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Thread: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

  1. #21

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by zoner16 View Post



    Some interesting things to note is that only one warlord has a base on the southern side of the Yangtze (Sun Jian), despite the collectors edition map showing that the south has a settlement density equal to the north. So there's going to be an entire half of the map without playable factions in it.
    €‹€‹For Now€‹€‹

    Get ready to open your wallets boys, Southern Warlords/hopefully also a dlc featuring the Shanyue and Nanyue(and definitely the Nanman at some point after release) here we come.

    I just hope they also extend the edges of the map a bit in some areas(and by a lot in others) but that's a topic for another day.

  2. #22
    JackDionne's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Of all the threads I have read on this forum over the years. This one is one of the best, great job to all the members!
    Can you say Three Kingdoms? I knew you could! So looking forward to it.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDionne View Post
    Of all the threads I have read on this forum over the years. This one is one of the best, great job to all the members!
    Thanks! Let me know if there's anything specific you want coverage of. I'll try to put something together.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion



    CA sponsored Kings and Generals to make a video (or maybe multiple, don't know yet) covering battles within the time period. This one is on the Guandu campaign.
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  5. #25
    Seether's Avatar RoTK Workhorse
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Yeu Jin?
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  6. #26

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Seether View Post
    Yeu Jin?
    They fixed it in the actual video. Me and some of the other Patreons caught it during the internal preview a few days ago. I guess they didn't change the preview image

    You should have seen their video on the battle of Mobei. They misspelled "Cao Wei" as "Cai Weu" and nobody caught it since it came right at the end.
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  7. #27

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by zoner16 View Post


    CA sponsored Kings and Generals to make a video (or maybe multiple, don't know yet) covering battles within the time period. This one is on the Guandu campaign.
    It talks of Cao Cao using trebuchet siege weapons. Many claimed that it was not used in this period...
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  8. #28

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by PointOfViewGun View Post
    It talks of Cao Cao using trebuchet siege weapons. Many claimed that it was not used in this period...
    Traction Trebuchets, not Counterweight Trebuchets.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    They should look something alone these lines (taken from Oriental Empires):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    As mentioned in the video, they were decent enough to take down wood structures. They could probably take down rammed earth with enough patience and rocks. What they should not be able to do is knock down a stone faced wall in a matter of minutes.
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  10. #30
    Seether's Avatar RoTK Workhorse
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by PointOfViewGun View Post
    It talks of Cao Cao using trebuchet siege weapons. Many claimed that it was not used in this period...
    Nobody has claimed trebuchets were not used in this period. Many (including myself) have said the trebuchets that were used in this period were not powerful enough to destroy stone walls or heavy fortifications. Big difference. And the artillery (catapults or trebuchets) used by Cao Cao at Guandu were used to destroy Yuan Shao’s siege towers (as Cao Cao was the one being besieged), which were fairly fragile wooden structures, not take down stone walls or other fortifications.

    Quote Originally Posted by AHumpierRogue View Post
    Traction Trebuchets, not Counterweight Trebuchets.
    This.
    Last edited by Seether; February 14, 2019 at 11:40 AM.
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  11. #31
    JackDionne's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by zoner16 View Post
    Thanks! Let me know if there's anything specific you want coverage of. I'll try to put something together.
    Were chariots still used in this time period?
    Which faction or leader preferred to have professional army rather then conscripts? Where the armies as well organized and trained as the Roman armies of the day? What currency did they use back then? How much were the soldiers paid if at all?
    Can you say Three Kingdoms? I knew you could! So looking forward to it.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDionne View Post
    Were chariots still used in this time period?
    Not in actual combat. They did serve as command platforms and transportation for people of importance, but their battlefield role had been superseded by cavalry.

    Which faction or leader preferred to have professional army rather then conscripts?
    All of them probably would have liked to have one. It's just that maintaining a professional army is very hard and expensive. Cao Cao was probably the best at it, but this is more a testament to his administrative and organizational skill than any gulf in desire for better military standards between him and the other warlords. You could probably pick out a few who didn't care as much (like most of the bandit leaders), but most warlords tried to maintain at least the facade of professionalism.

    Where the armies as well organized and trained as the Roman armies of the day?
    The Northern Army and the command of the General Who Crosses the Liao may have been. We don't know exactly what their training was, but the professional forces of the Han did have rather strict regulations on gear, a code of military discipline, and a well defined officer hierarchy, which all indicates that they were disciplined. Additionally, the formations attested to in some of the battles in the North and West throughout the reign of the dynasty show capability for complex combat drills and combined arms maneuvers.

    Sadly, most of these units were either dissolved or abandoned with the fall of Dong Zhuo's regime, and there's evidence that their funding and standards had been falling in the twilight days of the empire. Various warlords would try to replicate their previous standards throughout the era, with varying levels of success. In a particularly interesting example, during a reorganization of the Sun family's forces, Lu Meng was allowed to keep his independent command for the sole reason that his men were actually in uniform during inspection.

    What currency did they use back then?
    The standard Chinese coin, the metal circle with a square hole in the middle, was the basic, state-approved currency for exchange. During most of the Han dynasty, this was the "wuzhu (五銖)" cash a specific denomination of the coin theoretically equal in weight to 500 grains (or 5 zhu) of millet. Most standard cash exchanges happened in some quantity of wuzhu.

    Additionally, salaries were calculated in specific amounts of grain per year, with a basic Gentleman (the lowest rank of noble) earning 50 shi (1 shi being about 60kg) of grain, while a full Marquis (the highest normally given rank) earning 1000 shi of grain, ministerial department heads receiving fully 2000 shi of grain, and the three excellencies receiving 10,000 shi of grain. Part of the salary was paid in grain, while the rest was paid in cash.

    Taxes were paid in a combination of cash, grain, and various kinds of silk, depending on circumstance.

    How much were the soldiers paid if at all?
    I'm not sure if I've ever found details on how enlisted men were paid. Presumably those part of the professional army of the Han would have received some payment, with the more disorganized militia and conscript troops merely being fed as their actual service was part of their duty to the state. Among the officer corps there was a rather detailed pay hierarchy, the lowest I can find at the moment is that a major, in command of a battalion, would have received a salary of 1000 shi of grain. There were at least two more junior officer ranks under major (captain and chief), with associated staff positions all over the place, so this probably extended all the way down to the lowest defined salaries.

    During the 3K era, much of these definitions became ad hoc and informal until the states began solidifying and trying to put together more detailed administrative systems to be able to field actually reliable armies again. Gifts and plunder became the standard payment for many soldiers in the early days, which is what created so called "volunteer" armies that were actually mercenaries. Many others were not cajoled by the promise of loot but rather being dragged away by press-gangs under threat of death and pain for them and their families if they deserted.
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  13. #33
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by zoner16 View Post
    Not in actual combat. They did serve as command platforms and transportation for people of importance, but their battlefield role had been superseded by cavalry.
    Which is why we need that Warring States DLC (Or SAGA title)...

  14. #34
    JackDionne's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Apparently they used chariots during the Warring states period. I wonder why they did not use them during 3k? Too expensive to maintain I imagine. Thanks for the answers Zoner!
    Can you say Three Kingdoms? I knew you could! So looking forward to it.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    The two periods are about 600 years apart.
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  16. #36
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDionne View Post
    Apparently they used chariots during the Warring states period. I wonder why they did not use them during 3k? Too expensive to maintain I imagine. Thanks for the answers Zoner!
    Because, as zoner said above, cavalry had supplanted chariots as the primary equine-centric combat role amongst Chinese armies. The reasons are because cavalry were much more mobile, more tactically flexible, and much cheaper to create and maintain. In the novel, I believe the Qiang used chariots when fighting against Zhuge Liang, although I have no idea if this is accurate or not.
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  17. #37

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Seether View Post
    Because, as zoner said above, cavalry had supplanted chariots as the primary equine-centric combat role amongst Chinese armies. The reasons are because cavalry were much more mobile, more tactically flexible, and much cheaper to create and maintain. In the novel, I believe the Qiang used chariots when fighting against Zhuge Liang, although I have no idea if this is accurate or not.
    In the Near East there is a clear connection between the disuse of Chariots and the arrival of the Scyths as mercenaries for the Assyrians etc. The Horse-archer basically made the traditionally chariot obsolete except for being a battlefield-taxi in some cultures.

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  18. #38
    JackDionne's Avatar Senator
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    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Just saw the latest release of the live stream extreme unit size. I noticed the infantry could use a square formation and one round. Is this historical?
    Can you say Three Kingdoms? I knew you could! So looking forward to it.

  19. #39

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    It makes sense. Why use a chariot drawn by four or six horses when you can have six guys riding those horses and shooting arrows at people. Seems like a waste of horses to me.


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  20. #40

    Default Re: Three Kingdoms Historical Information and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDionne View Post
    Just saw the latest release of the live stream extreme unit size. I noticed the infantry could use a square formation and one round. Is this historical?
    Sorta. "Square" (not hollow square) and "Circle" formations were among the basic formations that were used by Chinese armies, but the historical ones were meant for multiple units to form more loosely, rather than single units to form tightly. However, trying to do this with the way Total War represents units means that half your army would be required to pull off just one of these formations, which would make it be too unwieldy to use.

    So the idea is sound, but the execution is compromised due to the way the game works, which is par for the course in this series.
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