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Thread: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

  1. #1481
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    As long as you keep up how meatpuppet was playing them
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himster View Post
    The trick is to never be honest. That's what this social phenomenon is engineering: publicly conform, or else.

  2. #1482
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    So who’s the admin?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himster View Post
    The trick is to never be honest. That's what this social phenomenon is engineering: publicly conform, or else.

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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Sorry, Im away for the weekend, so will sort it when Im back

  4. #1484
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    aactually, the sheep guy might take it

  5. #1485

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Who is the sheep guy?
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  6. #1486
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Well, it turns out he cant load the save (as many other people who wanted to join this HS before, not sure whats so weird about this hotseat/mod), so I passed the c save to pal to sub due to his offer, if he doesnt have time, I will sub tomorrow, as Im busy today.

    Sorry for the massive delay.

  7. #1487

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)



    The welsh state ever suffered from lack of finances due to their mountainous terrain and lack of good farming land, providing a fierce but loyal people, but one, hard putout , to build and keep armies of quality to aid in the battlefield. Word was putout to both irish and english states for help with such moneys that ever drained their accounts.



    There was a natural closeness of the irish and welsh people, and a certain amount of animosity with the scottish with their advancement of unification policies which the welsh people didnt like , and it took little time for Rhydderrch of wakes to recruit a small force to helpout on ireland, but the promise of help from the irish was for a promise of land once the battle was over, [their finances obviously spent at the moment] , but this was not to Rhydderch's liking, for although he had raised a force[of which he hoped to attack the isle of mann-but hoped to get monies to build siege engines which he didnt have], so Rhydderch turned to perhaps the only people in the area to plead for monies, and that was england, basically offering his band to england to act as mercenaries in their name, or else he would return home.

    The king[or duke] of wales, took a hard look at the state of the welsh military and the finical hardships , and began a decisive cutting and reallocation of his military forces, hoping that the shortfall , would lead to a slimmer but more elite regiments of welsh troops, which he could offer to the english as a viable military assert, which they could deploy ...[but at a substantial cost of course-winks]

    Turn to Scotland
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/fnkwcohj6f..._T109.sav?dl=0
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz



  8. #1488

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Hi here we go again finally!

    But paladinbob, I don't understand the story line: The Welsh want to help the irish who just invaded by asking money from England and serve them as mercenaries, while Englnd is fighting...Ireland?
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  9. #1489

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by Der Böse Wolf View Post
    Hi here we go again finally!

    But paladinbob, I don't understand the story line: The Welsh want to help the irish who just invaded by asking money from England and serve them as mercenaries, while Englnd is fighting...Ireland?
    there was obviously some type of communication between ireland and the last player of wales..so i am playing into that ....currently the welsh are at war with ireland and scotland , but can neither afford a struggle against neither unless circumstances change Traditionally the welsh were often in conflict with their own , and others, but did become a country capable of providing some great mercenary troops...probably because the lack of opportunities at home to make a profit , but this view is equally particular as their power is subdued by england by such a extent, that they really cant act as a really independant kingdom, but rather lackeys to the english crown, or mercenaries

    equally from meatpuppets last post :-

    Quote Originally Posted by meatpuppet View Post
    ....
    Rhydderch's plan was to reestablish the Welsh kingdom of Strathclyde by taking the Isle of Mann at the opportune moment, and then head to Scotland and the Baron's lands to take the accompanying lands, but recent events, coupled with the fact that in my haste I didn't bring any siege weapons kinda foils the opportunity to do any of this. Ultimately his goal was to assume control of Wales and bring the Baron's into war against the English and then wipe them all out when they were weak, with the Irish or Scots, perhaps. Basically to create a Celtic Britain once again.
    .....
    this force had been landed in ireland, from the looks of it to attack the isle of mann [or help the irish] and with its current location in ireland - to that player character of Rhydderch he could neither move
    forward to siege the isle of mann nor help the irish [i presume due to the communications] without cash on hand...thus he is currently moving to return to wales
    Last edited by paladinbob123; February 25, 2021 at 11:51 AM.
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz



  10. #1490
    meatpuppet's Avatar Foederatus
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Hey guys, I still pop in here albeit less frequently to read where things have gone in case I needed to help with transition... Yeah, the whole Rhydderch thing is difficult to pull off considering one can't actually bribe him AS the Irish with the necessary amount in order to have him temporarily serve the Irish and then work about his schemes... The thing is the bribe would probably cost about 10,000,000,000 gold or some outrageous number simply because that's how the game has always been, but I digress.

    Rhydderch is currently in Ireland because he fled there after communicating with the prince and king of ireland respectively, his goal was retaking wales and ruling independently allied to the irish as the irish king (the last irish player) offered complete autonomy if wales would help them fight england. but the king of wales was pretty much a spineless incompetent who could never lead a successful rebellion imo so i just went with rhydderch formulating his own ambition much like many great men through history

    If someone had console commands you could put funds in wales treasury so rhydderch could act as his own faction, but... idk what your plan is, just telling you where things were

  11. #1491
    meatpuppet's Avatar Foederatus
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Ah yes I came back to say the Welsh being at war with the Scots was clearly an oversight that you guys never corrected cause they've been at war from the moment I had started playing, but it was also convenient for the rebel Welsh to aid ireland so... Alrighty I hope you guys can figure it out, I'll still check here periodically if you need some context but I think that about covers it

  12. #1492

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    At the momentary royal court in Derry...
    ---------------------------------------------

    "He retreated with heavy losses sire. But the Irish did not pursue."
    The messenger gave the report of the rout of the troops of General Kurk in the South.

    "But Prince Nectan took the Lifford Castle".

    The report was finished but Hew was already out heading the royal army to keep advancing.

    Scouts reported heavy Irish troop movement south of Lifford.
    Even if the Scotland now control most of northern Ireland, they are still outnumbered, especially that the troops of the Barons are stuck on the Isle of Man, unable to invade from the east, as was initially planned.




    Note: disregard the open gates; the spies did not have 60% chance. But since there were only two defending units, a battering ram was enough to assault, with the artillery of course. (check next photo, with the Trebuchet)




    ---

    The Irish still control the seas. Their ships are now blockading the southern Scottish ports.
    But in the north, the Scottish still have the upper hand.





    With the end of the English operation in Wales, English troops are now idle close to the Scottish border.
    King Hew, busy in Ireland, sent messengers back to the mainland.

    ----

    Barons next: http://www.mediafire.com/file/eyakv8..._T109.sav/file


    Last edited by Der Böse Wolf; February 28, 2021 at 04:07 PM.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  13. #1493

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)


    Samuel and Godwin lewes changed the tax rates within the isle of mann, devoting most of their funding to ship building ever eager to fulfill their side of their bargain that had helped secure their new base of operations, but still the irish navy was too numerous and too strong to break the blockade of the island. Meanwhile back on the mainland duke Geoffrey kept his distance from the grand politics and struggles on the field, happy just to secure his monies and the control of his areas, little changed in the midlands, as all eyes where on ireland and the struggles there between the Scottish attempts to expand, and the irish efforts to repel the invaders, and all would be following such events closely.


    Turn to england

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/j73y33zkqq...d_110.sav?dl=0
    ---------------

    Lincoln

    {Newport Arch}

    Earliest history
    The earliest origins of Lincoln can be traced to the remains of an Iron Age settlement of round wooden dwellings (which were discovered by archaeologists in 1972) that have been dated to the 1st century BC. This settlement was built by a deep pool (the modern Brayford Pool) in the River Witham at the foot of a large hill (on which the Normans later built Lincoln Cathedral and Lincoln Castle).

    The origins of the name Lincoln may come from this period, when the settlement is thought to have been named in the Brittonic language of Iron Age Britain's Celtic inhabitants as Lindon "The Pool",presumably referring to Brayford Pool (compare the etymology of the name Dublin, from the Gaelic dubh linn "black pool"). The extent of this original settlement is unknown as its remains are now buried deep beneath the later Roman and medieval ruins and modern Lincoln.


    Roman history: Lindum Colonia
    The Romans conquered this part of Britain in AD 48 and shortly afterwards built a legionary fortress high on a hill overlooking the natural lake formed by the widening of the River Witham (the modern day Brayford Pool) and at the northern end of the Fosse Way Roman road (A46). The Celtic name Lindon was subsequently Latinised to Lindum and given the title Colonia when it was converted into a settlement for army veterans.

    The conversion to a colonia was made when the legion moved on to York (Eboracum) in AD 71. Lindum colonia or more fully, Colonia Domitiana Lindensium, after the Emperor Domitian who ruled at the time, was established within the walls of the hilltop fortress with the addition of an extension of about equal area, down the hillside to the waterside below.

    It became a major flourishing settlement, accessible from the sea both through the River Trent and through the River Witham. On the basis of the patently corrupt list of British bishops who attended the 314 Council of Arles, the city is now often considered to have been the capital of the province of Flavia Caesariensis which was formed during the late-3rd century Diocletian Reforms. Subsequently, the town and its waterways fell into decline. By the close of the 5th century it was largely deserted, although some occupation continued under a Praefectus Civitatis – Saint Paulinus visited a man holding this office in Lincoln in AD 629.

    [IMG][/IMG]


    AD 410–1066
    Germanic tribes from the North Sea area settled Lincolnshire during the fifth and sixth centuries. The Latin Lindum Colonia was shortened in their language, Old English, first to Lindocolina, then to Lincylene.

    After the first Viking raids, the city again rose to some importance, with overseas trading connections. In Viking times Lincoln was a trading centre with its own mint, by far the most important in Lincolnshire and by the end of the 10th century, comparable in output to that of York.After the establishment of the Danelaw in 886, Lincoln became one of the Five Boroughs in the East Midlands. Excavations at Flaxengate reveal that the area, deserted since Roman times, received timber-framed buildings fronting a new street system in about 900.[10] Lincoln underwent an economic explosion with the settlement of the Danes. Like York, the Upper City seems to have had purely administrative functions up to 850 or so, while the Lower City, down the hill towards the River Witham, may have been largely deserted. By 950, however, the Witham banks were developed, with the Lower City resettled and the suburb of Wigford emerging as a trading centre. In 1068, two years after the Norman conquest of England, William I ordered Lincoln Castle to be built on the site of the old Roman settlement, for the same strategic reasons and controlling the same road.

    Cathedral
    Construction of the first Lincoln Cathedral, within its close or walled precinct facing the castle, began when the see was removed from the quiet backwater of Dorchester-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, and was completed in 1092; it was rebuilt after a fire but destroyed by an earthquake in 1185. The rebuilt Lincoln Minster, enlarged to the east at each rebuilding, was on a magnificent scale, its crossing tower crowned by a spire reputed to have been the highest in Europe at 525 ft (160 m). When completed, the central of the three spires is widely accepted to have succeeded the Great Pyramids of Egypt as the tallest man-made structure in the world.

    The Lincoln bishops were among the magnates of medieval England. The Diocese of Lincoln, the largest in England, had more monasteries than the rest of England put together, and the diocese was supported by large estates. When Magna Carta was drawn up in 1215, one of the witnesses was Hugh of Wells, Bishop of Lincoln. One of only four surviving originals of the document is preserved in Lincoln Castle.


    Lincoln Cathedral
    Among the most famous bishops of Lincoln were Robert Bloet, the magnificent justiciar to Henry I, Hugh of Avalon, the cathedral builder canonised as St Hugh of Lincoln, Robert Grosseteste, the 13th century intellectual, Henry Beaufort, chancellor of Henry V and Henry VI, Thomas Rotherham, a politician deeply involved in the Wars of the Roses, Philip Repyngdon, chaplain to Henry IV and defender of Wycliffe, and Thomas Wolsey, the lord chancellor of Henry VIII. Theologian William de Montibus was the head of the cathedral school and chancellor until his death in 1213.

    The administrative centre was the Bishop's Palace, the third element in the central complex. When it was built in the late 12th century, the Bishop's Palace was one of the most important buildings in England. Built by Hugh of Lincoln, its East Hall over a vaulted undercroft is the earliest surviving example of a roofed domestic hall. The chapel range and entrance tower were built by Bishop William of Alnwick, who modernised the palace in the 1430s. Both Henry VIII and James I were guests there; the palace was sacked by royalist troops during the civil war in 1648.




    Medieval town
    During the Anarchy, in 1141 Lincoln was the site of a battle between King Stephen and the forces of Empress Matilda, led by her illegitimate half-brother Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester. After fierce fighting in the city's streets, Stephen's forces were defeated. Stephen himself was captured and taken to Bristol.

    By 1150, Lincoln was among the wealthiest towns in England. The basis of the economy was cloth and wool, exported to Flanders; Lincoln weavers had set up a guild in 1130 to produce Lincoln Cloth, especially the fine dyed "scarlet" and "green", whose reputation was later enhanced by the legendary Robin Hood wearing woollens of Lincoln green. In the Guildhall that surmounts the city gate called the Stonebow, the ancient Council Chamber contains Lincoln's civic insignia, a fine collection of civic regalia.

    Outside the precincts of cathedral and castle, the old quarter clustered around the Bailgate, and down Steep Hill to the High Bridge, whose half-timbered housing juts out over the river. There are three ancient churches: St Mary le Wigford and St Peter at Gowts are both 11th century in origin and St Mary Magdalene, built in the late 13th century. The last is an unusual English dedication to the saint whose cult was coming into vogue on the European continent at that time.

    Lincoln was home to one of the five main Jewish communities in England, well established before it was officially noted in 1154. In 1190, anti-Semitic riots that started in King's Lynn, Norfolk, spread to Lincoln; the Jewish community took refuge with royal officials, but their habitations were plundered. The so-called House of Aaron has a two-storey street frontage that is essentially 12th century and a nearby Jew's House likewise bears witness to the Jewish population. In 1255, the affair called "The Libel of Lincoln" in which prominent Jews of Lincoln, accused of the ritual murder of a Christian boy (the Little Saint Hugh of Lincoln in medieval folklore) were sent to the Tower of London and 18 were executed. The Jews were expelled in total in 1290.

    Thirteenth-century Lincoln was England's third largest city and a favourite of more than one king. During the First Barons' War, it became caught up in the strife between the king and rebel barons who had allied with the French. It was here and at Dover that the French and Rebel army was defeated. In the aftermath, the town was pillaged for having sided with Prince Louis. In the Second Barons' War, of 1266, the disinherited rebels attacked the Jews of Lincoln, ransacked the synagogue, and burned the records which registered debts.

    According to some historians, the city's fortunes began to decline in the 14th century, although others have argued that the city remained buoyant in both trade and communications well into the 15th century. Thus in 1409, the city was made a county in its own right known as the County of the City of Lincoln. Thereafter, additional rights being conferred on the town by successive monarchs, including those of an assay town (controlling metal manufacturing, for example).The oldest surviving secular drama in English, The Interlude of the Student and the Girl (c. 1300), may have originated from Lincoln.

    Lincoln's coat of arms, not officially endorsed by the College of Arms, is believed to date from the 14th century. It is Argent on a cross gules a fleur-de-lis or. The cross is believed to derive from the Diocese of Lincoln. The fleur-de-lis is the symbol of the Virgin Mary, to whom the cathedral is dedicated. The motto is CIVITAS LINCOLNIA (Latin for City of Lincoln).




    Lincoln Castle

    Early history
    After William the Conqueror defeated Harold Godwinson and the English at the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066, he continued to face resistance to his rule in the north of England. For a number of years, William's position was very insecure. In order to project his influence northwards to control the people of the Danelaw (an area that had for a time been under the control of Scandinavian settlers), he constructed a number of major castles in the North and Midlands of England: including those at Cambridge, Huntingdon, Lincoln, Nottingham, Warwick and York.

    When William reached Lincoln (one of the country's major settlements), he found a Viking commercial and trading centre with a population of 6,000 to 8,000. The remains of the old Roman walled fortress, located 60 metres (200 ft) above the countryside to the south and west, proved an ideal strategic position to construct a new castle. Lincoln was also a vital strategic crossroads of the following routes (largely the same routes which influenced the siting of the Roman fort)

    Ermine Street - a major Roman road and England's main north–south route, connecting London and York.
    Fosse Way - another important Roman route connecting Lincoln with the city of Leicester and the south-west of England.
    The valley of the River Trent (to the west and southwest) - a major river affording access to the River Ouse, and thus the major city of York.
    The River Witham - a waterway connected to the River Trent (via the Fossdyke Roman canal at Torksey) and to the North Sea via The Wash.
    The Lincolnshire Wolds - an upland area to the northeast of Lincoln, which overlooks the Lincolnshire Marsh beyond.
    A castle here could guard several of the main strategic routes and form part of a network of strongholds of the Norman kingdom, in the former Danish Mercia, roughly the area today referred to as the East Midlands, to control the country internally.

    The Domesday Survey of 1086 directly records 48 castles in England, with two in Lincolnshire including one in Lincoln. Building a castle within an existing settlement sometimes meant existing structures had to be removed: of the castles noted in the Domesday Book, thirteen included references to property being destroyed to make way for the castle. In Lincoln's case 166 "unoccupied residences" were pulled down to clear the area on which the castle would be built.

    Work on the new fortification was completed in 1068. Probably at first a wooden keep was constructed, which was later replaced with a much stronger stone one. Lincoln Castle is very unusual in having two mottes, the only other surviving example of such a design being at Lewes. To the south, where the Roman wall stands on the edge of a steep slope, it was retained partially as a curtain wall and partially as a revetment retaining the mottes. In the west, where the ground is more level, the Roman wall was buried within an earth rampart and extended upward to form the Norman castle wall. The Roman west gate (on the same site as the castle's west gate) was excavated in the 19th century but began to collapse on exposure, and so was re-buried.

    The castle was the focus of attention during the First Battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141, during the struggle between King Stephen and Empress Matilda over who should be monarch in England. A new tower, called the Lucy Tower, was built on the site.

    Lincoln Castle was again besieged before the Second Battle of Lincoln, on 20 May 1217, during the reign of Henry III of England during the course of the First Barons' War. This was the period of political struggle that followed the sealing of Magna Carta on 15 June 1215. After this, a new barbican was built onto the west and east gates. In 1375, one Agatha Lovel—"notoriously suspect" in the murder of her master, Sir William de Cantilupe—escaped justice by bribing her Lincoln Castle gaolers, where she had been imprisoned awaiting trial. The bailiffs, Thomas Thornhaugh and John Bate, were later arrested and tried for allowing Agatha to escape justice, but were either pardoned or acquitted.


    Layout and architecture
    Lincoln Castle is bounded by a stone curtain wall, with ditches on all sides except the south. From an early stage, the outer walls which enclose the site were built in stone and they date from before 1115. On the south side the walls are interrupted by two earthen mounds called mottes. One is in the south-east corner, and was probably an original feature of William's the Conqueror's castle, while the other occupies the south-west corner. A square tower, the Observatory Tower, stands on top of the first mound, standing above the outer walls to dominate the city of Lincoln. The second mound is crowned by the 'Lucy Tower', which was probably built in the 12th century and was named after Lucy of Bolingbroke, the Countess of Chester until 1138.




    Battle of Lincoln (1141)

    {The battle of Lincoln, 1141; A - Welsh forces; B - Robert of Gloucester; C - Alan; D - Stephen; E - William; F - Fosse Dyke; G - Lincoln Castle; H - Lincoln Cathedral; I - City of Lincoln; J - River Witham}


    The Battle of Lincoln, or the First Battle of Lincoln, occurred on 2 February 1141 in Lincoln, England between King Stephen of England and forces loyal to Empress Matilda. Stephen was captured during the battle, imprisoned, and effectively deposed while Matilda ruled for a short time.

    The forces of King Stephen of England had been besieging Lincoln Castle but were themselves attacked by a relief force loyal to Empress Matilda and commanded by Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester, Matilda's half-brother. The Angevin army consisted of the divisions of Robert's men, those of Ranulf, Earl of Chester and those disinherited by Stephen, while on the flank was a mass of Welsh troops led by Madog ap Maredudd, Lord of Powys, and Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd. Cadwaladr was the brother of Owain, King of Gwynedd, but Owain did not support any side in the Anarchy. Stephen's force included William of Ypres; Simon of Senlis; Gilbert of Hertford; William of Aumale, Alan of Richmond and Hugh Bigod but was markedly short of cavalry.

    As soon as the battle was joined, the majority of the leading magnates fled the king. Other important magnates captured with the king were Baldwin fitz Gilbert; Bernard de Balliol, Roger de Mowbray; Richard de Courcy; William Peverel of Nottingham; Gilbert de Gant; Ingelram de Say; Ilbert de Lacy and Richard fitzUrse, all men of respected baronial families; it had only been the Earls who had fled.

    Even as the royal troops listened to the exhortations of Stephen's lieutenant, Baldwin fitz Gilbert, the advancing enemy was heard and soon the disinherited Angevin knights charged the cavalry of the five earls. On the left Earl William Aumale of York and William Ypres charged and smashed the poorly armed, 'but full of spirits', Welsh division but were themselves in turn routed 'in a moment' by the well-ordered military might of Earl Ranulf who stood out from the mass in 'his bright armour'. The earls, outnumbered and outfought, were soon put to flight and many of their men were killed and captured. King Stephen and his knights were rapidly surrounded by the Angevin force.

    Then might you have seen a dreadful aspect of battle, on every quarter around the king's troop fire flashing from the meeting of swords and helmets – a dreadful crash, a terrific clamour – at which the hills re-echoed, the city walls resounded. With horses spurred on, they charged the king's troop, slew some, wounded others, and dragging some away, made them prisoners.

    No rest, no breathing time was granted them, except in the quarter where stood that most valiant king, as the foe dreaded the incomparable force of his blows. The earl of Chester, on perceiving this, envying the king his glory, rushed upon him with all the weight of his armed men. Then was seen the might of the king, equal to a thunderbolt, slaying some with his immense battle-axe, and striking others down.

    Then arose the shouts afresh, all rushing against him and him against all. At length through the number of the blows, the king's battle-axe was broken asunder. Instantly, with his right hand, drawing his sword, well worthy of a king, he marvellously waged the combat, until the sword as well was broken asunder.

    On seeing this William Kahamnes, a most powerful knight, rushed upon the king, and seizing him by the helmet, cried with a loud voice, "Hither, all of you come hither! I have taken the king!"
    — Roger de Hoveden, writing in the late 12th century

    The rest of his division fought on with no hope of escape until all were killed or had surrendered. Baldwin fitz Richard and Richard fitz Urse 'having received many wounds, and, by their determined resistance, having gained immortal honour' were taken prisoner.

    After fierce fighting in the city's streets, Stephen's forces were defeated.Stephen himself was captured and taken to Bristol, where he was imprisoned. He was subsequently exchanged for Robert of Gloucester, who was later captured in the Rout of Winchester the following September. This ended Matilda's brief ascendancy in the wars with Stephen.


    Incidental information
    The Welsh contingent of the Angevin forces included Maredudd and Cadwgan,two of the five sons of Madog ap Idnerth, who (when he lived) was the ruling prince of Fferllys.Conversely, Stephen was aided by prominent Marcher Lords, like Hugh de Mortimer. Following the Battle, his cause seeming lost, Hugh turned his attention to Fferllys, and invaded its northern parts the following year, killing Cadwgan (and Cadwgan's brother Hywel).In 1146, he invaded the south of Fferllys, and killed Maredudd.Matlida's son, Henry, forced Hugh to surrender his Welsh possessions; Fferllys was divided between Madog's surviving sons, Cadwallon (who received Maelienydd) and Einion Clud (who received Elfael).



    Battle of Lincoln (1217)
    Barons' Wars
    The Second Battle of Lincoln occurred at Lincoln Castle on Saturday 20 May 1217, during the First Barons' War, between the forces of the future Louis VIII of France and those of King Henry III of England. Louis's forces were attacked by a relief force under the command of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. Thomas, the Comte du Perche, commanding the French troops, was killed and Louis was expelled from his base in the southeast of England. The looting that took place afterwards is known as the "Lincoln Fair". The citizens of Lincoln were loyal to Louis so Henry's forces sacked the city.



    Background
    In 1216, during the First Barons' War over the English succession, Prince Louis of France entered London and proclaimed himself King of England. Louis was supported by various English barons who resisted the rule of King John. John died in the middle of the war, and his nine-year-old son Henry III was crowned by the English.

    Once John died, many barons were willing to change sides and fight for Henry against Prince Louis' claim. William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a knight of great skill and prowess, served as regent for Henry. Marshal called all nobles holding castles in England to a muster in Newark. Approximately 400 knights, 250 crossbowmen, and a larger auxiliary force of both mounted and foot soldiers were assembled.Marshal marched his forces to the city of Lincoln to break Prince Louis's siege.


    Battlefield
    Medieval Lincoln was an ancient walled city with a Norman castle near its centre,straddling the crossroads of two important Roman-built highways: Ermine Street and the Fosse Way. These trans-England routes were historic and major arteries for national trade and government, making Lincoln a strategic location. William the Conqueror had ordered the construction of Lincoln Castle on a hilltop over an old Roman fort 150 years earlier.

    At the time of the battle in May 1217, Louis's forces had taken the city of Lincoln, but Lincoln Castle remained intact. Its garrison, commanded by castellan Nichola de la Haye, was loyal to King Henry and continued to defend the important fortification from forces loyal to Prince Louis, led by Thomas, the Count of Perche.


    Battle
    Marshal's forces made their approach from the town of Stow, a few miles northwest of Lincoln. The advance was known to Thomas, Count of Perche, but his knights were uncertain as to the enemy's strength.Two strategies were formed. Those who believed Marshal's force was relatively small in number favoured an offensive plan: a meeting in an open battlefield at the base of the hill, before Marshal could reach the city gates. Those who believed Marshal had a dangerously large force favoured a more defensive plan: delay Marshal at the gates of the city wall, and at the same time press the siege, capture the castle, and occupy this much stronger position. The defensive plan was taken, though not without some continuing dissension.

    Marshal proceeded to the section of the city walls nearest the castle, at the north gate. All of Marshal's crossbowmen, led by the nobleman Falkes de Breauté, assaulted and took the gate. Perche's forces did not respond, but continued the castle siege.

    Marshal's main force secured the north gate, while Breauté's crossbowmen took up high positions on the rooftops of houses.Volleys of bolts from this high ground rained death, damage and confusion on Perche's forces. Then, in the final blow, Marshal's knights and footsoldiers charged Perche's siege forces. Perche was offered a surrender, but fought to the death as the siege collapsed into a scattered rout.Those of Louis's army who were not captured fled Lincoln, by the south city gate, to London. The battle took about six hours.

    Aftermath and effects
    The city of Lincoln was pillaged by Marshal's victorious army, on the pretence that it was loyal to Louis, later euphemistically called 'the Lincoln Fair'.To the south, inhabitants of towns between Lincoln and London ambushed and killed some of the escaping French soldiers on their flight south to London.

    The Battle of Lincoln was the turning point in the First Barons' War.Many of Henry's enemies—barons who had supported Louis, and who helped supply, organise and command Louis's military forces—were captured at Lincoln. French reinforcements, under the command of Eustace the Monk, were then sent across the English Channel to bolster Louis's forces. The French ships were defeated by Hubert de Burgh in the Battle of Dover. This defeat greatly reduced the French threat to the English crownand Prince Louis and his remaining forces returned to France.In September 1217, the treaty of Lambeth forced Louis to give up his claim to the English throne and to eject Eustace's brothers from the Channel Islands.
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz



  14. #1494
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby Bunny
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    England


    The Irish threat had abated for the time being and they were content with flexing their naval superiority. The entire east coast of the main isle was blockaded. This meant trade had to flow mostly on land, slowing down production of wares nationwide. Caravans moved slow and were prime targets for looters. The flow of coin stagnated. Something had to be done about it.

    Ireland up: https://www.mediafire.com/file/5rz11...d_110.sav/file

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  15. #1495
    Aexodus's Avatar Persuasion>Coercion
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    need another day please and thank you
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himster View Post
    The trick is to never be honest. That's what this social phenomenon is engineering: publicly conform, or else.

  16. #1496
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Wales up! DMing Turk the CS

    Pics https://imgur.com/a/psSNThf



    The Scots, through carelessness or overconfidence, saw fit to spread their forces thin. The Irish generals heard word of a large encampment outside Derry, and opted to strike as a joint force. For some reason, the Derry garrison saw fit to assist the army outside the gates in spite of overwhelming odds. Suffice to say, the Derry garrison has been decimated, and Lough Foyle has been cut off from Scottish supply ships. Elsewhere, the Welsh army at county down no longer able to feed their troops, has made to turn around and return to Wales. What the renegade Welsh general will face for his betrayal is unknown...
    Last edited by Aexodus; March 07, 2021 at 02:38 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himster View Post
    The trick is to never be honest. That's what this social phenomenon is engineering: publicly conform, or else.

  17. #1497
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby Bunny
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    I thought paladinbob was going to play Wales? Or am I mistaken? I'm happy either way tbh. What do you say PDB?

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  18. #1498

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    I thought paladinbob was going to play Wales? Or am I mistaken? I'm happy either way tbh. What do you say PDB?
    again ..either way..happy to do it, or happy for turkafinwe to do it......whatever the case, it is sure, that england has influence over what is happening in wales..but i leave the decision in turkafinwe's hands
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz



  19. #1499
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Alright I'll take them in my care then if nobody minds. I'll play tonight.

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  20. #1500
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    I'm fine with taking control of Wales or perhaps just playing as Wales as well as England. That way I still have to juggle two factions instead of having the advantage of one unified faction.
    Make sure you don't play rhydderch's army out of character
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himster View Post
    The trick is to never be honest. That's what this social phenomenon is engineering: publicly conform, or else.

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