellholt

    Very Small Levy - 250 men
    Wyl
    Blackmont
    High Hermitage
    Ghaston Grey
    Nymerwell
    Vulture's Roost
    Salt Shore
    Sandstone
    Elbow
    Great Desert (Bromholt)
    Red Dunes
    Lemonwood
    The Scourge
    Scorched Rock

    Garrisons

    All castles have a basic garrison depending on their size. This is only a small number of men, representing the bare minimum that is left behind to guard the castle when the lord goes off to war.

    Small: 25 Men
    Medium: 50 Men
    Large: 75 Men

    The basic garrison may be increased through building upgrades, but this will only be by a marginal amount. A lord will have to weigh the risk of his fortress being captured against how large he wishes his force to be - it may be prudent to leave a portion of the levy behind to bolster the garrison if there is a possibility your castle may come under attack.

    There are instances of a city watch existing in Westeros, but these are few and far between. The extant ones and their numbers are listed below.

    The Goldcloaks (King's Landing): 1000 Archers, 1000 Light Infantry
    Oldtown City Watch: 750 Archers, 750 Light Infantry
    Lannisport, White Harbor, and Gulltown City Watch: 500 Archers, 500 Light Infantry

    Naval Levies

    Most Lords of Westeros do not operate their own dedicated naval forces, and instead rely on pressing merchant ships and fishing boats. A select few also operate warships, though this is dependent on their history as a naval power.

    The Crownlands

    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Large Fleet: 100 Ships
    Driftmark

    Medium Fleet: 50 Ships
    King's Landing

    Small fleet: 20 Ships
    Claw Isle
    Dragonstone
    Sweetport Sound
    Sharp Point
    Duskendale

    The Stormlands
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Island Fleet: 15 ships
    Tarth
    Esermont
    Lonmouth

    The Reach
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Large Fleet: 100 Ships
    The Arbor

    Medium Fleet: 50 Ships
    Oldtown

    Small Fleet: 20 Ships
    Greenshield
    Oakenshield
    Southshield
    Greyshield

    Westerlands
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Medium Fleet: 50 Ships
    Lannisport

    Small Fleet: 20 Ships
    Fair Isle

    The Riverlands
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Small Fleet: 25
    Cape of Eagles/Seagard

    The Vale
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Medium Fleet: (50 ships)
    Gulltown

    The North
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Medium Fleet: 30 Ships
    White Harbour

    Dorne
    Ship levy composition:
    5% heavy ship
    25% galleys
    30% dromonds
    40% levy ships

    Small Fleet: 25 ship
    Sunspear

    Army Limitations


    General Rules

    - All armies must march and camp separately (be at least three hexes apart).

    - Armies can come together in a location and fight (though this would require exquisite timing to actually work as well as some RP).

    - Fleets may not number more than 250 ships and follow the same rules as the armies do.

    - During Summer, you will have access to 100% of your levy points.

    - During Winter, you will only have 80% of your levy points available for you to use. The unused points/men do not add to garrison size and these men are considered to just not show up due to the weather conditions.

    Land Army Sizes

    Small Army
    Size: 1-10,000 men
    Bonus: +10% movement speed
    Bonus: Unless the commander specifically states the army is defending a certain location and won't retreat (laying siege counts as making that statement), the army will automatically retreat from any army larger than 10,000 men. It will retreat either in the direction it came from or towards safety, at the mod's discretion.

    Medium Army
    Size: 10,001-25,000 men
    Bonus: Unless the commander specifically states the army is defending a certain location and won't retreat (laying siege counts as making that statement), the army will automatically retreat from any army larger than 25,000 men. It will retreat either in the direction it came from or towards safety, at the mod's discretion.

    Large Army
    Size: 25,001-35,000 men
    Penalty: Due to the sheer size of these armies, their presence is known far and wide while on the march. They will be detected automatically by all holdfasts, characters, and armies in a 2 province radius. In practice, this means if you can reach the province this army is in from where you are by passing through only one other province, you will know the army is there. You will also know what direction they're marching in (but not necessarily the destination).

    Last edited by chesser2538; January 24, 2019 at 03:49 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section V. Military Rules - Fighting

    Campaigning I (Scouting)
    - Scouting can only be requested if Light Cavalry is in the army.
    - You may only scout one province per 250 Light Cavalry in the army per 24 hours. If, for example, you have 499 Light Cavalry, you may only scout one province.

    When scouting is requested, the mods do one D20 roll with the following possible results:

    1-4/20 - Scouts captured by the enemy -The scouts are captured and may now be tortured for information.
    5-10/20 - Scouts fail to return with any information
    11-12/20 - Scouts return with 20% accurate range - Mods post back a wide range of possible army numbers (20% accuracy)
    13-14/20 - Scouts return with 40% accurate range - Mods post back a narrower range of possible army numbers (40% accuracy)
    15-16/20 - Scouts return with 60% accurate range - Mods post back a small range of possible army numbers (60% accuracy)
    17-18/20 - Scouts return with 80% accurate range - Mods post back a ting range of possible army numbers (80% accuracy)
    19-20/20 - Scouts return with exact enemy numbers

    When posting back results, mods do not post the actual roll they performed just the random range of numbers based on the accuracy of said roll outcome. When deciding the range, mods simply take the actual troop numbers x inaccuracy (opposite of accuracy) which will give them their interval, which they can apply into a range any way they like (as long as the actual army numbers fall within the range).

    For example: The interval of 20% accuracy on 1000 troops is worked by 1000x0.8=800, thus the range is 800 wide. Now the mod can post back any range of 800 hundred that they like as long as 1000 is within that range. For example 800-1600 range, or 950-1750 or even 1000-1800.

    Campaigning II (Land Units and Land Battles)

    Soldiers
    Troop Types

    Footmen (Light Infantry)

    - Soldiers wearing little by way of armour, wearing at most leather, and equipped with light shields and usually a spear. Most light infantry are conscripted peasants fulfilling their levy obligations, though some professional soldiers elect to equip themselves lightly for a variety of purposes.
    - Light Infantry get +2 to rolls when attacking enemy walls during a siege.

    Archers
    - Lightly armoured men equipped with ranged weaponry, these men form the ranged component of Westerosi armies, using their weapons to lob deadly projectiles at distant foes.

    Men-at-Arms (Heavy Infantry)
    - Men wearing anything from chainmail to partial plate, these are the professional fighting foot of any army. Made up of freedmen with the means to provide for the more expensive weapons and armour these men wear, these infantrymen are well armed, well armoured and proficient in warfare.
    - Heavy Infantry get -2 to rolls when attacking enemy walls during a siege.
    - Heavy Infantry get +2 rolls when facing Light Cavalry, even if committed. This applies during a mixed charge if Light Cavalry make up more than 50% of the charging cavalry.

    Light Cavalry
    - Mounted men below the rank of knight, these troops are lightly armed and fast, often wearing little more than leather or chain, armed with lances and perhaps a sword or mace. Skilled as scouts, foragers, or cheap mounted manpower.
    - Light Cavalry may be deployed (in whole or in part) as a screen to armies, providing two bonuses:
    ----- 1. Any scout rolls done on the province the army is in are subject to a -1 modifier for every 500 Light Cavalry in the screen.
    ----- 2. Any enemy army entering the province has a 4/20 chance per 500 Light Cavalry in the screened army to be detected and lose the chance of a surprise attack.
    ----- Number of Light cavalry on screening duty must be clearly stated in the army's current thread (eg in the Siege of the Twins thread if your army is besieging the Twins)
    ----- Light Cavalry on screening duty will not be present during any battle that happens in that province.

    Knights (Heavy Cavalry)
    - The tanks of the battlefield, heavy cavalry are often found wearing plate armour, on both themselves and their mounts, wielding heavy lances and a variety of sidearms. Comprised of the throngs of knightly families and minor noblemen, a heavy cavalryman is both wealthy and cultured, usually belonging to the lower nobility.

    Movement Bonuses

    - Armies comprised of any mix of Light Infantry, Archers and Light/Heavy Cavalry can move at 125% speed on the Hex map.
    - Armies comprised only of Light or Heavy Cavalry move at 150% speed.
    - Armies comprised only of Light Cavalry move at 200% speed.

    - Therefore, the presence of Heavy Infantry and Heavy Cavalry will limit an army to base 100% movement speed.
    Fighting the Battle
    Battles
    When two armies meet they will engage in combat. Each army separates into 3 flanks and if the commander wishes a reserve.

    The battles are rolled Each contesting flank is rolled against the other. Modifiers are added at moderator discretion based on orders and troop composition. The higher roll wins and the lower roll loses.

    When that is determined a casualty roll is done.
    Winning side 1d4%
    Losing side 1d4+4%

    Moral
    After a certain number of casualties men will begin losing the will to fight this will result in a moral roll. These begin when 10% of a flank is dead.
    Beginning at 10% casualties armies will begin getting a moral roll they need to pass. The save for this roll is equal to half of your casualties so at 10% casualties you will have a 5/20 chance of routing. This is modified by the commanders charisma.

    Vanguard/Rear
    A general may chose to deploy in the vanguard of a battle. If they do they get a post battle death roll after each round of combat. However the men will be inspired by you personally choosing to lead them and you will get +3 to your flanks moral checks. This comes with a risk however if the leader of a flank falls in combat the flank will be demoralized and get -2 to the moral checks and begin getting moral checks even if not at the 10% threshold.

    A commander may also chose rear deployment. A rear deployed commander will not get a post battle roll unless their flank breaks however the sight of the commander sitting safely behind the lines gives the men a -1 to moral checks.

    Dragons
    Dragons are devastating weapons of war that strike fear in the hearts of those they fight against and bringing heart to those on their side.
    If you are deploying a dragon rider without an opposing rider on the same flank the moral rolls begin at once.
    Class 1
    +2/-2

    Class 2
    +4/-4

    Class 3
    +6/-6

    Class 4
    +8/-8

    Rallying
    When a flank begins to break the reserve can be committed in an attempt to rally the flank.
    A rally roll is done using the same calculation for a rout roll +1 for every 200 reinforcing troops.

    Routing
    When a flank breaks a d10 initial rout roll is done to determine the initial casualties.

    When all three flanks break a d20 route roll is done to determine the casualties of the entire rout. This is halved to a d10 if there is an uncommitted reserve.

    Concluding a Battle

    At the end of the battle, when the last Battle Phase is concluded, a winner will be declared if both armies are still on the field fighting. It may be declared an inconclusive draw if both armies control significant parts of the battlefield and are not being threatened with a rout or with becoming surrounded and cut off from retreat. In this case, the end of the battle comes with nightfall and both forces break off and retreat to their camps, and may either electively withdraw in good order or resume with a new battle the following day. Night raids may be considered, depending on whether there are any troops fresh enough to mount one.

    If the battle reaches a point where one army is clearly overwhelmed or broken apart, the Moderator will halt the battle and declare one army the winner. The losing army will then retreat, either in a rout (causing casualties) or in good order, depending on whether the victor is able and willing to pursue. As such a hard-fought battle may not result in the defeated force being routed, as the victorious enemy may have fully committed to the battle itself and his Cavalry may be exhausted and disorganized.

    Whether a rout occurs will depend on the victor's Cavalry: Men-at-Arms with the -5 malus for exhaustion will not chase down routing troops. Hobelars and Mounted Archers bogged down in any type of non-Open Terrain will not chase down routing troops. d20*[Pursuing Cavalry] casualties will be inflicted in a rout, capped at 50% of the routing troops.
    Surprise Attacks
    If an army is laying siege they are vulnerable to surprise attacks by enemy forces in the local area. Base chance of successfully surprising a siege is 16/20. Patrols of mounted or dismounted soldiers may be put on screening duty by the besiegers, resulting in a -2 chance of surprise per 50 men. Thus, 400 men on screening will render surprise attacks impossible.

    If an army is taken by surprise during their siege, the attackers gain +4 to all rolls during the battle.
    Post-Battle Condition Rolls
    Post battle condition rolls are not modified by survival and are done with a d-100
    1-2 death
    3- permanent wound no survival modifier on the disability table
    4-6 permeant wound using survival modifier on the disability table
    7-12 Major wound (Mods choice: comma or bedridden for 3 IRL days)
    13-20 Serious Wound (Mods Choice: -3 to Duel, Survival, or Battle traits for 2 RL days)
    21-30 Minor Wound (Mod pick -1 to duel or survival for 2 irl days)
    31-40 Captured if on the winning side a d20 is rolled a 6+ is free
    41-100 Free and unharmed

    Disability table, not modified by +Survival. Trait points made redundant by rolls here are not refunded.

    1-5 Disfigured. -10 Charisma. Character's face is badly maimed (on a level similar to Sandor Clegane's), making them unsightly.
    6-10 Crippled (Arm). Cannot Duel, -10 Survival if participating in a Battle. One of the character's arms is rendered useless, rendering them unable to effectively defend themselves.
    11-15 Crippled (Leg). Cannot Duel, can still Joust. Cannot command Infantry, only Cavalry.
    16-20 Old War Wound. Begin death rolls every year henceforth. Starting at 2/20, with +2 every 5 years. If the character is already of age for death rolls, +2 henceforth.

    In the event that the overall leader in command, or one of the section commanders is killed, a negative modifier may be added to the army/army section who losses a commander. The size of the modifier will be determined by moderator discretion. A more central, militarily accomplished character will be more of a loss and blow to morale than an incompetent commander. /contentbox]

    Campaigning III (Surprise Attacks, Occupied Enemy Territory and Levy Replenishment Rules)
    Surprise Attacks

    If an army is laying siege they are vulnerable to surprise attacks by enemy forces in the local area. Base chance of successfully surprising a Siege is 16/20. Light Cavalry may be put on Screening Duty by the besiegers, resulting in a -4 chance of surprise per 500 Light Cavalry. Thus, 2,000 Light Cavalry on screening will render surprise attacks impossible.

    If an army is taken by surprise during their siege, the attackers gain +4 to all rolls during the battle.

    Occupied Enemy Territory

    - Occupied provinces can be taxed when the castle is taken. If the defenders have a Holdfast building, the province can be taxed as long as the 'outer castle' is taken.

    - 10% of the province's base tax may be taxed per 500 men occupying the province. Remember garrison limits of castles: any soldiers occupying the territory above that limit are regarded as outside the castle. This means 5,000 men must be devoted to fully tax an occupied territory. Taxes go into the coffers of whichever character is in command of the occupying forces. Auxes will pay their 'main' boss, as they can't have incomes.

    Levy Replenishment

    Men of the levy that are killed replenish at a rate of 25% per year.

    Campaigning IV (Naval Units and Naval Battles)

    Conducting a Naval Battle
    Posting your Fleets

    1. Navies will be divided into at least three squadrons, the mandatory three being Left, Center and Right. These three mandatory squadrons conduct the main battle, with Player 1's Left fighting Player 2's right, and vice versa, and each Player's Center fighting the opposite Center.

    2. An unlimited number of optional squadrons can be created to do any additional task you please. Bear in mind this is the Age of Sail, ships are not very manoeuvrable and cannot easily do things like flanking, disengaging, feinting, etc. Complex orders will be subject to any success rolls or negative modifiers that the rolling Moderator decides are appropriate.

    3. Players will post each squadron clearly, along with clear and unambiguous orders. Any interpretation the rolling Moderator is forced to do will be their interpretation alone. Each squadron posted will list the following:
    - Commander(s)
    - Ships(s), this includes posting the ship type, number, points value and any troops they are transporting
    - Order(s)

    Rolling the Battle

    The moderator will roll for each side with the following formula:

    d20 * [Total Points] = Score. The winning side is the side with the higher score.

    Then, working out ships lost,

    Winner Ships Lost %: [Lower Score] / [Higher Score]
    Loser Ships Lost %: [Higher Score] / [Lower Score]

    Total ships lost is capped at 50% of the [Lesser Force] for both sides.

    The winner can then capture enemy ships by the following process:

    d[Number of Loser Ships Lost]*0.25 (eg, if the losing side lost 100 ships, roll d100*0.25)

    This enables up to 25% of the enemy ships 'killed' to be captured. Split up up evenly among types (eg if the enemy fleet had 100 ships, 80 of Levy Ship and 20 of Dromond, and 10 enemy ships were captured, 8 would be Levy Ships and 2 would be Dromonds. If 20 were captured, 16 Levy and 4 Dromonds. Fair split by ratio.)

    Aftermath

    - Player characters undergo standard wounded/captured rolls.
    - The enemy fleet retreats to the nearest friendly port, or to any other port specified by the losing player provided it is not closer than the nearest friendly port to which the ships would otherwise flee to. The port the ships flee to must, however, be friendly: you cannot 'retreat' to an enemy or neutral port.

    Ship Types

    Standard Ships:

    • Levy Ship: 15 point
      • Can sail in rivers

    • Dromond: 30 points
      • Can sail in rivers

    • Heavy Galley: 50 points
    • Grand Warship: 100 points


    Campaigning V (Sieges and +Siege Defence modifiers for castles)

    Rolling a Siege/Demanding Surrender/Ruination


    Rolling a Siege

    Rolling a siege is the same as rolling a Land Battle except the flanks are Gatehouse and Walls, not Left, Right, and Centre. Much like a land battle, the victorious army must remain stationary for 6 RL hours after taking the defences.

    Remember also that Heavy Infantry gets a -2 to rolls if attacking the Walls, as getting up a ladder in such heavy equipment is very tiring.

    Remember also that sieges require Light Cavalry screens protecting the besieging army in order to ensure the besieging army is not taken by surprise by a relief force.

    Demanding Surrender


    Castles are unlikely to surrender, as the defenders feel they can wait out a besieging force and inflict heavy casualties on them in any assault.

    A castle will begin with a 0/20 chance of surrender, with the following modifiers:

    Positive
    +1 for being outnumbered (points) by 2:1.
    +3 for being outnumbered (points) by 4:1.
    +5 for being outnumbered (points) by 8:1 or more.
    +5 if the besiegers have a family member of the defending House as a hostage.
    +5 if the besiegers are sure help will never be arriving (eg they already know their Lord's armies are defeated and scattered).

    Negative
    -2 if the garrison believes help may be coming (they got a raven out, for example).
    -2 if the holdfast is medium.
    -5 if the holdfast is large.

    Ruination

    If a conquering player wishes to completely destroy a castle, the sacked fortress or city will lose all of its defensive values to represent extensive destruction. The castle will require rebuilding at a cost of half the province income value plus half the value of any constructed buildings. It will be classed as a Ruined Holdfast until the reconstruction is complete. To do this, the player must spend longrt stationary rather than the normal 6: an extra 3 hours is needed for minor castles, 6 for castles, and 9 for major holdfasts. Harrenhall cannot be Ruined, it is simply too vast to tear apart.

    Cities
    Cities are wealthy town centers that house massive populations, but their sheer size make them hard to defend. All cities have keeps in the center that allow the defenders to fall back if the wider city falls these are classified as small castles. Do to the large population needed to be fed cities will only last 3 days in a siege. You can extend that by not feeding the general populace, but it risks civil unrest in the city.
    Kings Landing, Gulltown, Oldtown, Lannisport, and White Harbor all follow city rules.
    Cities can hold 20,000 men in them.
    Cities require at least 10,000 soldiers to adequately defend. With the full 10,000 they get a +10 defensive modifier.
    At 5,000 men they get a +5 defensive bonus
    Any less than 5,000 gives no defensive bonus.
    Any less than 2,000 men get a -5 malus to defense rolls

    Castles
    Castles- are hardy fortifications designed to allow a small number of the defenders to fight a much larger number of attackers. There are three types of keeps. Large, Medium, and Small. All castles will last 1 week in a siege.
    Large Keeps
    Large Keeps give a +20 to defense rolls and can house 5,000 men
    The Crownlands
    Dragonstone
    The Reach
    Highgarden
    Horn Hill
    The Riverlands
    The Twins
    Riverrun
    The Westerlands
    Casterly Rock
    Castamere
    The Stormlands
    Storm’s End
    Blackhaven
    The North
    Winterfell
    Dreadfort
    The Vale
    Runestone

    Medium Keeps
    Medium Keeps give a +15 to defense rolls and can house 3,000 men
    The Crownlands
    Rosby
    Duskendale
    Bywater
    Rayonet
    Stonedance
    The Reach
    Brightwater Keep
    Old Oak
    Redwater Keep
    Goldengrove
    Starpike
    Grassy Vale
    Tumbleton
    The Arbor
    The Riverlands
    Butterwell
    Seagard
    Stone Hedge
    Wayfarer’s Rest
    Blackwood Vale
    Maidenpool
    Pinkmaiden
    The Westerlands
    The Crag
    Ashemark
    Goldentooth
    Feastfires
    Sarsfeild
    Hornvale
    Crakehall
    Silverhall
    Payne Hall
    Cornfeild
    The Stormlands
    Nightsong
    Summerfeild
    Stonehelm
    Estermont
    Rainhouse
    Tarth
    Parchments
    Bronzegate
    The North
    Karhold
    Barrowtown
    The Rills
    Flint’s Finger
    Deepwood
    Last Hearth
    The Vale
    Red Fort
    Eastweald
    Ironoaks
    Strongsong
    Northweald
    Gates of the Moon

    Small Keeps
    Small Keeps give a +10 to defensive rolls and can house 1,000 men
    All Keeps not listed are considered small

    Special Fortifications
    Special Fortifications- These fortifications are different and do not follow the normal rules for castles or cities.
    The Eyrie- The Eyrie is a castle on top of a massive mountain protected by 3 smaller keeps. Each keep needs to be taken before the Eyrie can be taken. Each smaller keep is classified as a small castle. The Eyrie itself is given a +30 to defense bonuses. However, it’s position on top of the mountain means it can only house 2,000 men comfortably. The Eyrie’s high altitude also makes it uninhabitable in winter.
    The Bloody Gate- The bloody Cate is designed to protect the Vale from invaders this means there is no limit to the number of troops that can stand behind the wall and hold position. It gets a +25 defensive bonus when attacked from the West. However, it’s design means there are no defenses to the East and as such gets no bonus when attacked from the East.
    Moat Caitlyn- Three Ruined Towers stand out amidst a marshy bog with only a narrow road cut through it. As such there is no limit to the number of men that can garrison the area, and it gets a +25 bonus when attacked from the south. However, gets no bonus if attacked from the north.
    Harrenhal- Harrenhal is extraordinarily massive. As such it can hold 10,000 men, but it’s size makes it hard to garrison effectively.
    It gets a +20 bonus if it has 7,500 men
    It gets a +10 bonus if it houses 4,000 men
    It gets a mere +5 bonus if garrisoned by 2,000 men
    It gets a no bonus if garrisoned by less than 2,000 men


    Siege Equipment

    Tier 1 - Rams & Light Ladders
    - 6 hours to construct.
    - Basic siege equipment required for assault on a castle.

    Tier 2 - Siege Ladders
    - 12 hours to construct.
    - Grants +3 to siege attack rolls.

    Tier 3 - Siege Towers
    - 24 hours/1 day to construct.
    - Grants +5 to siege attack rolls. Does not stack with Siege Ladders.
    - Required for Major Fortress Sieges


    Raiding

    Detection Roll:
    (Modified down by the highest Pathfinder trait of any character on the raid and modified up by the province value, +1 to detection for each 10,000 Dragons)
    1-5, the peasants are caught completely by surprise and no defence can be mustered. Proceed straight to a Loot Roll.
    6-10, the peasants muster a weak defence, but in the chaos do not send riders to report the attacking banners. Proceed to Raid Roll.
    11-15, the peasants muster a defence, and report the identity of the attackers by rider to the local keep. Proceed to Perception Roll.
    16-20, the attackers are detected well before they arrive, allowing the local Levy and Militia to rally to the defence. Conduct a Perception Roll and a Field Battle.

    Perception Roll: Roll a d20, with 1-10 being a vague understanding of who you are (eg, 'Westermen') and 11-20 being a more specific understanding (eg, 'Westermen from Sarsfield'). Use of banners will not alter this roll, though banners will be reported alongside any other findings (eg 'They had Winterfell banners but seemed like Rivermen to me'). RP justifications shall be the survivors recognizing an accent or dialect, overhearing raiders mentioning something that gives a clue to their origin, etc. Proceed to Raid roll afterwards.

    Raid Roll: Roll a d20, with the outcome being the % of your force lost during the pillaging spree to death, desertion or disappearance. This is capped at 400 men, since large forces are otherwise at a disadvantage, where every 1% represents ever larger numbers of men for no extra gain.

    Loot Roll: Roll a d10, with the outcome in % being the loot you gained, based on the following table:

    Very poor - 20,000
    Poor - 30,000
    Prosperous - 40,000
    Very prosperous - 50,000
    Rich - 60,000
    Very rich - 70,000

    In addition, gain +1% for every 250 men present in the raiding party (after the Raid Roll casualties are factored in, and rounded to the nearest 500) up to a maximum of +12% (3,000 men) and +1% for each point of Pillager for any character in the raiding party (max 1 character applied per player, to stop single players exploiting this by sending parties with 4 characters each with +3 Pillager).

    Thus a maximum amount of 22% base loot may be seized. Once an army has raided a province, it will be stationary for 3 RL hours.

    Raid Size Limitations:

    The size of a raiding army will have effect on how easily it will be detected. The more men that are present in a raiding force, the easier it becomes for the local populace to detect that force and prepare against it. Historically, it was much easier for a small group of men to remain undetected compared to a larger group of men and this rule is meant to simulate this kind of effect.

    -- The maximum size that a raiding force can be without having any penalties is 2,000 men
    -- For every 250 men above this cap, a +5 will be added to the raid detection roll.
    -- An army that is over 3,000 men (+20 detection rolls) will always be detected by the local populace when it is on a raiding mission and it will usually be subject to a full-scale battle with the local provincial levy as a result
    -- The maximum size for a raiding fleet is 40 ships before detection penalties are involved.
    -- For every 20 ships above this size, there will be a +4 to detection rolls. A fleet larger than 120 ships will automatically be forced to fight the local regional levy.

    In addition, a raiding army connected to a Lordly House is limited a maximum of three raids per year. This is to prevent player abuse in raiding a whole bunch of close together and undefended provinces while also helping the moderators by not having us roll five to ten raids per week per person. This shall be rped as your men being satisfied by their acquired loot and wanting to return home to spend it.

    Rebellions
    There may come a time when a player decides that he can no longer sit idly by under the rule of his Lord Paramount, and begins plotting rebellion.

    Should a player decide to rebel, all AI High Lords, if called upon, will undertake a decision as to whether they will side with the rebels, their liege lord, or remain neutral. AI High Lords not requested by either party will remain neutral until called upon to decide.

    Reasons for rebellion will be strictly vetted, and if it is suspected that players are creating Houses solely for the purpose of finding a reason to rebel, they may be barred from rolling the House entirely. A rebellion is a serious matter and, in a Feudal culture, unthinkable at first glance.

    Reasons for Rebellion

    Rebellions will be permitted only where players can justify it on IC grounds, including:

    - Betrayal in some form from their master (eg reneging on a promise, seizing family, murder of family, seizure of land/privileges/rights)
    - Heavy taxation (typically over 20% would be regarded as heavy, though room for context and IC situation will be made for this determination)
    - Compelling offers from powerful third parties (eg being offered the Lord Paramountcy in your master's place, being offered restoration of lands, titles, etc)
    - Lord Paramount switches religion
    - Lord Paramount betrays his own liege (the King/Queen), but the player prefers loyalty to the Crown over the Lord Paramount

    Things that will not usually be considered 'justified' are reasons that are motivated solely by Out of Character reasoning. Not liking another player is not grounds for your character to rebel against theirs. Moderators will take action should this, or another such circumstance, come to pass.

    Rebellions are a serious affair and, due to the AI Reactions rules, are quite likely to result in success . As a result of this, however, strict oversight must be applied to prevent power-hungry players from intentionally creating characters to rebel, or rebelling on poorly justified grounds motivated solely by OOC greed.

    If a rebellion sounds legitimate (eg, a real Lord in a real Westeros would do it), it will generally be allowed to go ahead. Players who are just hunting glory, power, or money will not be permitted to abuse this system.

    Outcome

    Winning a rebellion can result in a variety of different outcomes. Generally, a successful rebel may count on their initial demands being fulfilled. Attempting to gain any more than this, however, may result in support for their cause quickly evaporating. The lords of Westeros are fickle, and are easily upset when the long-standing balance of power in a region is disrupted. Characters who attempt to exploit the weakness of their defeated overlord should be prepared to deal with the consequences

    Duels and Jousts
    Tournament Jousts:
    For jousts, you do two D20 rolls, one for each player.

    1-5 miss
    5-10 glancing blow, body
    11-16 - shield hit, good
    16-19 - shield hit, flawless
    20 - potentially fatal hit

    When one player rolls 20 against the other, another 1D20 is rolled.
    1-5 = death

    Duels and Battlefield Jousts
    A Duel or Joust is decided by whether players are dismounted (Duel) or mounted (Joust), with each type of personal combat modified only by the Duel and Joust traits respectively.

    Simply, each player has 20 health points.
    For every 4 survival points, a player can have 1 extra health point.

    Then Roll "rounds" these in order:
    2 D20
    [(Higher Roll - Lower Roll) / 2] + Weapon/Traits of Winner - Armor/Traits of Loser = Damage to Loser ;
    1 D20, 50% chance of damage to Winner also;
    If Damage is done:
    1 D10, 10 is 100% same as Damage to loser, while 1 is 10%.
    Take this number and apply halved Weapon/Armor/Trait numbers to it.
    (We round up if you get a decimal)
    Then you let the players RP it and decide whether to continue or not.

    Worst-case scenario, the losing player loses 10 health in one round.

    You keep doing these "rounds" until one player dies, submits, or otherwise "loses".

    In a normal tourney, unless otherwise stated, characters are given equal armor and weapons, and as such, the weapon/armor points are non-existent.
    Last edited by Lucius Malfoy; January 29, 2019 at 12:26 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Game of Thrones Rules Thread

    Section VI. Dragon Rules
    The Rules below are based upon certain scenarios and not all

    Dragons: Acquring, Hatching and Training
    WIP. I do believe Gandy had reformed dragon-taming rules in the works already. May be a good idea to make it even harder to tame dragons in general, as well.

    Dragon Classes, Duels, and Mechanics
    Dragon classes: Dragons are placed in these categories based not necessarily on their age, but their fighting skills and experience. All newly-hatched dragons are helpless hatchlings until they reach the age of 6, at which point they have grown large enough for a child to ride and are automatically placed in Class I. Class I dragons, representing juveniles capable of defending themselves and flying their rider over short to moderate distance but little else, will automatically transition to Class II upon reaching age 10, when they are old enough to be truly combat-effective, and reach adulthood at the age of 20 (Class IV). From Class IV onward, the only way to advance a dragon's skill will be to use it in combat.

    * If a dragon kills another dragon of the same class in battle, it has a 50-50 chance of getting promoted to the next class, determined by a simple coin flip (heads = promotion, tails = nothing). If a dragon kills two dragons of the same class, then it will acquire an automatic promotion to the next class.

    * If a dragon kills another dragon belonging to the class above its own, it gets an automatic promotion.

    * If a dragon kills another dragon belonging to a lower class, it has a 25% chance of getting promoted to the next class, determined by a 1d4 (4 = promotion, 1-3 = nothing). If it kills two lower-class dragons, it has a 50-50 chance of promotion, determined by a coin flip. If it kills three such dragons, it will gain an automatic promotion.

    Class 0 - Hatchling:
    Age 0-6
    Health: 10
    Damage range: 1-10
    Note: Hatchlings cannot be used in battle.

    Class I - Juvenile:
    Age 6-9
    Health: 20
    Damage range: 1-10
    Note: While juveniles can be used in battle, they contribute nothing in terms of morale penalties.

    Class II - Adolescent:
    Age 10-14
    Health: 40
    Damage range: 10-20

    Class III - Combat-Capable Adolescent:
    Age 15-19
    Health: 85
    Damage range: 10-30

    Class IV - Mature Adult:
    Age 20 upward
    Health: 120
    Damage range: 15-40

    Class V - Veteran Adult:
    Only gained through combat experience (see below)
    Health: 200
    Damage range: 20-60

    Class VI - Beast of Legend:
    Only gained through combat experience (see below)
    Health: 525
    Damage range: 30-75

    Dragons in Battles:
    - If there is no dragon present on the opposing side of a battle, a dragon can deployed to fight in a land battle, inflicting a variable morale penalty dependent on the class of the dragon upon the opposing flank.
    - However, if there is an opposing dragon present, then the two dragonriders must engage in a duel to either kill or drive off the opposing dragon: the only exception is if both dragonrider players have submitted orders that they are not to engage another rider, in which case they cancel each other's morale penalties out. The duel takes up the entire battle so the dragon, if it’s still in fighting shape, will not be able to join the battle afterwards.
    - In addition, a dragonrider whose dragon in in a dragon duel will not have their traits be accounted for in the battle. If they were originally meant to command the left flank of a battle, then that left flank no longer receives any battle modifiers from traits.
    - Dragonriders can be assigned to attack specific enemy dragons and their riders.

    Dragon Duels:
    - Dragon duels shall be rolled like normal melee duels, but with the HP of the two dragons being dependent upon both the class of the dragon.
    - Dragon damage ranges are affected by their class. For example, if Vhagar (a Class VI) is engaged in a duel and rolls higher than its opponent in a round, the presiding mod will roll a d80 and apply any result between 30 and 75 as the damage done to the other dragon. This should keep duels from dragging on forever, considering the high HP counts of the upper draconic classes.
    - Dragonriders can flee a duel at any point if they are losing, but may be pursued by their opponent with a 8/20 chance to catch them. To simulate the greater agility of younger dragons such as Tessarion and Moondancer compared to older, larger dragons, if the fleeing dragon is at least 20 years younger than its opponent, it receives a +2 to its escape chance; if it is at least 20 years older, it receives a -2 instead.
    - A dragonrider engaging an opposing character who is on foot or horse in a duel would include their dragon's hp and get 2 attack rolls, one for the rider and the other for the dragon.
    - A defeated dragonrider has a basic 5/20 chance to survive his or her defeat. -1 will be applied to that modifier for every difference in class between the defeated and victorious dragon. (for example, if a Class IV dragon defeats a Class II, the loser has only a 3/20 chance of surviving)

    Post Battle Dragon Rolls:
    Dragons will, just as player characters in any battle, require a wound/death roll based on a D*20
    1-3 Killed in action
    4-7 wounded
    8-20 free

    • If a dragon is wounded, a secondary roll shall be done to determine how severe the wound is (1- 5 severe, 6-12 mild, 13-20 light). Severely injured dragons cannot fly and lose all movement speed increases

    An injured dragon will take 1 week for light, 2 weeks for mild, 3 weeks for severe to recover, and if in combat before the week(s) is up, the dragon suffers a -2/-4/-6 to all rolls and +1/2/3 to wound/death rolls respectively for light/mild/severe wounds. After each week passes, a dragon will move down a step in the injury level, severe to mild, mild to light, light to uninjured.

    Injured dragons will require a death roll for every new year as long as it is still injured and must undergo at least one death roll.
    - This roll is to represent the chance of death due to infection or other difficult to treat ailments as a result of the dragon's wounds. The chances of death will be 1/20, 3/20 and 5/20 respectively for light/mild/severe injuries.

    Dragons can also escape a battle before it begins and they are given a 12/20 base chance at a large dragon and this increases by +2 per lower dragon size.

    If a dragon engages another in a duel, then like we would for human characters, their post-battle death roll is waived for that battle.

    Countering Dragons:
    Dragons can be countered by having men on the battlefield who are equipped with weapons that can take a dragon down. These weapons include longbows, crossbows, and ballistae. The following bonuses shall be applied to the dragon death rolls by meeting the following requirements:

    • For every 1,000 archers present on the battlefield, Class I and II dragons get a +1 to their chance of death. Class III get a +1 death chance for every 3,000 archers. Class IV and upward need not worry about death by arrow, though their rider will still have to fear battle death rolls.
    • A ballista capable of firing bolts large enough to fell dragons can be constructed for 35,000 dragons per ballista.
    • Ballistae, if deployed, will force enemy dragons that have not engaged in a duel to face a base 1/20 chance of death in addition to their usual battle death roll. The chance increases by +1 for every ballista deployed.

    Dragons During Sieges:
    A dragon can be deployed during a siege to reduce the castles defenses. A D*20 will be rolled to determine the extent of the damage based on the following criteria:

    • 1 – 5: reduces siege bonus by 1
    • 6 – 10: reduces siege bonus by 2
    • 11 -15: reduces siege bonus by 3
    • 16 – 20: reduces siege bonus by 4

    However, there comes a cost to sending a dragon to attack a castle as it exposes the dragons to the castle’s defenders who are in a greater position to take a dragon down. Dragon death chance is increased by +2 to effectively be: (1-5 Killed in action, 6-10 wounded, 11-20, free/uninjured.)

    Known Dragons (Dance start)
    Class 0:
    Morghul - Jaehaera Targaryen - age 5
    Shrykos - Jaehaerys Targaryen - age 5
    Stormcloud - Aegon Targaryen - age 3

    Class I:
    Moondancer - Baela Targaryen - age 9

    Class II:
    Arrax - Lucerys Velaryon - age 14
    Tyraxes - Joffrey Velaryon - age 12

    Class III:
    Tessarion - Daeron Targaryen - age 15
    Vermax - Jacaerys Velaryon - age 15

    Class IV:
    Dreamfyre - Helaena Targaryen - age 110
    Syrax - Rhaenyra Targaryen - age 32

    Class V:
    Caraxes - Daemon Targaryen - age 47
    Meleys - Rhaenys Targaryen - age 80
    Sunfyre - Aegon II Targaryen - age 21

    Class VI:
    Vhagar - Aemond Targaryen - age 180

    Wild dragons:
    Cannibal - Class VI - age 300
    Grey Ghost - Class IV - age 50
    Seasmoke - Class IV - age 30
    Sheepstealer - Class IV - age 80
    Silverwing - Class IV - age 95
    Vermithor - Class V - age 95

    Name = Dragon is deceased
    Last edited by Barry Goldwater; February 27, 2019 at 09:10 AM.
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