Page 77 of 78 FirstFirst ... 2752676869707172737475767778 LastLast
Results 1,521 to 1,540 of 1552

Thread: The catchphrase game

  1. #1521

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Quote Originally Posted by makanyane View Post
    I can't figure out anything from that...

    1 - no idea.. butter, curl, knife ?
    2 - has to be butt/but ?
    3 - talk, call, curly ?
    4 - UK, British, patriotism ?

    there's zero combinations of any of those that make any sense
    You are on the right track with everything else except the last picture, Mak. And doing a search on the first three will surely connect the dots. I appreciate the fact that you have played this game nice without search engines, but to move on, using one is not a sin.

  2. #1522

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    I mean, I am trying too, and I also feel like I have good ideas for everything but the last image. All I can think is "Spread your butts, and call the British Inquisition".

    EDIT: Ah! As happens with these things, as I was saying my silly idea out loud, the real one came to me in a flash. "Butter my buns, and call me a biscuit."

    Also, nicely done Sept with using a synonym of a homonym! That is some clever nonsense there!
    Last edited by Kilo11; September 26, 2021 at 07:14 AM.
    | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  3. #1523

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Well that's right, although I imagined buns as butt. Buns make a lot more sense in this context, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kilo11 View Post
    Also, nicely done Sept with using a synonym of a homonym! That is some clever nonsense there!
    I did what now? Do you refer to than buns -> butt -> cigarette butt? It wasn't as clever as I was really thinking of a butt.

  4. #1524

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Well, the expression is with "buns". So I figured you were being really clever, and using a homonym to go from butt (cigarette end) to butt (gluteous maximus), and then a synonym to go from butt to buns. I guess you were only half clever

    Since I got it right, I have the honor of posting the next riddle. To keep the trend, I think I will again use an actual catchphrase. Here it is:







    | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  5. #1525

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    "Hasta la vista, baby" is the answer. I spent a good while thinking about this. I was sure at first that "la" and "view" would be intended to make a "love you". Nothing would work with that assumption, but then it occurred to me that "la" might be from one of the Romance languages and I eventually got it.

    Una vista imponente, sin duda!

  6. #1526

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Dang. I thought that might be harder. I even avoided using any actual baby pictures, and only circled a note, so as not to make "la" so obvious. Well done, Sept!

    The floor is yours, and you'll have to beg a rep off someone else, as I can't give you one yet
    | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  7. #1527

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    I regret the delay, but here is the next one. It is a bit militaristic, but that's me and I cannot really help myself.


  8. #1528

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    What's that rank? Extremely senior sergeant?

  9. #1529

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    That must be master chief petty officer, corresponding to master serageant in the army. One of the most senior NCOs, I'm sure. The markings down the sleeve represent four years of service each, which makes him a particularly long-serving individual.

  10. #1530

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Quote Originally Posted by Septentrionalis View Post
    That must be master chief petty officer, corresponding to master serageant in the army. One of the most senior NCOs, I'm sure. The markings down the sleeve represent four years of service each, which makes him a particularly long-serving individual.
    It was actually a pun about "extremely senior postman" rank that one golem had in Terry Pratchett's book "Going Postal". Which seems to be happening to me when I'm sick so...don't mind my comments.

  11. #1531

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Quote Originally Posted by Sar1n View Post
    It was actually a pun about "extremely senior postman" rank that one golem had in Terry Pratchett's book "Going Postal". Which seems to be happening to me when I'm sick so...don't mind my comments.
    Ah, that's funny. Nothing wrong with your puns; I just have never read a single Pratchett book in despite of a lifetime of RPGs, fantasy novels, and computer games in the genre.

  12. #1532

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Hint time. The following introduction to the round is a hint in itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Septentrionalis View Post
    It is a bit militaristic, but that's me and I cannot really help myself.

  13. #1533

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Another hint. This saying has to do with an animal.

  14. #1534
    Muizer's Avatar member 3519
    Patrician Artifex

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    9,912

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    The tiger cannot change its stripes?
    "Lay these words to heart, Lucilius, that you may scorn the pleasure which comes from the applause of the majority. Many men praise you; but have you any reason for being pleased with yourself, if you are a person whom the many can understand?" - Lucius Annaeus Seneca -

  15. #1535

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Muizer's got it!

  16. #1536
    Muizer's Avatar member 3519
    Patrician Artifex

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    9,912

    Default Re: The catchphrase game



    "Lay these words to heart, Lucilius, that you may scorn the pleasure which comes from the applause of the majority. Many men praise you; but have you any reason for being pleased with yourself, if you are a person whom the many can understand?" - Lucius Annaeus Seneca -

  17. #1537

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    I have given this thought on three occasions but cannot come up with anything that makes sense.

  18. #1538

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Oh, I think I have an idea. It sort of makes some leaps, but it makes some sense too. What about: "A minute on the lips, a lifetime on the hips."
    | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  19. #1539
    Muizer's Avatar member 3519
    Patrician Artifex

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    9,912

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Sorry that's not it.
    "Lay these words to heart, Lucilius, that you may scorn the pleasure which comes from the applause of the majority. Many men praise you; but have you any reason for being pleased with yourself, if you are a person whom the many can understand?" - Lucius Annaeus Seneca -

  20. #1540

    Default Re: The catchphrase game

    Kilo's guess was pretty good, but I cannot come up with anything, even if I allow for that level of abstraction.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •