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Thread: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

  1. #1381

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    The Irish advance was very swift.
    Men clad in heavy armour have already landed and besiege the mighty fortress of Carnarvon.

    The Welsh were caught off guard!
    The armies of the crown rush west to defend their vassal...

    Chaos is about to engulf the lands...again...

    -----

    In the royal palace, at Perth...
    -------------------

    "He was found in the lowlands, near Carlisle, Sire. We dealt with him swiftly..."
    The Master of Espionage showed King Hew the head of an English spy.

    "You realise we have a fragile truce with the Crown. The last thing we need is the resumption of hostilities while we are still recovering from the plague which ravaged our military and economy...."
    The head advisor, who despised the Master of Espionage, was making his case before he was interrupted by the King.

    "Hunt down any foreign agents in the realm. Truce or not. We cannot afford to have infiltrators wander around while a great war is about to rage on our southern borders.
    We need to be very cautious.
    Summon the Clans for a war council."
    Hew then stood up, looked at the severed head, then left the room.





    ----

    Barons next: http://www.mediafire.com/file/ty0bcje6i57ubbl/TIOC_Barons_102.sav/file
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  2. #1382

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)



    Duke Geoffrey lifted his wine goblet, hosting a toast to the visiting nobles keeping up the endless diplomacy , that his position required, but his thoughts jumped back to the current situation in the isles. Chaos had returned with the irish invasion, and the english were making moves to counter it. Scotland he knew would act somewhere in response for they could'nt allow the very uneasy fact , that would allow either england or ireland to take a prominent position on the isles, and terrority , for it would strength there enemies , and weaken their position .

    Somewhere in the midst of this quagmire, was a possibility of advancement for him and his faction, especially with his own rogue element, the Lewes family cast into the mix, such a ripple they would make with their actions could dim or raise up his chances which he was thinking of, for in this time of three great factions, things were finally balanced indeed.


    --------------------------

    As waylander expected, a Scottish assassin appeared into his area of influence, looking to checkout the disappearance of the agent and he took little time , in tracking him down ,leaving him dead, pinned to a tree with a crossbow bolt left on his chest and a bloody message, to any other Scottish agents, that they should keep clear of Yorkish lands.

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    -------------------

    Weirdly, somebody supporting the lewes faction had put a price out on the current english kings head, prehaps hoping to push the lewes family to prominence , at such a deed taking place, but the price held little interest for waylander it seems, for he had other concerns at the moment, but the leak of the contract did leak out, as the rumours spread that the english kings head, would give a bounty of money , if such a deed could be achieved...this might be of interest , perhaps to the irish or even the scottish ?

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    turn to england
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/bem0o2w005...d_103.sav?dl=0
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  3. #1383

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    This Waylander is haunting me...
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  4. #1384
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby of TWC
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    England



    Jasper Lewes sat in his tent in the warcamp of his army. Once again they were on their way to Wales, this time not to conquer it but to defend it. The very same troops that had stormed the walls of Cardiff and Pembroke now stood to defend the very same against Irish invaders. Two large contingents of Irishmen had already disembarked at Caernarvon and only time would tell how quickly the plague ridden citadel would fall. Jasper was reading a couple of letters that had been addressed to him. Most of them were requests from the quartermaster in regards to various supplies. One paper did peak his interest, a letter from his brothers Samuel and Godwine. Jasper read the letter and was astounded. A murder plot to kill Anselm? Gowine and Samuel were frightened the Lord Protector might have gotten wind of a murder plot and wished to distance themselves from it. Jasper chuckled and grabbed a pen. "Dear Samuel and Godwine, I know of the murder plot because I was the one who contacted the nobles of the North to contact Waylander for me. The death of Anselm would be a boon for not only the English people but the Lewes'. Please contact the infamous agent on my behalf. Tell noone. Yours, Jasper Lewes." Jasper sealed the letter and called in one of his most trusted servants. "Get this to my brothers in the North." he said with a saying look. The man put the paper inside a leather satchel under his cloak. "It will be done my Lord." the man said bowing before leaving the general's tent.

    Ireland up: http://www.mediafire.com/file/n8aetp...d_103.sav/file

    Chapter XXIX: Aldburg
    #JusticeForAkar #JusticeForCal #JusticeForCookie #JusticeForAthelchan



  5. #1385

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Hi guys, what is the situation with Zender and Ireland?

    Is he still in?

    Cheers,

    DBW
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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  6. #1386
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby of TWC
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    No idea. I have sent a VM to zender about the turn. Perhaps the transition to the new player is still happening.

    Chapter XXIX: Aldburg
    #JusticeForAkar #JusticeForCal #JusticeForCookie #JusticeForAthelchan



  7. #1387
    Jadli's Avatar The Fallen God
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    We are helping Flower to fix his mod, hopefully will be sorted today. Sorry for delay, I have been busy

  8. #1388
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby of TWC
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    NP. Hopefully it will be solved without too much of a struggle.

    Chapter XXIX: Aldburg
    #JusticeForAkar #JusticeForCal #JusticeForCookie #JusticeForAthelchan



  9. #1389

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Alright well someone's gotta sub Ireland if this new person ain't gonna.

  10. #1390
    zender9's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Wales up:
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen..._wales_103.sav


    Irish invasion continued with 2 spies entering the fort which was defended by Robert Blegywryd. The fort was under effect of plague, Robert's company was looking sick and weak. It was as if an abandoned fort. A place where you would send sick people to die. But Robert wasn't an abandoned man, and the fort was needed to be captured for Irish invasion to continue.

    High King Lochlainn ordered 240 men to assault the fort in the night. There wasn't much of a defence and Irish spies found an easy door to get the men inside. Welsh soldiers who weren't sick yet put up a good fight and killed over 50 Irish soldiers, but once they were the defeated, the weak soldiers surrender. Young Robert himself fought bravely to death.

    Fort was under Irish control now. In Robert's chamber, a letter from King Anselm was found. It was quickly delivered to High King Lochlainn. In the letter, King Alselm described location of his army and that they will camp in the woods. This was a great opportunity to meet King Alselm on the field of battle and defeat him. But the siege of Caernarvon was still going and it was impossible to defeat King Anselm with the remaining forces. Caernarvon had to fall with all haste regardless of the plague inside.

    And so it did. Trebuchets managed to make a breach in the walls that allowed a successful assault. Once all the attentions of defending forces were at the breach, Irish soldiers went forward with ladders and quickly captured the walls and towers. Most of mercenaries inside were suffering from the plague and surrender quickly. It was a clear victory. Mercenaries were disbanded and sent away. Not much forces left in the castle and they marched to face King Anselm.


    High King Lochlainn personally wanted to lead the army against King Alselm. So he met with the elite units coming from the Caernarvon siege. Together they were outnumbering King Alselm's army. Both armies consisted of heavy infantry except some english bowmen and cavalry. Yet English weren't expecting a fight. Battle ready and bloodthirsty Irish elite knights with the number advantage surrounded English forces and defeated King Anselm heavily. English suffered 4 times more deaths in the field. And High King Lochlainn ordered the prisoners to be executed. King Alselm managed to flee south with some men left.

    This will surely teach him a lesson, and Lochlainn asked Anselm to accept his defeat and leave Wales.
    Nevertheless signs of plague amongst Irish soldiers are appearing and this is not good. Perhaps the plague will turn the tides, but for now Irish invasion is going on with full sucess.

    Altough there are rumours of English navy sailing south of Irish Sea, the dominance of Irish fleet continues.



  11. #1391

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Scotland up: http://www.mediafire.com/file/eqg8f2...d_103.sav/file

    Caernarvon it seems fell with little to no struggle. King Lochlainn in his malevolence also slaughtered a fortress converted into a hospital of sorts for the ailing peasants. There would be no mercy from the Irish, it seemed. A nobleman of some note, also suffering from the plague, was caught up in the assault. Vortiper rallied his forces and headed for Montgomery. Another war had begun in earnest.

    https://youtu.be/pk9SOBa-BoY

    Welsh spies tried, with no avail, to scout out the remaining numbers of Lochlainn's army. They had encamped themselves well in the highland forest, using the terrain to their advantage, with sentries placed well along the tree line willing to intercept any spy foolish enough to attempt an infiltration. A Scottish spy has also been found in the north, yet Vortiper stayed the hands of his assassins. Perhaps the Scotts may yet be Wale's salvation in this matter, depending on how the dice were to fall..?

  12. #1392
    Jadli's Avatar The Fallen God
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    yea, sorry for the delay guys. We have been trying to help Flower fix his mod, unsuccessfully, so in the end I asked zender if he could play on

  13. #1393

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)




    News of the fall of the mighty fortress of Caernarvon and, most dramatically, the defeat of the army of the Lord Protector of the Crown spread like wildfire in the Scottish Realm.
    The hall of King Hew was overwhelmed with messengers from the four corners of Britannia, each coming to plead and negotiate.

    At the same time, and as anticipated, Hew had called for a general Clans council.

    Chieftains from all over Scotland gathered in Perth.



    Talks were held for days.

    Finally, a decision has been made.

    "Dispatch the messengers!"
    King Hew gave the order and a whole host of men, riding swift border horses, left the city gates carrying orders and letters...

    ------------

    Barons next: http://www.mediafire.com/file/si131c...s_103.sav/file

    PS: Meatpuppet: Wales have two assassins on the field, which is against the rules, since you do not have enough settlements to be able to field two of them. You are only allowed one.
    Last edited by Der Böse Wolf; November 04, 2020 at 04:55 AM.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  14. #1394

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)



    The news of the irish invasion reverberated around the kingdom, and its impact of irish success , made lords and nobles turn there heads and attention, to the rise of irish power and the inevitable english effort to respond. Scotland appeared to be mobilizing their armies as well , and the northern shires likewise were in the midst of movement . Deployment though proved differicult as the second army under Nicolas the scarred , had unfortunately carried some troops who still had the plague, and with the obvious lack of sanitation , with a army of the move, it spread thoughtout the ranks in very little time . So the army had to make continual stops , as troops had to be replenished, as those ill left the ranks, to be replaced by fitter replacements , who had been marched over in camps.

    -------------

    Waylander however , caught the whiff of another scottish spy, whether it was the haggis the spy was cooking on the road, or whether it was the mans broad accent that gave it away , his identity was known, and as the small caravan party settled down for the night, it took waylander little trouble to sneak into their camp, avoiding the near asleep caravan guard, finding the Scottish agent, and slitting his throat, before departing in the dead of the night. It was to this horror that those in the caravan , found one of their paying customers, who would now ,never reach england , or send back information on waylander.

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    On the other side of business however, Waylander stopped at one of his deaddrops, and found a note , for a contract, with new extra details, which he considered deeply, before burning the note, and letting the ash fly away on the wind.

    turn to england
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/uefpvmgi3t...d_104.sav?dl=0

    ---------------
    NB: For some history , i am picking ireland, which although it has some great history over the ages, is lacking great pictures/works of castles as resources in ireland are scant, thus most timber/stone works are taken by the local populance and reused in other works.But what we do have is some great clan history, characters and fights...so enjoy what you can whilst the lockdown continues..and try ..just try to pronouce some of those great gallic names [winks]



    [donegal & Mongevlin feature in the video]

    Lifford [settlement on the map]

    The town grew up around a castle built there by Manghus Ó Domhnaill, ruler of Tír Chonaill (mostly modern County Donegal), in the 16th century. It later became a British Army garrison town until Ireland won independence as a dominion in early December 1922. It lies across the River Foyle from Strabane (in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland) and is linked to that town by Lifford Bridge. Manus O'Donnell began building the castle in 1527 on the Wednesday after St. Brendan's day (Saint Brendan's feast day is celebrated on 16 May). He completed the masonry and woodwork by the end of that summer even though the O’Neill’s of Tír Eoghain were at war with him. In 1543 the castle of Leithbher was given to Cahir (the son of Donnell Balbh) O'Gallagher to be guarded for the O’Donnell clan. He then proceeded to banish the people loyal to the O’Donnell’s from the castle so that he could keep it for himself. In 1544 Calvagh, the son of O'Donnell, went to the English Lord Justice, and brought back English soldiers with him to Tirconnell, the olden name for County Donegal. O'Donnell, Calvagh, and these men went with ‘ordnance and engines for taking towns’ to the castle of Lifford to take it back from the descendants of the O'Gallaghers.

    Cahir, the son of Tuathal Balbh & Turlough, the son of Felim Fin O'Gallagher, who had been taken hostage earlier, was brought to the castle to see if the O’Gallagher’s would surrender. Which they wouldn’t. As the English attacked one was killed instantly so they killed Cahir, the son of Tuathal on the spot. The castle was then surrendered to O’Donnell to spare the life of Turlough, the son of Felim Fin and another son of Tuathal Balbh.

    Sadly, Lifford Castle is no longer standing but here is a poem from the late 16th century about the castle, it describes the owners and surroundings at the time.


    "A beloved dwelling is the castle of Lifford, homestead of a wealth abounding encampment; forge of hospitality for the men of Ulster, a dwelling it is hard to leave.
    Beloved are the two who keep that house without excess, without lack; the ward of the stout, even-surfaced tower are the supporting pillars of the province.
    Short is the day, no matter what its length, in the company of the royal warrior of Conchobhar's Plain; fleet are the long days from the lady of bright-walled Tara.
    The daughter of noble Shane O'Neill, and the son of O'Donnell of Dún Iomgháin—they are in the ancient, comely dwelling as entertainers of guests.
    Dear the hostel in which these are wont to be, dear the folk who dwell in the hostel; the people of the house and the house of that people happy is any who shall get honor such as theirs.
    Beloved the delightful, lofty building, its tables, its coverlets, its cupboards; its wondrous, handsome, firm walls, its smooth marble arches.
    Beloved is the castle in which we used to spend a while at chess-playing, a while with the daughters of the men of Bregia, a while with the fair books of the poets.
    The fortress of smooth-lawned Lifford no one in the world can leave it once it is found; that dwelling is the Durlas of the north.
    Or else it is Eamhain which used to vary in form, or Croghan of the children of Mágha, or Tara of the race of Cobhthach—this bright castle, rich in trees and horses.
    Or it is Naas, the fortress of Leinster, as it was first fashioned; or the fertile, ancient abode of the children of Corc, green, conspicuous Cashel.
    Or it is fair Lifford itself—hardly is any of these castles better—which hath of yore assumed those shapes ye are wont to hold dear".

    The Battle of Lifford was fought in 1600 during Tyrone's Rebellion.

    Following the defeat of O'Doherty's Rebellion at the Battle of Kilmacrennan in 1608, a number of captured rebels were brought to Lifford where they were tried by Irish civilian courts and executed. The most notable rebel to be executed was Phelim Reagh MacDavitt.


    Manus O'Donnell

    Manus O'Donnell (Irish: Manus Ó Domhnaill, died 1564) was an Irish lord and son of Sir Hugh Dubh O'Donnell. He was an important member of the O'Donnell dynasty based in County Donegal in Ulster.
    Early life
    Hugh Dubh (pronounced in Ulster Irish as 'Hugh Doo') had been Rí (king) of the O'Donnells during one of the bitterest and most protracted of the feuds between his clan and the O'Neills, which in 1491 led to a war lasting more than ten years. He left his son to rule Tyrconnell, though still a boy, when he went on a pilgrimage to Rome about 1511. On his return from Rome (via England, where he was knighted by King Henry VIII) in broken health after two years' absence, his son Manus, who had proved himself a capable leader in defending his country against the O'Neills, retained the chief authority. When Sir Hugh Dubh O'Donnell, as he was now, appealed for aid against his son to the Maguires, Manus made an alliance with the O'Neills, by whose assistance he established his hold over Tyrconnell. But in 1522 the two great northern clans were again at war.

    Conn O'Neill, An Ó Néill (who was created The 1st Earl of Tyrone in 1542), was determined to bring the O'Donnells under his rule. Supported by Munster and Connacht, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnell he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane. Here he was surprised at night by Sir Hugh Dubh and Manus O'Donnell, and routed with the loss of 900 men and an immense quantity of booty in the Battle of Knockavoe. Although this was one of the bloodiest ever battles between the O'Neills and the O'Donnells, it did not end the war; and in 1531 O'Donnell applied to the Lordship of Ireland for protection, giving assurances of allegiance to King Henry VIII.
    Geraldine League
    In February 1537, The 10th Earl of Kildare (previously known as Lord Offaly, and better known to history as 'Silken Thomas') and his five uncles were executed at Tyburn for their rebellion in Leinster. Following their executions, the English Crown made every effort to capture Gerald, 11th Earl of Kildare, the new head of the FitzGerald dynasty and the new claimant to the Earldom of Kildare, a boy of twelve who was in the secret custody of his aunt, Lady Eleanor McCarthy.

    Lady Eleanor, in order to secure a powerful protector for the boy, accepted an offer of marriage from Manus O'Donnell, who on the death of Sir Hugh Dubh in July 1537 was inaugurated as "The O'Donnell". Conn O'Neill (later Earl of Tyrone) was a relative of the young Lord Kildare, and this event accordingly led to the formation of the short-lived Geraldine League, a federation including the O'Neills, the O'Donnells, the O'Briens of Thomond, and other powerful clans; the primary object of which was to restore young Lord Kildare to his lands, titles and properties, but which afterwards aimed at the complete overthrow of English rule in Ireland.
    Chief of the O'Donnells
    In August 1539, O'Donnell and Conn O'Neill were heavily defeated by the Lord Deputy at Lake Bellahoe, in County Monaghan, which crippled their power for many years. In the west Manus made unceasing efforts to assert the supremacy of the O'Donnells in north Connacht, where he compelled O'Conor Sligo to acknowledge his over-lordship in 1539. In 1542 he went to England and presented himself, together with Conn O'Neill and other Irish chiefs, became a Protestant, and recognising Henry VIII, who promised to make him Earl of Tyrconnell, though he refused O'Donnell's request to be made Earl of Sligo. The assimilation process was known as "surrender and regrant".

    In his later years Manus was troubled by quarrels between his sons Calvagh and Hugh MacManus; in 1555 he was imprisoned by Calvagh, who deposed him from all authority in Tyrconnell, and he died in 1564. Manus O'Donnell, though a fierce warrior, was hospitable and generous to the poor and the Church. He is described by the Four Masters as "a learned man, skilled in many arts, gifted with a profound intellect, and the knowledge of every science." At his castle of Portnatrynod near Strabane he supervised, if he did not actually dictate, the writing of the Life of Saint Columbkille in Irish, which is preserved in the Bodleian Library (Rawlinson B 514) at Oxford. He was also a poet and many of his poems, written in Irish, survive.

    Manus was married several times. His first wife, Joan O'Reilly, was the mother of Calvagh, and two daughters, both of whom married O'Neills; the younger, Margaret, was wife of the famous rebel Shane O'Neill. His second wife, Hugh's mother, by whom he was ancestor of the Earls of Tyrconnell (see below), was Judith, sister of Conn Bacach O'Neill, 1st earl of Tyrone, and aunt of Shane.


    Phelim Reagh MacDavitt

    [ Dublin Gate 1608 displaying the heads of Irish rebels Cahir O'Doherty and Felim Riabhach McDavitt ]

    Phelim Reagh MacDavitt or Phelim Reagh MacDevitt (Irish: Feidhlimidh Riabhach Mac Dhaibheid, or Brindled Felim - probably a reference to a white streak or streaks in his hair) was a Gaelic Irish warrior and landowner notable for his participation in the Nine Years War and later in O'Doherty's Rebellion in 1608. After playing a leading part in the Burning of Derry, he was captured and executed following the Battle of Kilmacrennan.

    The MacDavitts were from Inishowen, in northern Donegal, directly north of the English bastion of Derry. They were foster brothers (some sources say foster fathers) of Cahir O'Doherty, who had the strongest claim to succeed as head of the O'Dohertys. When Red Hugh O'Donnell kidnapped Cahir during Tyrone's Rebellion, Phelim Reagh and his brother Hugh Boy MacDavitt changed sides, having previously supported the Irish cause. They now rescued Cahir from captivity and had him proclaimed head of the O'Dohertys by Henry Docwra, English governor of Derry. Both Cahir and his foster brothers served with distinction on the Crown's side during the war. They were disappointed when the Treaty of Mellifont 1603 restored lands to the rebels that had been promised to them.

    Both Cahir O'Doherty and Phelim Reagh had problems with local government officials in the years after the war, once the more friendly Docwra had been replaced, and both felt they were being pushed into rebellion by their treatment. This came to a head when O'Doherty was ordered to hand over Phelim Reagh because he wanted for arrest over allegations that had been made. O'Doherty reluctantly turned him over, but applied for his release. Eventually his lobbying was successful, and he was freed, just in time for him to take part in the rebellion.
    O'Doherty's Rebellion
    Burning of Derry
    O'Doherty planned to begin the rebellion by seizing the garrison town of Derry. MacDavitt helped lead the initial attack and capture of the Upper Fort of Derry. He was on hand when the Governor George Paulet (who was disliked by both Protestant settlers and Gaelic inhabitants) was killed. Derry was then burned to the ground.

    Kilmacrennan
    MacDavitt was at the decisive battle fought near Kilmacrennan where O'Doherty was killed and the rebels suffered a heavy defeat. After the battle, MacDavitt was cornered by a group of soldiers. He put up fierce resistance and was wounded and captured.

    MacDavitt was the most senior rebel to be executed. He was taken to Lifford, found guilty by a civilian court, and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered. His and O'Doherty's severed heads were exhibited on spikes on at the gates of Dublin, a common revenge on those accused of treason at the time.

    The participation of Phelim Reagh MacDavitt and others of the MacDavitts in the attack and destruction of Derry led to them becoming known as the "burn-Derrys".




    Battle of Kilmacrennan
    The Battle of Kilmacrennan was a skirmish fought near Kilmacrennan, County Donegal in 1608 during O'Doherty's Rebellion. Sir Cahir O'Doherty was a traditional supporter of the Crown whose treatment at the hands of local officials had led him to launch a rebellion in which he had seized the garrison town of Derry, killing his enemy George Paulet. O'Doherty raised local forces and possibly hoped to negotiate an agreement with the government as had been common with leaders of previous rebellions.

    However, the Viceroy in Dublin, Arthur Chichester, responded quickly and despatched reinforcements to the area under Richard Wingfield. They were a mixture of professional soldiers of the Royal Irish Army and Gaelic warriors allied to the government. They met the rebels at Kilmacrennan and O'Doherty was a killed by a musket shot to the head. His troops' morale collapsed and they fled the field. A £500 bounty had been placed on O'Doherty and, while a number of outlandish legends exist about the fate of his severed head, a reward was given to an infantry soldier John Trendor by the Dublin government.With O'Doherty's death, the rebellion quickly collapsed, the final forces retreating to Tory Island, where they were successfully besieged.




    Notable castle - Mongevlin[nr lifford]



    Mongavlin Castle also known as Mongevlin Castle is a ruined castle on the west bank of the River Foyle, approx 3 km south of St Johnston, County Donegal, Ireland. It was once a stronghold of the O'Donnell's, Lords of Tyrconnell.

    History
    In the sixteenth century Mongevlin was the chief residence of Ineen Dubh, who was the daughter of James MacDonald, 6th of Dunnyveg, and mother of Red Hugh O'Donnell. The State Paper recording her possession of the castle: " From Cul-Mac-Tryan runs a bogg three myles in length to the side of Lough Foyle in the midst of the bog is a standing loughe called Bunaber here at Bunaber dwells O'Donnell's mother (Ineen Dubh M'Donnell). Three miles above Cargan stands a fort called McGevyvelin (Mongivlin) upon the river of Lough Foyle O'Donnell's mother's chief house." When Ineen Dubh came to Ireland to marry Aodh mac Maghnusa Ó Domhnaill (Anglicized: Sir Hugh O'Donnell), she brought a force of 100 of the biggest men she could find in Scotland. These soldiers were her bodyguards, 80 of these were of the name Crawford. When the O’Donnell’s eventually abandoned Mongavlin the Crawford’s settled and married in the locality. Many of their descendants can still be found in the area to this day.

    In April 1608 following the Flight of the Earls (14 September 1607), Sir Cahir O'Doherty the last Gaelic Lord of Inishowen and rebel leader lays siege to the City of Derry. He had been angered that his lands had been confiscated for the plantation of Ulster. While Sir Cahir was trying to capture Derry he sent Sir Niall Garve O'Donnell to Lifford castle to repel any attempt by the English to send reinforcements to Derry by the river crossing at Lifford. Niall Garve being greedy wanted to be close to the action and have a chance of getting a good share of the spoils when Derry would be sacked. He instead of going to Lifford went to Mongavlin Castle and evicted Ineen Dubh. Here he began plundering the local area and on hearing the news of Niall Garve’s actions, Sir Cahir in turn evicted Niall Garve and reinstated Ineen Dubh in Mongavlin. Sir Cahir eventually sacks and burns Derry killing the Governor, Sir George Paulet in the process. Shortly after this the castle was abandoned due to the in-fighting of the O’Donnell clan.

    The present ruin was built by Sir John Stewart of Methven, an illegitimate son of the Duke of Lennox, who was also governor of Dumbarton Castle until he was convicted of cruelty and adultery. The castle was recorded by Captain Nicholas Pynnar in his Survey of the Escheated Counties of Ulster in 1619 where he wrote that Sir John Stewart had built a very strong castle at ‘Magerlin’ with a flanker at each corner. There had been a flag stone over the archway with the inscription 'J.S.-E.S.T.-1619' which went missing in the early eighteenth century. Though the account that the castle had been completed in 1619 is contradicted by a later Survey (in 1622) of the Escheated Counties of Ulster that reads; Sir John Stuart, assignee of the Duke of Lennox ‘has built a castle of lime and stone on the banks of the River Foyle 50’ x 25’ x ​3 1⁄2 stories, slated, with 4 flankers at the top thereof. And an iron door portcullis wise; the principal timber and joists of the floor being oak are laid but not boarded or the partitions made, the iron grates for the windows being within the castle ready to be set up’.

    Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox was granted Mongevlin Castle and lands of 1,000 acres by royal patent on 23 July 1610. On the death of Ludovic on 16 February 1624 the title of Duke of Lennox and the castle and lands at Mongavlin passed to his brother Esme (3rd Duke of Lennox). Esmé married Katherine Clifton, 2nd Baroness Clifton in 1609 and they had eleven children. After the death of Esmé in August 1624, Katherine then married James Hamilton (2nd Earl of Abercorn) circa 1632. James Hamilton, 6th Earl of Abercorn, and Viscount Strabane erected a plaque in memory of his mother, The Hon. Elizabeth Hamilton in 1704.

    James II of England visited here on his way to the siege of Derry in 1690. From here he sent a letter proposing surrender, it was rejected.The castle is now in ruins with only a small portion of it left standing.




    Battle of Lifford
    The Battle of Lifford was fought in County Donegal in October 1600, during the Nine Years' War in Ireland. A mixed Anglo-Irish force under Sir John Bolles and the Gaelic leaders Niall Garve O'Donnell and Sir Arthur O'Neill captured the strategic town of Lifford. A subsequent attempt to recapture it by forces led by Red Hugh O'Donnell failed.

    Lifford was both strategically and politically important as it stands where the River Finn and Mourne meet to form the Foyle and was a traditional stronghold of the O'Donnell dynasty. Niall was a rival claimant to be chief of the O'Donnells, and his presence at Lifford strengthened his claims.

    Niall had until recently fought alongside the Irish alliance, led by Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone and Niall's brother-in-law Red Hugh O'Donnell, but had changed sides following the landing of an English force at Derry the same year. Niall went over to support the English Crown with significant numbers of Gaelic troops, after he had been left in charge of the area while Red Hugh was away raiding south into Connacht. Red Hugh was outraged by Niall's defection, and in retaliation killed his young son.
    Siege and battle
    The English forces, commanded by Sir John Bolle, captured Lifford on 8 October. As they neared the town, the thirty strong Irish garrison set fire to the castle and withdrew, but much of the small town was unscathed. Red Hugh immediately tried to recapture Lifford, but his initial attempt, which involved skirmishing around Castle Finn, left around twelve dead on each side without retaking the town. His forces then blockaded the town, hoping to starve out its garrison. Red Hugh was reinforced by Scottish redshank mercenaries hired by his mother on his behalf.

    At the end of October, the garrison marched out to bring the besiegers to battle. Niall Garve led the cavalry forces and during the fighting he fought Red Hugh's younger brother Manus O'Donnell in single combat.Although it remained under occasional pressure, the garrison at Lifford was maintained for the rest of the war.
    Aftermath
    The success at Lifford validated Docwra's strategy of forming alliances with Gaelic leaders, which was criticised by others. Niall Garve O'Donnell's defection was one of a number in which powerful Ulster Gaelic figures switched sides, and the balance of power in Ulster gradually shifted. Over the next two years other important towns such as Donegal, which was captured by Niall Garve, and Ballyshannon were taken by allied Anglo-Irish forces. These became part of a pincer movement that allowed English troops at Derry, Dublin and Carrickfergus to penetrate into the heart of alliance-held territory in Tyrone.
    After the Treaty of Mellifont that ended the war in 1603, Lifford remained an important garrison town. It was able to hold out during O'Doherty's Rebellion in 1608 and troops from the town helped put down the rebellion.




    Donegal{& Donegal castle- on the map position]



    Donegal or Donegal Town (Irish: Dún na nGall, meaning "fort of the foreigners") is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. The name was historically written in English as Dunnagall or Dunagall. Although Donegal gave its name to the county, now Lifford is the county town. From the 1470s until the very early 17th century, Donegal was the 'capital' of Tyrconnell (Tír Chonaill), a Gaelic kingdom controlled by the O'Donnell dynasty of the Northern Uí Néill.

    Donegal sits at the mouth of the River Eske and Donegal Bay, which is overshadowed by the Blue Stack Mountains ('the Croaghs'). The Drummenny Burn, which flows along the eastern edge of Donegal Town, flows into the River Eske on the north-eastern edge of the town, between the Community Hospital and The Northern Garage. The Ballybofey Road (the R267) crosses the Drummenny Burn near where it flows into the River Eske. The town is bypassed by the N15 and N56 roads. The centre of the town, known as The Diamond, is a hub for music, poetic and cultural gatherings in the area.

    There is archaeological evidence for settlements around the town dating to prehistoric times, including the remains of ringforts and other defensive earthworks.

    Saint Patrick was captured by raiders from the clans governed by Niall of the Nine Hostages, and this region is that to which Patrick returned, being familiar with the people, language, customs and lands.The first clan to convert to Christianity as the result of St Patrick's efforts was Cenel Chonaill, the principal branch of which are the O'Donnells also known at one time as Clan Dálaigh. Connall was a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. As a result of their acceptance of Christianity, Patrick blessed the clan members; the sign of the cross appeared on the chieftain's shield and this became not only the heraldic device for the clan but also for County Donegal.


    {Donegal Town coat of arms)

    Donegal Town itself is famous for being the former centre of government of the O'Donnell dynasty, the great Gaelic royal family who ruled Tír Chonaill in west Ulster for centuries and who played a pivotal rôle in Irish history. Their original homeland lay further to the north in the area of Kilmacrennan. From the 15th to the 17th century, they were an important part of the opposition to the colonisation of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal Castle, on the banks of the River Eske, and the remains of Donegal Abbey, a Franciscan abbey which dates back to the 15th century on the Southern shore of the Bay. The Annals of the Four Masters may have been partially written in the old abbey in the 1630s. The story of Hugh Roe O'Donnell (Aodh Rua Ó Domhnaill, also known as "Red" Hugh II), Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney's The Fighting Prince of Donegal.

    In 1601 the Siege of Donegal took place during the Nine Years' War. After the Flight of the Earls from near Rathmullan in September 1607, the castle and its lands were seized by the English Crown and given to an Englishman, Captain Basil Brooke, as part of the Plantation of Ulster. Captain (later Sir) Basil Brooke (ancestor of the Viscounts Brookeborough) was granted the castle around 1611 and he proceeded to carry out major reconstruction work and added a wing to the castle in the Jacobean style. The current plan of the town was also laid out by Brooke, including an attractive town square known as The Diamond. From the late 17th until the early 20th centuries, Donegal Town formed part of the vast estates of the Gore family (from 1762 Earls of Arran in the Peerage of Ireland) and it was during their ownership that the town took on its present appearance.Donegal Borough returned two members to the Irish House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland, until the Acts of Union 1800 came into force in January 1801. Evidence of the Great Famine still exists, including a workhouse, whose buildings are now part of the local hospital, and many famine graves.



    Donegal Castle


    Donegal Castle (Irish: Caisleán Dhún na nGall) is a castle situated in the centre of Donegal Town in County Donegal in Ulster, Ireland. For most of the last two centuries, the majority of the buildings lay in ruins but the castle was almost fully restored in the early 1990s.

    The castle consists of a 15th-century rectangular keep with a later Jacobean style wing. The complex is sited on a bend in the River Eske, near the mouth of Donegal Bay, and is surrounded by a 17th-century boundary wall. There is a small gatehouse at its entrance mirroring the design of the keep. Most of the stonework was constructed from locally sourced limestone with some sandstone. The castle was the stronghold of the O'Donnell clan, Lords of Tír Conaill and one of the most powerful Gaelic families in Ireland from the 5th to the 16th centuries.

    Donegal translates as Fort of the Foreigner possibly coming from a Viking fortress in the area destroyed in 1159. However, due to hundreds of years of development, no archaeological evidence of this early fortress has been found. Red Hugh O'Donnell (Red Hugh I), wealthy chief of the O’Donnell clan, built the castle in 1474. At the same time, he and his wife Nuala built a Franciscan monastery further down the river. A local legend tells of a tunnel connecting the two but no evidence for this has been found. The castle was regarded as one of the finest Gaelic castles in Ireland. This was indicated by a report by the visiting English Viceroy, the Lord Deputy of Ireland, Sir Henry Sidney, in 1566, in a letter to William Cecil (created The 1st Baron Burghley in 1571), the Lord High Treasurer, describing it as "the largest and strongest fortress in all Ireland", adding:

    "it is the greatest I ever saw in an Irishman's hands: and would appear to be in good keeping; one of the fairest situated in good soil and so nigh a portable water a boat of ten tonnes could come within ten yards of it"

    In 1607, after the Nine Years' War the leaders of the O'Donnell clan left Ireland in the Flight of the Earls. In 1611, during the Plantation of Ulster, the castle and its lands were granted to an English Captain, Basil Brooke. The tower house was severely damaged by the departing O'Donnells to prevent the castle being used against the Gaelic clans but was quickly restored by its new owners. Brooke also added windows, a gable and a large manor-house wing to the keep, all in the Jacobean style.

    The Brooke family owned the castle up until the 1670s, when they moved to near Lisnaskea in County Fermanagh. At that time, in the 1670s, the Brookes sold the castle to the Gore dynasty, who later became Earls of Arran in the Peerage of Ireland. The castle fell into a ruinous state under the Gores in the early 18th century. In 1898, the then owner, The 5th Earl of Arran, vested the castle in the care of The Office of Public Works.

    Restoration
    In the early 1990s, the castle was partially restored by The Office of Public Works (The O.P.W.). The towerhouse has had new roofing and flooring added, in keeping with the original styles and techniques used in the 15th and 17th centuries. The stonework has been restored and the manor wing has been partially roofed. Some of the oak timbers used came from the Colebrooke Estate, just outside Brookeborough in County Fermanagh. Parts of the exterior of the tower house have been harled. The castle is now open to the public and often hosts events such as Gaelic cultural evenings or Ulster Scots events.



    County Donegal
    County Donegal ( Irish: Contae Dhún na nGall) is a county of Ireland in the province of Ulster. It has also been known as County Tyrconnell (Tír Chonaill, meaning 'Land of Conall'), after the historic territory of the same name, on which it was based. Donegal County Council is the local council and Lifford the county town.



    [donegal country coat of arms]

    At various times in its history, it has been known as County Tirconaill, County Tirconnell or County Tyrconnell (Irish: Tír Chonaill). The former was used as its official name during 1922–1927. This is in reference to both the old túath of Tír Chonaill and the earldom that succeeded it.

    County Donegal was the home of the once mighty Clann Dálaigh, whose best known branch were the Clann Ó Domhnaill, better known in English as the O'Donnell dynasty. Until around 1600, the O'Donnells were one of Ireland's richest and most powerful native Irish ruling families. Within Ulster, only the Uí Néill (known in English as the O'Neill Clan) of modern County Tyrone were more powerful. The O'Donnells were Ulster's second most powerful clan or ruling-family from the early 13th century through to the start of the 17th century. For several centuries the O'Donnells ruled Tír Chonaill, a Gaelic kingdom in West Ulster that covered almost all of modern County Donegal. The head of the O'Donnell family had the titles An Ó Domhnaill (meaning The O'Donnell in English) and Rí Thír Chonaill (meaning King of Tír Chonaill in English). Based at Donegal Castle in Dún na nGall (modern Donegal), the O'Donnell Kings of Tír Chonaill were traditionally inaugurated at Doon Rock near Kilmacrennan. O'Donnell royal or chiefly power was finally ended in what was then the newly created County Donegal in September 1607, following the Flight of the Earls from near Rathmullan. The modern County Arms of Donegal (dating from the early 1970s) was influenced by the design of the old O'Donnell royal arms. The County Arms is the official coat of arms of both County Donegal and Donegal County Council.

    The modern County Donegal was shired by order of the English Crown in 1585. The English authorities at Dublin Castle formed the new county by amalgamating the old Kingdom of Tír Chonaill with the old Lordship of Inishowen. However, although detachments of the Royal Irish Army were stationed there, the Dublin authorities were unable to establish control over Tír Chonaill and Inishowen until after the Battle of Kinsale in 1602. Full control over the new County Donegall was only achieved after the Flight of the Earls in September 1607. It was the centre of O'Doherty's Rebellion of 1608 with the key Battle of Kilmacrennan taking place there. The county was one of those 'planted' during the Plantation of Ulster from around 1610 onwards. What became the City of Derry was officially part of County Donegal up until 1610.

    County Donegal was one of the worst affected parts of Ulster during the Great Famine of the late 1840s in Ireland. Vast swathes of the county were devastated by this catastrophe, many areas becoming permanently depopulated. Vast numbers of County Donegal's people emigrated at this time, chiefly through Foyle Port.


    O'Donnell dynasty
    The O'Donnell dynasty (Irish: Ó Dónaill or Ó Domhnaill, Ó Doṁnaill or Ua Domaill; derived from the Irish name Domhnall, which means "descendant of Dónal") were the dominant Irish clan of the kingdom of Tyrconnell, Ulster, in medieval and early-modern Ireland.

    Like the family of O'Neill, that of O'Donnell of Tyrconnell was of the Uí Néill, i.e. descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, High King of Ireland at the beginning of the 5th century; the O'Neill, or Cenél nEógain, tracing their pedigree to Eógan mac Néill, and the O'Donnells, or Cenél Conaill, to Conall Gulban, both sons of Niall. Conall was baptised by St. Patrick.

    Arms and motto
    The Roman Emperor Constantine the Great converted to Christianity after a vision before the famous Battle of the Milvian Bridge, having seen a chi-rho in the sky, and thence the motto In Hoc Signo Vinces, telling him he would be victorious with the sign of the cross. The chi-rho was adopted on a banner, the labarum, upheld on a vexillum, which resembled a Christian cross, and in time the motto became associated with the Cross all over Europe. Legend has it that St. Patrick struck the shield of Conall, son of King Niall of the Nine Hostages, with his crosier, called Bachall Iosa (the staff of Jesus) inscribing thereon a sign of the cross and told him the same, and baptized him. According to the Life and Acts of Saint Patrick (chapter 138), commissioned by Sir John de Courcy and written by Jocelyn of Furness (c. 1185 AD), St. Patrick took his staff, known as the staff of Jesus, or Bacall Iosa, and struck the shield of Prince Conall, rendering a sign of the Cross on it, “et mox cum baculo suo, qui baculus Jesu dicebatur Crucis signum ejus scuto impressit, asserens neminem de stirpe ejus in bello vincendum qui signum illud”, and thus indicating that he and his offspring would henceforth be victorious in battle if they followed that sign This legend is also described several centuries later in the Lebhar Inghine i Dhomhnaill. His land became Tír Chonaill, Tyrconnell, the land of Conall.

    Conall's Constantinian shield, and this motto, have been the main O’Donnell arms in various forms, through the centuries. The motto also appears prominently placed as a motto on a ribbon unfurled with a passion cross to its left, beneath a window over the Scala Regia, adjacent to Bernini's equestrian statue of Emperor Constantine, in the Vatican. Emperors and other monarchs, having paid respects to the Pope, descended the Scala Regia, and would observe the light shining down through the window, with the motto, reminiscent of Constantine's vision, and be reminded to follow the Cross. They would thence turn right into the atrium of St. Peter's Basilica, ostensibly so inspired. In an earlier version (before Bernini's renovations in the mid-17th century), something similar may have resonated with and been observed by Prince Rory O'Donnell, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell following his visit to Pope Paul V (at the Palazzo Quirinale) in Rome, just prior to his death in 1608. It would certainly have resonated with and been observed by Cardinal Patrick O'Donnell.


    Territory
    Tyrconnell, the territory named after the Cenel Conaill, is the vast territory where the O'Donnells held sway, comprised the greater part of the modern county of Donegal except the peninsula of Inishowen. But it also included areas outside Donegal, such as the baronies of Carbury in County Sligo, Rosclogher in County Leitrim, and Magheraboy and Firlurg in County Fermanagh, and part of southern County Londonderry, hence it straddled the modern Republic of Ireland and also part of Northern Ireland in the UK. The jewel in the O'Donnell crown was Donegal Castle, one of seven O'Donnell castles, and now a national monument partially restored by the Office of Public Works.[citation needed] Tyrconnell also therefore bordered on territory ruled by the O'Neills of Tyrone, who were periodically attempting to assert their claim of supremacy over it, and hence the history of the O'Donnells is for the most part a record of clan warfare with their powerful neighbours, and of their own efforts to make good their claims to the overlordship of northern Connacht, and a wider swathe of Ulster. Nonetheless Tyrconnell existed for a period as an independent kingdom, recognised by King Henry III of England.


    Ascendancy
    Gofraidh Ó Domhnaill, the first chieftain, was son of Domhnall Mór Ó Domhnaill. In 1257, Gofraidh was victorious when he went to battle at Creadran-Cille against Brian Ua Néill. Upon Gofraidh's death, subsequent to wounds incurred during battle against Ó Néill,[citation needed] he was succeeded in the chieftainship by his brother Domhnall Óg, who returned from Scotland in time to withstand successfully the demands of Ó Néill. Over time, the O'Donnell King of Tyrconnell became known as the Fisher-King, on the Continent, ostensibly due to the export of fish traded for wine in La Rochelle.

    In the early 14th century A.D., the O'Donnell rulers aided Templar knights fleeing via Sligo and Tyrconnell to Scotland where a Templar priory existed at Ballymote , a Percival family estate for the last 300 years.

    The O’Donnell rulers of Tyrconnell are also noted for having in the late 12th century given sanctuary to the Donlevy dynasty of Ulaid (Ulster), after their kingdom had fallen to John de Courcy in 1177. It is in Tyrconnell that a branch of the Donlevy's became known as the MacNulty's, deriving from the Irish Mac an Ultaigh, meaning "son of the Ulsterman", in reference to their former kingdom of Ulaid. During the Donlevy exile in Tyrconnell, The O’Donnell gave them the high Gaelic status of “ollahm leighis” or his official physicians.

    It was in fact two of these deposed MacDonlevy (> MacNulty) royals and Roman Catholic priests thereto exiled in Tyrconnell, Fathers Muiris Ulltach in full Muiris mac Donnchadh Ulltach Ó Duinnshléibhe and Muiris Ulltach in full Muiris mac Seaán Ulltach Ó Duinnshléibhe, who both along with the Archbishop of Tuam attended Hugh Roe O'Donnell (aka Red Hugh O’Donnell), The O'Donnell of 1601 Kinsale fame, in his exile at his death bed at Simancas Castle in Spain in 1602. And, it was in turn an Irish Count O’Donnell, who compassionately married the widow (d. 1708) of Don-Levi, a Jacobite (Jacobitism) and, thereby, on James II of England's and his French allied's failure to reclaim his British crowns, the last The MacDonlevy to sit in Ireland (departed 1691), after this prince died in exile with the Stuarts in France at the Archbishopric of Treves. This union of the MacDonlevy and the O'Donnell, though, bore no issue.

    In absence of these indulgences of the O’Donnell dynasty kings having maintained the MacDonlevy and MacNulty physicians as a dignified community, it is debatable whether they could have so influenced the course of western medicine, educating and training Niall Ó Glacáin (L. Nellanus Glacanus) in the medical arts, so he could later on the Continent apply empirical method to pioneer the field of forensic anatomy and pathology, first describe the petechial haemorrhages of the lung and swelling of the spleen incident of bubonic plague (Tractatus de Peste, 1629), and early elucidate the empirical method of differential diagnosis for the continental European medical community, and producing the medieval physician and medical scholar Cormac MacDonlevy translator from Latin to vernacular of Bernard de Gordon's Lilium Medicine, Gaulteris Agilon's De dosibus and Gui de Chuliac's Chirurgia.

    Later in the early 13th century, the O’Donnell also gave succor to the Ó Cléirigh kings of Uí Fiachrach Aidhne. Onara Ultach was descended of the MacDonlevy (dynasty) royals of Ulidia (kingdom), who as above noted after the fall of that Ulster kingdom to the Anglo-Norman forces of Henry Plantagenet served as ollam lieghis or the official physicians to the O'Donnell kings of Tyrconnell. Onara married Donnchadh Ó Cléirigh, a son of the Chief of the name of the Ó Cléirigh family then also of Tyconnell. The Ó Cléirigh were too a learned Irish royal family that had lost their sub-kingdom in Uí Fiachrach Aidhne in what is today County Galway to the Anglo-Norman forces of Henry Plantagenet. The Ó Cléirigh then went into service of the O’Donnell as poet historians, scribes and secretaries or official bards, called in Irish language "ollam righ". Onara bore for Donnchadh a son Mícheál Ó Cléirigh (c. 1590 – 1643), anglicized Michael O’Cleary, who matured to become the principal author of the Annals of the Four Masters. But for the manifold grace of the O’Donnell, this union would never have occurred, and Michael O’Cleary never lived to memorialize this history of Gaelic Ireland.


    Later struggles and diaspora
    The O'Donnells defeated the O'Neills in the 1522 Battle of Knockavoe. In 1541 Manus O'Donnell took part in the "Surrender and regrant" process. In 1567 the O'Donnells won the Battle of Farsetmore against the O'Neills, reconfirming their autonomy in Ulster.

    During the Nine Years' War of 1594-1603, the O'Donnells of Tyrconnell played a leading part, led by the famous Prince Red Hugh O'Donnell. Under his leadership, and that of his ally Hugh O'Neill, they advanced to Kinsale and laid siege to the English forces in anticipation of a Spanish invasion. En route, they implanted some O'Donnell kinsmen in Ardfert and Lixnaw to protect the territories of their ally, FitzMaurice, Lord of Kerry. The Battle of Kinsale was lost in 1601, heralding the end of the Gaelic order and Brehon Laws in Ireland, and the completion of the Elizabethan conquest. Following the Treaty of Mellifont of 1603 the new King James I pardoned Rory O'Donnell and created him Earl of Tyrconnell in the Irish peerage.

    Rory then joined in the Flight of the Earls in 1607, which led to the title becoming attainted in 1614, and Tyrconnell and Ulster being colonised in the Plantation of Ulster.He died in exile in Rome on 28 July 1608.

    Rory O'Donnell's son Hugh, who lived at the Spanish Court, assumed the title of earl (even though the Irish Parliamnet had attainted the title); and the last titular earl of Tyrconnel was this Hugh's son Hugh Albert, who died without heirs in 1642, and who by his will appointed Hugh Balldearg O'Donnell his heir, thus restoring the chieftainship to the elder branch of the family. To a still elder branch belonged Daniel O'Donnell (1666–1735), a general of the Irish Brigade in the French service, whose father, Turlough, was a son of Hugh Duff O'Donnell, brother of Manus, son of an earlier Hugh Duff. Daniel served in the French army in the wars of the period, fighting against Duke of Marlborough at the battles of Oudenarde and Malplaquet at the head of an O'Donnell regiment.
    Last edited by paladinbob123; November 07, 2020 at 11:12 AM.
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  15. #1395
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby of TWC
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    England



    "This shows again what a fool he truly is!" Jasper exclaimed. The Lewes brother was pacing in their tent as he was wont to do these days. "I mean, marching out on his own with no back-up or anything." Sounds like something we would do Paul de Sandy thought but wisely kept his thoughts to himself. It was not useful getting Jasper angry at him so Paul just simply sipped from his drink while his friend raved on. To be honest de Sandy had been suprised to hear of Anselm's sally towards Caenarvon. Paul had taken the Lord Protector for too much of a coward to face the Irish head-on. Something must've drawn him out. How strange to be here at Pembroke Castle once again. Not so long ago Paul had stood here with the very same men ready to capture the fortress for the English Crown. It had been here where the Welsh War had been ended and now he was here to defend them. Strange how fate worked Paul pondered while taking another sip from his cup of spiced wine. "Are you even listening Paul?" Jasper was looking at him with that dangerous fire in his eyes. de Sandy knew how to handle this. "You know I am Jasper, relax. If anything, Anselm's defeat is a good thing for our cause. Every day Anselm is losing bit by bit the support of the nobility. Noone likes a Lord PROTECTOR who can't PROTECT anything." Jasper calmed down a bit. Paul rose and put his hands on Jasper's shoulders. "We'll just have to be a bit more patient. If the Irish don't get him then I'm sure the famed Waylander will get him." Jasper sighed on grabbed a chair to sit on, Paul smiled and called some servants to refill their cups. With another steaming cup of spiced wine de Sandy sat back down raising his glass as if in a toast. "Until then we enjoy the comforts of life."

    Ireland up: http://www.mediafire.com/file/7lz2vw...d_104.sav/file

    Chapter XXIX: Aldburg
    #JusticeForAkar #JusticeForCal #JusticeForCookie #JusticeForAthelchan



  16. #1396

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    @ England: Good writing, but hasn't Anselm already been inaugurated as king?

  17. #1397
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Sick Baby of TWC
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    In-game he might be called King but for RP reasons he remains Lord Protector. Ever since King Geiles died, the leader of England has been a Lord Protector in wait for Geiles' young son to come of age and take the throne. Then the young son died of the plague ending the line of kings, leaving the Crown without a clear heir. Anselm keeps the title of Lord Protector for he believes he can't claim kingship, at least not yet. Should the Irish invasion be a victory for England and Anselm personally, things might change in that department. In the end he rules and acts as King of England though he doesn't take the title of King.

    Chapter XXIX: Aldburg
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  18. #1398

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Ireland again. Any news from the front? new player?
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  19. #1399
    zender9's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Wales up:
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen..._wales_104.sav

    Irish sailors proved their worth and fame once again! The rumours were true about the English navy sailing to Irish Sea from the south. Admiral Morwich and Admiral Conlaed together confronted English navy and defeated them. Gun Holks are far superior to simple cogs.
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...71372032/1.jpg
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...39032842/2.jpg
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...22791700/3.jpg
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...77083136/4.jpg


    Meanwhile in Wales, invasion and battles were continuing. High King Lochlainn chased down the Lord Protector Anselm. Anselm's routed and broken army couldn't put much of a defensive line. With the help of newly arrived raiding party, High King Lochlainn claimed another victory against Anselm. Yet, Anselm managed to escape to safety. What a shameful act, fleeing from battle twice when his soldiers are dying. Anselm isn't capable of protecting anyone.
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...86071336/5.jpg

    In the following days, weather conditions became really harsh. It was snowing day and night. English were camping nearby Pembroke. Everyone was waiting for the snow to stop, except one man, Prince Noah. He always liked the cold weather. Being a man who got promoted after a military career, he knew his soldiers well. These soldiers survived harsh conditions of plague he thought and they really like drinking. Irish forces weren't in high numbers, but they were all hardy warriors capable of killing many enemies. So, Noah came up with a crazy plan. He was going to lead his slightly over a thousand men to English camp in the snowy night, and make a successful assault. No one would expect an attack at this conditions, and he trusted element of surprise. And to his men. After sailing north of Pembroke, they marched to south. Everyone drank to get warm enough, then in the midst of the night, Irish soldiers charged to English camps like berserkers.
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...63578368/6.jpg
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...10958908/7.jpg
    English soldiers were surprised and many slained before they can get to their swords. In the morning counting the deads, Noah estimated 1:5 loses in favour of Ireland. The very successful assault also brought the sun back. It wasn't snowing anymore. Pembroke garrison shut down the gates and started waiting for help to arrive.

    Once the news of victory reached to Lochlainn, it made him happy, but he thought if the war continues like this, he will lose his all army. So he decided to send a message to King Vortipor asking him to switch his allegiances to him since the English threat is over and Welsh lands are more or less liberated. Although he wanted to conquer Welsh lands for himself, the plague is still not over. Fighting English and leaving Wales to Welsh could end up more profitable.

  20. #1400

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Scotland up: http://www.mediafire.com/file/cqp02i...d_104.sav/file

    New recruits were trained by the day as a combined English and Welsh resistance whittled away Irish forces. King Vortiper faithfully sent Rhydderch Mareddd forth to meet the Irish prince Noah in battle where the English had failed. It appeared the descendants of the once hero of Wales and his brother had come of age, but accordingly foul rumours accumulated about their persons... It seemed warrior's blood ran strong in them, but recently the Welsh king's coffers had been mysteriously lighter than usual as tensions rose between the Welsh nobility and Irish invaders closed in...

    "J-Jasper Lewes?!" exclaimed Prince Gronwr as his detachment of men was interrupted on their way to England... Gromwr quickly hid his mistrust under an opening gesture and a smile. He had thought perhaps England had suspected treachery on the part of Wales and sent a legion of men to simply eradicate them, or perhaps, Jasper Lewes had finally thought better of serving the English... However upon surveying the landscape, Gromwr saw a beaten and defeated army, and a hastily set up and understaffed camp on the other side of the river. "I seek refuge in England." Gromwr addressed the two men, Lewes and Sandy. "It's inevitable that the Irish will prevail. Our King will be slain and I am the next in line for the throne. I cannot afford to die so wastefully. I need the protection of England, and to muster our forces for a counterattack." "The Irish are still strong, but at the current rate they will not be able to hold their gains." Rather than sally through a camp of potentially diseased men, Gromwr set up camp in the nearby wilderness and waited for the army to make leave, and then make his way to the protection of English lands...

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