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Thread: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

  1. #1081

  2. #1082

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)


    with three assassinations...means you have 3 assassins , and therefore 20 regions? is this true?



    . A faction with 10 regions would have two assassins, a faction with 20 regions 3 assassins, and so on.



    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  3. #1083
    zender9's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Well, I played my turn before seeing paladinbob's reply, if Ireland is going to replay and get the extra assassin killed, I'm ok to replay my turn. But anyway posting the turn.

    Scotland up:
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...cotland_75.sav

    Fort taken back:
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...5-08-07-23.jpg

  4. #1084

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by paladinbob123 View Post
    with three assassinations...means you have 3 assassins , and therefore 20 regions? is this true?



    . A faction with 10 regions would have two assassins, a faction with 20 regions 3 assassins, and so on.



    I am sure Ireland doesn't have 20 regions so 3 assassins is not possible.
    I will wait for Peaman to react before I play my turn.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  5. #1085

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    i want to try is it a large variety of unit?

  6. #1086

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by arnokest13 View Post
    i want to try is it a large variety of unit?
    ??

    PM reminder sent to Peaman.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  7. #1087
    PeaMan's Avatar Centenarius
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Best to PM/post on my page if there's an issue so I know to look.

    I only have enough settlements for 2 assassins, have the admin impose a fine and destroy the extra. I cba to write the messages again or to replay the turn.



    My Modding work.. - Game of Thrones

  8. #1088

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    No need for a fine, it happens. Just eliminate the extra assassin and replay. This is my opinion at least, the decision is the admin's.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  9. #1089

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    happy not for a fine at this point , just for Pman to rein back his extra assassin [kill him off or something?]
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  10. #1090

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    it has been 10 days since a turn ..so i suggest scotland go ahead and do his turn , and we just ask ireland to remove one of his assasin [buy killing him off] when his turn comes around and continue ?
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  11. #1091

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    I don't mind at all, but perhaps England would like to have his illegaly murdered spy back?
    Peaman, why didn't you replay your turn yet anyway?
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  12. #1092
    Turkafinwë's Avatar Cheerful Nihilist
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Quote Originally Posted by Der Böse Wolf View Post
    I don't mind at all, but perhaps England would like to have his illegaly murdered spy back?
    Peaman, why didn't you replay your turn yet anyway?
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaMan View Post
    Best to PM/post on my page if there's an issue so I know to look.

    I only have enough settlements for 2 assassins, have the admin impose a fine and destroy the extra. I cba to write the messages again or to replay the turn.
    By virtue of his statement here he couldn't be arsed (cba) to do it. As for the assassinated spy, it's not such a big deal to halt the campaign for so I would say Der Böse Wolf you go ahead and play your turn. I don't know how penalising works in this game, if you need a specific save or anything. I'll send a PM to the admin and he can give PeaMan the fine and delete said assassin right before my turn comes up. That way you and paladinbob can play your turns just fine.

    EDIT: you know what I can't be arsed to ask the admins to impose anything for something so trivial. Let's just play the game and as long as PeaMan doesn't use his extra assassin I'll be happy to continue.
    Last edited by Turkafinwë; December 09, 2019 at 10:28 AM.

  13. #1093

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Oh I didn't pay attention to the part in red.

    Well then I will play my turn ASAP.

    Thanks.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  14. #1094

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    At the Clansmen Assembly in Perth...
    ----------------------------------------

    "Sire, the Irish are sending hordes of men to the mainland.
    Their King asks you to let the Welsh have the Crown's lands and to give those we conquer to our vassals, the Scottish Shires.
    And let's not forget that those same Irish simply walked into Lancaster after all the bloody battles we fought there and in Carlisle to dispose of Henry.
    And when the Shires requested Lancaster be given to us, the Irish refused and kept the fortress..."


    The MacDougall Chieftain finished his speech, panting with adrenaline...

    "If I may add, Sire, that the Irish nobles have publicly shown envy and hostility towards our latest expansion in the South. They sat on their island idle after having signed a truce with the Crown at the moment when we needed them the most, fighting both the Crown and the Shires. And when we prevailed, they pointed fingers at us accusing us of being greedy expansionists..."

    Chieftain MacCormick was equally outraged.

    "This massive Irish military move is not looking good. They say this is a war of liberation, not a war to replace a tyrant by another.
    They are calling you a tyrant and they are landing troops to make sure you don't conquer England...this is a not a friendly move Sire!"


    The MacMahon clan also sided with the others.

    Alexander stood from his throne and stated walking in the hall, looking the chieftains in the eye as we strolled past them.
    He then returned to his place, took his wine cup, took a sip and suddenly threw it on the ground.

    "You are asking me to commit TREASON??" The king shouted in a fit of rage.

    But the clansmen were not impressed.

    "You call it what you want. It is self-preservation. We did not sacrifice for years to drive off the Norsemen, only to be bullied by Irishmen, many of whom have Norse blood in them.
    The Irish themselves betrayed the Vikings back in the years after King Magnus refused to conquer them at the request of England and his father.
    Magnus stood by them only to be betrayed.
    It was to our benefit of course, but if they betrayed him back then, they will betray us tomorrow."


    MacDougall stood defiantly. This was the clan of the dishonoured Prince and were opposing Alexander firmly.

    "I united the Clans under one banner after pushing the Norseman away, I vassalised the Scottish Shires and led you so far South where no Scostman has ever been. How dare you question my authority??


    Alexander's face turned red with anger.

    "We are are not questioning your authority, Great King. We are all forever indebted to your acts of valour and service to Scotland.
    But we are also not blinded nor binded by treaties.
    We can read through the lines and have come to the conclusion that the Irish are playing a dangerous game."

    MacMahon, the oldest clanleader tried to appease the tension.

    Alexander sat down heavily in his chair.
    "Let me think this overnight. Tomorrow we talk again."

    "Tomorrow",
    the clansmen said.


    -----


    At the port of Dumfries...

    -----------------------------

    "Set sail!!! Burn their fleet!!"
    The Scottish navy, having sat idle for a long time, sailed south to intercept them.

    The Irish, not aware of the recent turn of events, were transporting a huge army with just a couple of ships, not fearing any attacks in the Irish sea, where only ships of the Celtic Alliance are roaming.

    It was a disaster. The Irish allowed the Scottish ships to get so close, seeing them as a probable escort.
    But the Scotsmen were all but an escort.

    The council of Clansmen had decided for a pre-emptive strike.
    Alexander had reluctantly approved, fearing that if he did not accept, he would lose the support of the clans.

    A whole Irish army was sent to the bottom of the sea without even understanding why...






    ----

    The Scottish Shires next: http://www.mediafire.com/file/u6cchk...ns_75.sav/file
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

    Current Hotseat:
    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  15. #1095

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)



    Duke Godwine read the remit from the scottish messenger telling the Scottish shires duke of the scottish decision to attack the irish , and the duke grimaced at the news, knowing that it would bring more conflict at a time when the scottish were but a hairs breath away from total domination. Angry now ,after throwing his lot in with the scottish, he knew that he would have to make a effort and as well as helping funding somewhat of the scottish war cost, he would have to bring his own forces to fore. But it would take time , to raise the militia forces, probably around five or six seasons to raise the troops required to make a difference.

    He stopped one of his many generals and reminded him to start training some of the peasants and town militia in the ofttimes from the farming and harvesting, to give them training and simple maneuvers drill for possible recruitment in the winter, as the population of newcastle and york became tentatively to recruit more men for the brewing conflict. In newcastle itself , he designated his forces, the Newcastle blue coats and began to give them new uniforms to best represent their change from the red of england to the blue of scotland.


    -------------------------------------

    The rebels of the old northern shires were not done apparently , broken perhaps , weak certainly but not done , and as the son of lewis the protector , Godwine lewis found , with renewed faith , he gathered some of the outlaws of sherwood forest , and marched upon the now empty connisbough castle , which the welsh-scottish alliance had agreed to leave for the forces of the scottish shires. Acting quickly he bluffed his way past the skeleton garrison relieving them , only to have his outlaws now take over the castle once again , to again use it for a base of their operations.

    Meanwhile the rest of the rebel leaders, were still alive , abet with minimum forces, and capturing a ship from the scottish shires, they sailed it south towards norwich and east anglia to once again , take refuge with the english crowns estate with a small hope of regaining a small force to keep the dream alive.

    Sarah cornwall moved past the captured city of Nottingham , racing ever southwards looking for a gallant english lord and general for marriage , again hoping for revenge for her family against the current duke godwine of newcastle .

    The ambassador that acted for the northern shires rebels was given funds again , as the northern shires had a castle [and therefore estates] to work with, and with some new funding , [and a sizable pouch] he managed to bribe the welsh diplomat over to their side to help raise more funding for the rebellion.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ---------------------------

    waylander moved from the serving table , wearing the clothing of a minor english servant, he gave the welsh lord , William Blegywyryd , the goblet with the fatal poison within , before moving off and serving several other prominent welsh notable personages before , moving off seemingly to get another wine flask . Entering the kitchen he rapidly moved down into the cellar, changing back into a welsh guardsman uniform [he had "secured" before] before reemerging and exiting the kitchen , appearing just another welsh guard doing a routine patrol. It was only when he departed the main gate, to Nottingham castle nodding to the welsh guardsmen at the gates, before he disappeared into the city never to be seen again , as he heard at the edge of his hearing , of the alarm of guard within the castle, as the deadly brew had done its work and waylander the slayer had claimed another life.

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    Turn to England
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/yv716jxckx...nd_76.sav?dl=0

    --------------------------

    Woodcroft Castle



    [i picked this as the location of the castle was basically peterborough [which did have one but minor with no pics so i picked woodcroft as the nearest]

    Woodcroft Castle was built at the end of the 13th century near the city of Peterborough in the Soke of Peterborough (now in Cambridgeshire). The medieval portions of the castle today include the front range, the circular tower, and the gatehouse. There is debate as to whether the castle originally followed a normal Edwardian quadrilateral design, of which most has since been lost, or if it was simply never fully completed. Early Tudor additions (late 1400s) retained these medieval elements into the current design.

    Woodcroft Castle was held by the Royalists during the English Civil War and was successfully besieged and taken by Parliamentary forces in 1648. Dr Michael Hudson, commander of the Royalist garrison, was killed 6 June 1648 at the end of the siege.

    The castle is a Grade II* listed building and the 18th-century barn and stable range is Grade II. Today, the castle is a private dwelling.











    Peterborough [included because of its proximity to woodcroft castle]





    The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.


    Present-day Peterborough is the latest in a series of settlements which have at one time or other benefited from its site where the Nene leaves large areas of permanently drained land for the fens. Remains of Bronze Age settlement and what is thought to be religious activity can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the city centre. The Romans established a fortified garrison town at Durobrivae on Ermine Street, five miles (8 km) to the west in Water Newton, around the middle of the 1st century AD. Durobrivae's earliest appearance among surviving records is in the Antonine Itinerary of the late 2nd century. There was also a large 1st century Roman fort at Longthorpe, designed to house half a legion, or about 3,000 soldiers; it may have been established as early as around AD 44–48. Peterborough was an important area of ceramic production in the Roman period, providing Nene Valley Ware that was traded as far away as Cornwall and the Antonine Wall, Caledonia.




    Peterborough is shown by its original name Medeshamstede to have possibly been an Anglian settlement before AD 655, when Sexwulf founded a monastery on land granted to him for that purpose by Peada of Mercia, who converted to Christianity and was briefly ruler of the smaller Middle Angles sub-group. His brother Wulfhere murdered his own sons, similarly converted and then finished the monastery by way of atonement.

    Hereward the Wake [more on him later] rampaged through the town in 1069 or 1070. Outraged, Abbot Turold erected a fort or castle, which, from his name, was called Mont Turold: this mound, or hill, is on the outside of the deanery garden, now called Tout Hill, although in 1848 Tot-hill or Toot Hill. The abbey church was rebuilt and greatly enlarged in the 12th century. The Peterborough Chronicle, a version of the Anglo-Saxon one, contains unique information about the history of England after the Norman conquest, written here by monks in the 12th century. This is the only known prose history in English between the conquest and the later 14th century. The burgesses received their first charter from "Abbot Robert" – probably Robert of Sutton (1262–1273). The place suffered materially in the war between King John and the confederate barons, many of whom took refuge in the monastery here and in Crowland Abbey, from which sanctuaries they were forced by the king's soldiers, who plundered the religious houses and carried off great treasures. The abbey church became one of Henry VIII's retained, more secular, cathedrals in 1541, having been assessed at the Dissolution (in the King's Books)[clarification needed] as having revenue of £1,972.7s.0¾d per annum.

    The Bridge Fair, as it is now known, granted to the abbey by King Henry VI, survives with prayers for the opening of the fair were once said at the morning service in the cathedral, followed by a civic proclamation and a sausage lunch at the town hall which still takes place. The mayor traditionally leads a procession from the town hall to the fair where the proclamation is read, asking all persons to "behave soberly and civilly, and to pay their just dues and demands according to the laws of the realm and the rights of the City of Peterborough".

    The general layout of Peterborough is attributed to Martin de Vecti who, as abbot from 1133 to 1155, rebuilt the settlement on dry limestone to the west of the monastery, rather than the often-flooded marshlands to the east. Abbot Martin was responsible for laying out the market place and the wharf beside the river. Peterborough's 17th-century Guildhall was built in 1671 by John Lovin, who also restored the bishop's palace shortly after the restoration of King Charles II. It stands on columns, providing an open ground floor for the butter and poultry markets which used to be held there. The Market Place was renamed Cathedral Square and the adjacent Gates Memorial Fountain moved to Bishop's Road Gardens in 1963, when the (then weekly) market was transferred to the site of the old cattle market
    .

    Peterborough castle


    Peterborough Castle, also known as Mount Thorold and Touthill, was a medieval motte and bailey castle in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England.
    Peterborough Castle was built by Abbot Thorold of Peterborough, a Norman appointed to the post by William the Conqueror. A motte and bailey design was erected close to the cathedral, in what is now the Dean's garden.Thorold built the castle to protect himself against the monks in the cathedral, during the turbulent post-conquest period. The castle was destroyed by the 12th century abbot, Martin de Bec.

    Today only the motte survives of the castle and is now between ten and twelve metres high. The castle has scheduled monument status


    Rockingham forest


    The forest was named after the village of Rockingham, where the castle was a royal retreat. The boundaries were marked by the River Nene on the eastern side and on the western side what is now the A508 road from Market Harborough to Northampton. Over the years the forest shrank, and today only a patchwork of the north-eastern forest remains. The bulk of the remaining forest is located within a square, of which the corners are Corby, Kettering, Thrapston and Oundle.

    The area became a royal hunting ground for King William I after the Norman conquest. The term forest represented an area of legal jurisdiction and remained so until the 19th century.

    A Cistercian abbey was established in 1143 which became known as Pipewell Abbey. In 1298 the de Lacys were granted permission to inclose 30 acres (12 ha) pertaining to the manor of Wadenhoe, lying within the forest, in order to make a park. The forest boundaries were set in 1299, although the boundaries returned to a smaller area as a result of King Charles I's actions. King Charles II took little interest in the forest and gave away or sold much of it. By 1792 there was no significant royal ownership of the forest area. Parliamentary enclosure of the bailiwicks and disafforestation of Rockingham bailiwick in 1832 resulted in a much smaller forest area with much of the land turned over to agriculture. The Forestry Commission took over the remnants of public woodland in 1923. The forest originally stretched from Stamford down to Northampton.


    Peterborough Cathedral






    Peterborough Cathedral, properly the Cathedral Church of St Peter, St Paul and St Andrew – also known as Saint Peter's Cathedral in the United Kingdom – is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Peterborough, dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, whose statues look down from the three high gables of the famous West Front.


    The original church, known as "Medeshamstede", was founded in the reign of the Anglo-Saxon King Peada of the Middle Angles in about 655 AD, as one of the first centres of Christianity in central England.The monastic settlement with which the church was associated lasted at least until 870, when it was supposedly destroyed by Vikings. In an alcove of the New Building, an extension of the eastern end, lies an ancient stone carving: the Hedda Stone. This medieval carving of 12 monks, six on each side, commemorates the destruction of the Monastery and the death of the Abbot and Monks when the area was sacked by the Vikings in 864. The Hedda Stone was likely carved sometime after the raid, when the monastery slipped into decline.

    In the mid-10th century monastic revival (in which churches at Ely and Ramsey were also refounded) a Benedictine Abbey was created and endowed in 966, principally by Athelwold, Bishop of Winchester, from what remained of the earlier church, with "a basilica [church] there furbished with suitable structures of halls, and enriched with surrounding lands" and more extensive buildings which saw the aisle built out to the west with a second tower added. The original central tower was, however, retained. It was dedicated to St Peter and surrounded by a palisade, called a burgh, hence the town surrounding the abbey was eventually named Peter-burgh. The community was further revived in 972 by Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury.




    This newer church had as its major focal point a substantial western tower with a "Rhenish helm" and was largely constructed of ashlars. Only a small section of the foundations of the Anglo-Saxon church remain beneath the south transept but there are several significant artefacts, including Anglo-Saxon carvings such as the Hedda Stone, from the earlier building.

    In 2008, Anglo-Saxon grave markers were reported to have been found by workmen repairing a wall in the cathedral precincts. The grave markers are said to date to the 11th century, and probably belonged to "townsfolk".

    Although damaged during the struggle between the Norman invaders and local folk-hero, Hereward the Wake, it was repaired and continued to thrive until destroyed by an accidental fire in 1116. This event necessitated the building of a new church in the Norman style, begun by Abbot John de Sais on 8 March 1118 By 1193, the building was completed to the western end of the Nave, including the central tower and the decorated wooden ceiling of the nave. The ceiling, completed between 1230 and 1250, still survives. It is unique in Britain and one of only four such ceilings in the whole of Europe. It has been over-painted twice, once in 1745, then in 1834, but still retains the character and style of the original. (The painted nave ceiling of Ely Cathedral, by contrast, is entirely a Victorian creation.)

    The church was largely built of Barnack limestone from quarries on its own land, and it was paid annually for access to these quarries by the builders of Ely Cathedral and Ramsey Abbey in thousands of eels (e.g. 4,000 each year by Ramsey). Cathedral historians believe that part of the placing of the church in the location it is in is due to the easy ability to transfer quarried stones by river and then to the existing site allowing it to grow without being relocated.


    Hereward the Wake







    Hereward the Wake (c. 1035 – c. 1072), (also known as Hereward the Outlaw or Hereward the Exile), was an Anglo-Saxon nobleman and a leader of local resistance to the Norman Conquest of England. His base, when leading the rebellion against the Norman rulers, was the Isle of Ely in East Anglia. According to legend he roamed the Fens, covering North Cambridgeshire, Southern Lincolnshire and West Norfolk, leading popular opposition to William the Conqueror.

    Hereward is an Old English name, composed of the elements here, "army" and ward "guard" (cognate with the Old High German name Heriwart). The epithet "the Wake" is recorded in the late 14th century and may mean "the watchful", or derive from the Anglo-Norman Wake family who later claimed descent from him.

    The Gesta Herewardi or Herwardi is a Middle Latin text, probably written around 1109–31. The 12th century Latin text purports to be a translation of an earlier (and now lost) work in Old English, with gaps in the damaged original filled out from oral history. The earliest surviving copy of the Gesta Herewardi is in a manuscript produced around the middle of the 13th century at Peterborough Abbey, along with other materials relating to the abbey. This 13th century manuscript is known as the "Register of Robert of Swaffham".

    What is known of the earlier history of the Gesta Herewardi comes from its prologue, according to which the original text was written in Old English by Leofric, a priest of Hereward's household, who became one of his companions in arms during Hereward's resistance against William the Conqueror. Leofric's work may have been precipitated by Hereward's death. The prologue also reports that the earlier, Old English version was badly damaged, though not destroyed: the author of the Gesta Herewardi had been instructed by his superior to seek out the remains of Leofric's work and to translate it into Latin. This he did, but, owing to its damaged condition, he filled in the resulting lacunae from oral history, at his superior's insistence. It has been argued that the author of Gesta Herewardi was Richard of Ely, and that his superior was Bishop Hervey of Ely, who held that office from 1109 to 1131.


    [Alftruda]


    According to the Gesta Herewardi, Hereward was exiled at the age of eighteen for disobedience to his father and disruptive behaviour, which caused problems among the local community. He was declared an outlaw by Edward the Confessor. The Gesta tells various stories of his supposed adventures as a young man while in exile in Cornwall, Ireland and Flanders. These include a fight with an enormous bear, and the rescue of a Cornish princess from an unwanted marriage. Many historians consider these tales to be largely fictions. Having arrived in Flanders he joined an expedition against "Scaldemariland" (probably islands in Scheldt estuary). Historian Elizabeth van Houts considers this aspect of the story to be consistent with evidence concerning expeditions led by Robert the Frisian on behalf of his father Baldwin V, Count of Flanders in the early 1060s. Peter Rex also accepts that these events probably occurred.

    At the time of the Norman conquest of England, he was still in exile in Europe, working as a successful mercenary for Baldwin V. According to the Gesta he took part in tournaments in Cambrai. At some point in his exile Hereward is said to have married Turfida, a Gallo-Germanic woman from a wealthy family in Saint-Omer. She is said in the Gesta to have fallen in love with him before she met him, having heard of his heroic exploits.

    The Gesta Herwardi says Hereward returned to England a few days after the death of Count Baldwin V of Flanders, who died on 1 September 1067. The Gesta says that he discovered that his family's lands had been taken over by the Normans and his brother killed with his head then placed on a spike at the gate to his house. Hereward took revenge on the Normans who killed his brother while they were ridiculing the English at a drunken feast. He allegedly killed fifteen of them with the assistance of one helper. He then gathered followers and went to Peterborough Abbey to be knighted by his uncle Abbot Brand. He returned briefly to Flanders to allow the situation to cool down before returning to England.

    The Gesta claims that William de Warenne's brother-in-law Frederick swore to kill Hereward, but Hereward outwitted him and killed him. Since Hereward's killing of Frederick is also attested in the independent Hyde Chronicle, this event is regarded as "almost certainly" true. William himself later pursued Hereward, but Hereward supposedly unhorsed him with an arrow shot.

    In 1070 Hereward certainly participated in the anti-Norman insurrection centred on the Isle of Ely. In 1069 or 1070 the Danish king Sweyn Estrithson sent a small army to try to establish a camp on the Isle of Ely. Hereward appears to have joined them. Hereward stormed and sacked Peterborough Abbey in company with local men and Sweyn's Danes. While the Gesta says this was after the main battle at Ely, the Peterborough Chronicle says it was before. The historical consensus is that the Chronicle's account is most accurate. His justification is said to have been that he wished to save the Abbey's treasures and relics from the rapacious Normans led by the new Norman abbot who had ousted his uncle Brand. According to the Gesta he returned the treasures looted from the abbey after having a vision of Saint Peter. However, the Peterborough Chronicle says that the treasure was carried off to Denmark.

    Hereward was then joined by a small army led by Morcar, the Saxon former Earl of Northumbria who had been ousted by William. William sent an army to deal with the rebels. In 1071, Hereward and Morcar were forced to retreat to their stronghold and made a desperate stand on the Isle of Ely against the Conqueror's rule. Both the Gesta Herewardi and the Liber Eliensis claim that the Normans made a frontal assault, aided by a huge, mile-long timber causeway, but that this sank under the weight of armour and horses. The Normans then tried to intimidate the English with a witch, who cursed them from a wooden tower, but Hereward managed to set a fire that toppled the tower with the witch in it. The Gesta includes other fantastical tales about Hereward's prowess, including disguising himself as a potter to spy on the king and escaping from captivity.

    It is said that the Normans, probably led by one of William's knights named Belasius (Belsar), then bribed the monks of the island to reveal a safe route across the marshes, resulting in Ely's capture. An earlier hillfort now known as Belsar's Hill is still extant and sits astride the much older route known as Aldreth's Causeway, which would have been a direct route from the Isle of Ely to Cambridge.


    [Belsar's hill]


    Morcar was taken and imprisoned, but Hereward is said to have escaped with some of his followers into the wild fenland and to have continued his resistance. This escape is noted in all the earliest surviving sources.

    An ancient earthwork about 1.2 miles (2 km) east of Willingham, Cambridgeshire is still visible at the junction of the old fen causeway and Iram Drove. This circular feature, known as Belsar's Hill, is a potential site for a fort, built by William, from which to attack Ely and Hereward. There were perhaps as few as four causeways onto the isle itself, with this being the southerly route from London and the likely route of William's army.

    There are conflicting accounts about Hereward's life after the fall of Ely. The Gesta Herewardi says Hereward attempted to negotiate with William but was provoked into a fight with a man named Ogger. The fight led to his capture and imprisonment. His followers, however, liberated him when he was being transferred from one castle to another. Hereward's former gaoler persuaded the king to negotiate once more, and he was eventually pardoned by William and lived the rest of his life in relative peace. It also says that he married a second wife after Turfida entered a convent. She is said have been called Alftruda and was the widow of Earl Dolfin.

    Geoffrey Gaimar, in his Estoire des Engleis, says instead that Hereward lived for some time as an outlaw in the Fens, but that as he was on the verge of making peace with William, he was set upon and killed by a group of Norman knights. It is also possible that Hereward received no pardon and went into exile, never to be heard from again; this was in fact the fate of many prominent Englishmen after the Conquest. Ogger ("Oger the Breton"), either the person Hereward is supposed to have fought or an heir, appears to have taken over his lands. Joseph Harrop in his 1764 A New History of England, suggests that after his escape from Ely, Hereward went to Scotland.

    The epithet "the Wake" (Old English 'wæcnan') is first attested in the late 14th century Peterborough Chronicle, ascribed by its first editor, Joseph Sparke, to the otherwise unknown John of Peterborough. There are two main theories as to the origin of the tag. The usual interpretation is that it means "the watchful". In Charles Kingsley's novel, Hereward acquires it when, with the help of his servant Martin Lightfoot [gotta love these names :p], he foils an assassination attempt during a hunting party by a group of knights jealous of his popularity. A second theory is that the name was given to him by the Wake family, the Norman landowners who gained Hereward's land in Bourne, Lincolnshire, after his death, to imply a family connection and therefore legitimise their claim to the land. The family claimed descent from Hereward's daughter by his second wife, Alftruda.

    The existence of Hereward is not generally disputed, though the story of his life, especially as recounted in the Gesta, almost certainly contains exaggerations of his deeds and some outright fictions. Hugh M. Thomas argues that the Gesta is intended to be an entertaining story about an English hero, creating a fantasy of successful resistance to the Normans. Hereward is always motivated by honest emotions and displays chivalric values in his warfare, unlike his enemies. His supreme manly prowess is constantly emphasised. Potentially discreditable episodes such as the looting of Peterborough are excused, and even wiped out by stories such as the vision of St. Peter leading him to return the loot.

    The fact of Hereward's participation in the events at Ely is attested in early documents such as the annal for 1071 in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Another text of the Chronicle also tells of his involvement in the looting. Early sources say nothing about him other than the fact that he was at Ely and that he led the last band of resisters. Estoire des Engleis (c. 1140) says that he had a noble family, but is unspecific. His alleged genealogy is given in the Gesta and the later Historia Croylandensis, though with some variations. By the 15th century, the Wake family were claiming descent from him and elevating his ancestry by asserting that he was the son of Leofric, Earl of Mercia and Lady Godiva.

    It is possible that some of the stories about Hereward mutated into tales about Robin Hood or influenced them. Hereward nevertheless remained a minor figure until the Victorian period, when the idea of native Anglo-Saxon heroism became popular. Charles Kingsley’s 1865 novel Hereward the Wake: the Last of the English elevated Hereward to the position of a national hero. It drew on the theory that traditional English liberties were destroyed by the "Norman yoke", an idea earlier popularised in Walter Scott's novel Ivanhoe. Both novels helped create the image of a romantic Anglo-Saxon England violated by Norman tyranny. After its publication Hereward appears in numerous popular historical works.
    Last edited by paladinbob123; December 12, 2019 at 10:18 AM.
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means." - Carl von Clausewitz


  16. #1096
    Turkafinwë's Avatar Cheerful Nihilist
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    England



    “Wake up you lazy bastards! Get up! We march in an hour!” the sergeant yelled. The camp rose in relative good order and within the hour they were marching south, abandoning their positions in Shrewsbury. Captain Morcar had received news that suggested they were being surrounded and that the Welsh would be descending from all directions. Morcar had weighed his options. They couldn't go north, that would be walking right into the arms of the invading Irish, it would also bring them further from home. West they couldn't mean anything with a large force mustered at Montgomery preventing any real forray into the Welsh heartland. Going east would've been the best option in normal circumstances but when Nottingham fell that road became too dangerous to take. To the south many Welshman blocked their way but they were divided and could possibly be taken by surprise. From there they would be able to send a message to the Lord Protector to aid them, perhaps sending the Royal Navy to come and pick them up. A long shot but it was the best they had so Morcar ordered the march and when he came to the Welsh fortifications north of Gloucester he immediatly laid siege and assaulted the stronghold. The Welsh fiercly resisted the English resistance but after a hard day of fighting the English flag flew over the castle. Part one of the plan had been succesful, Morcar had secured a save base from which he could operate. Now the English Crown had only to act and come and save them.


    ***


    An agreement was arranged between the Scottish and English realms. In the wake of Irish aggression on the mainland the Scottish king agreed to end all hostilities between the Crown and the Scots. Lewes saw this as a great moral victory and now his people could focus on the Irish-Welsh coalition that was slowly but surely snaking its way closer to London. Everyone capable of wearing arms were drafted into the army. Lewes liked to take the initiative but saw the merit of a defensive stance, unlike the late king. Lewes started amassing his troops around the Oxford-London line preparing for what might be the last stand of England.

    Assassination Irish assassin


    Ireland up: http://www.mediafire.com/file/7gkmef...nd_76.sav/file

  17. #1097
    PeaMan's Avatar Centenarius
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    I'll have this up tonight or tomorrow, delay was caused due to diplomacy.



    My Modding work.. - Game of Thrones

  18. #1098

    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Perfectly understandable. The Scottish treason changes the whole StatusQuo.
    Frei zu sein, bedarf ist wenig, nur wer frei ist, ist ein König.

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    Britannia: The Isles of Chaos

  19. #1099
    PeaMan's Avatar Centenarius
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Scottish ship defeated with OW.

    Wales up - https://www.mediafire.com/file/rpvvy43rmqbu9o6/TIOC_Wales_76.sav/file



    My Modding work.. - Game of Thrones

  20. #1100
    zender9's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: [Britannia Expansion - Custom Submod] The Isles of Chaos (Roleplay Hotseat)

    Wales will side with Ireland in this war.
    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...cotland_76.sav

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