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Thread: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

  1. #21
    Roma_Victrix's Avatar Gatorade, is it in you?
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    Default Re: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

    Very good arguments, you guys. I think we can put this one to rest, but I'll just hijack my own thread with a new question then: what if Caesar conquered the British Isles with a permanent garrison instead of a temporary invasion force? Later British would hail him as the first Brit, a true son of Britain with a Manchester United t-shirt stained from the fish and chips he ate drunkenly at 4:00 in the morning. Because Britain can turn even the biggest teetotaler into a despondent, raging alcoholic.

  2. #22
    Lord Oda Nobunaga's Avatar 大信皇帝
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    Default Re: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

    I think the Britons would probably just besiege the Romans and kill them. It would be like Black Hawk Down or We Were Soldiers, maybe Caesar shows up at the end bringing reinforcements and shooting the Viet Cong with napalm.

    "Famous general without peer in any age, most superior in valor and inspired by the Way of Heaven; since the provinces are now subject to your will it is certain that you will increasingly mount in victory." - Ōgimachi-tennō

  3. #23
    Carmen Sylva's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

    Caesar would probably make holiday in Magaluf.^^

    He would probably lost Gallia, as his forces were split. The Eburones revolt in winter of 54 BC (loss of one legion in Aduatuca), when the channel can not be crossed, could have led to a defeat of gallic legions, as the britannic garrison couldnt help.
    Last edited by Carmen Sylva; May 31, 2018 at 12:32 PM.
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  4. #24
    Roma_Victrix's Avatar Gatorade, is it in you?
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    Default Re: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Oda Nobunaga View Post
    I think the Britons would probably just besiege the Romans and kill them. It would be like Black Hawk Down or We Were Soldiers, maybe Caesar shows up at the end bringing reinforcements and shooting the Viet Cong with napalm.
    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus_Iunius_Brutus_Caepio View Post
    Caesar would probably make holiday in Magaluf.^^

    He would probably lost Gallia, as his forces were split. The Eburones revolt in winter of 54 BC (loss of one legion in Aduatuca), when the channel can not be crossed, could have led to a defeat of gallic legions, as the britannic garrison couldnt help.
    Lol. Napalm. Either that or Greek fire a few centuries before its invention. Caesar was fire, yo. Especially in the sack. He had ladies lined up outside his hotel room in Magaluf (Cleopatra included), just waiting to get a taste of that long, meaty dictator.

    Just imagine if Caesar was pwned in both Britannia and Gaul at the same time, then! He'd have nowhere to run. He'd probably perish along with his men. This is all assuming Ambiorix would have been as initially successful in the same timeline of events, though. Historically, the Eburones got wiped out as a result of poking the Roman bear.

  5. #25
    Carmen Sylva's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: What if Julius Caesar lived long enough to invade Parthia, as he had planned?

    Well the revolt of Winter 54 seemed to be initiated by Indutiomarus, one of the leader of the Treveri, which lived in the today mountainous german regions of Eifel and Hunsrück:

    Indutiomarus (Gaulish "great truce" or "great messenger") was a leading aristocrat of the Treveri (the people of the area around present-day Trier) at the time of Julius Caesar's conquest of Gaul. He was the head of the anti-Roman party and the political rival of his pro-Roman son-in-law Cingetorix for "supreme power" in the state.[1]

    In 54 BCE, Indutiomarus made preparations for war against the Romans and evacuated non-combatants to the Ardennes. However, when Caesar arrived in the territory of the Treveri en route to Britain, Indutiomarus was deserted by many of his leading supporters and submitted to Caesar in the hopes of preserving his position. Caesar accepted his submission, taking 200 hostages including several of Indutiomarus' close family members, but he also took the opportunity to promote Cingetorix to power among the Treveri at Indutiomarus' expense.[2]

    Deprived of much of his power, Indutiomarus became all the more bitter an enemy of the Romans, and waited for a favourable opportunity to take his revenge. Such an opportunity arrived soon. To ensure adequate food supplies, Caesar had separated his troops into winter quarters dispersed in different parts of Gaul. Indutiomarus encouraged Ambiorix and Cativolcus, chiefs of the Eburones, to attack the Roman legion stationed in their country; he himself soon afterwards marched against Titus Labienus, who was encamped among the Remi, immediately west of the Treveri. Forewarned of Caesar's victory over the Nervii, Indutiomarus withdrew his forces into Treveran country and raised fresh troops. He also spent the winter sending ambassadors to the Germans in search of allies. Other peoples began sending ambassadors to Indutiomarus of their own accord as well – these included the Senones, the Carnutes, the Nervii and the Aduatuci.[3]

    Now emboldened, Indutiomarus declared Cingetorix an enemy of the state and confiscated his property. He marched against Labienus again and surrounded the Roman camp. Indutiomarus took to riding around the camp with his cavalry force almost daily, both to reconnoitre and to intimidate the Romans within. Labienus one day sneaked a large contingent of auxiliary cavalry into the Roman camp, and during one of these exercises the auxiliaries surprised the Treveran force with a sudden sally. Indutiomarus himself was killed in the rout while crossing a river.[4] His death was still a source of anger and rebellion as of 51 BCE, when the Treveri remained in the field on the side of Ambiorix.[5]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indutiomarus

    If Caesar had left 2-3 legions in Britannia, he would probably not have enough time to gather enough legions to relief Cicero or Labienus just in time, as first one was besieged by Ambiorix in his winterquarters, last one by Indutiomarus in his winterquarter. And as Caesar was the all or nothing guy, he could have marched with only a legion and some cohorts to relief Cicero or Labienus. A high risk to get attacked:

    "The Gauls, having discovered the matter through their scouts, abandon the blockade, and march toward Caesar with all their forces; these were about 60,000 armed men."

    https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Commentaries_on_the_Gallic_War/Book_5#49

    Even with the 8000 legionaries Caesar really had, a attack was risky, but with less avaible men it would have been a suicide commando.
    Last edited by Carmen Sylva; June 01, 2018 at 01:11 AM.
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