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Thread: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

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    Icon3 Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    So recently I became increasingly interested in the ideas of Hermeneutics and Phenomenology (I have thought about over the years, but not as deeply as I do now), mainly from Heidegger's teachings, and books. Anyone else here know about him, or familiar with those concepts? If yes, I would like to hear different ideas and thoughts.

    I am actually taking a course in university taught by a student of Heidegger's student. A very enjoyable class, and interesting topics.

  2. #2
    Diamat's Avatar VELUTI SI DEUS DARETUR
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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    You have to be a bit more specific. In order for this thread to work, it'd be best to discuss a specific aspect of Heidegger's thought. You should choose that aspect, address the problems, and pose questions.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamat View Post
    You have to be a bit more specific. In order for this thread to work, it'd be best to discuss a specific aspect of Heidegger's thought. You should choose that aspect, address the problems, and pose questions.
    I just wanted to know if anyone has any ideas or thoughts on those two concepts, but if you want me to be more specific I'll ask, "How is Phenomenology the Hermeneutics of the event, and how is Hermeneutics the Phenomenology of the event?"

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    Diamat's Avatar VELUTI SI DEUS DARETUR
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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Can you please elaborate?

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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamat View Post
    Can you please elaborate?
    To be more specific, How do both Phenomenology and Hermeneutics reinforce each others, and how can we as beings make use of them in our everyday life?

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    Diamat's Avatar VELUTI SI DEUS DARETUR
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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Phenomenology itself is such a broad notion. It includes a multitude of philosophers with differing views. Hermeneutics can be considered to be a type of phenomenology. How can we make use of phenomenology in everyday life? Well, that depends on the philosopher. One option would be the relativistic path, deconstructing the various constructs that constitute the phenomenal world, with the ultimate purpose being a critique of the existing and the good contained therein. I personally detest this type of phenomenology and the conclusions derived therefrom. Instead I prefer Hegel's phenomenology, because it returns into union with the existing rather than simply rejecting it.

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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Yeah phenomenology is indeed a broad topic, but it all roots back to the state of being-in-the-world. This concept is about how we perceive the phenomenons around us through our sensations to understand and make sense of them, and then bring up the concept of Hermeneutics to interpret (make thoughts and ideas about the phenomenons you experienced through the mind) the phenomenons. So without Phenomenology Hermeneutics doesn't exist because the mind can't live without the body.

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    Diamat's Avatar VELUTI SI DEUS DARETUR
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    Default Re: Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

    Well, broadly speaking, phenomenology is simply the study of phenomena. "Being-in-the-world" is a concept specific to Heidegger's philosophy.

    And I think it is a bit misleading to talk about perceiving "phenomena around us through our sensations." The sensation (Empfindung) is itself already a phenomenon (Erscheinung). It is the most immediate type of phenomenon. This sensational process is what Hegel calls the soul (die Seele), the lowest stage of mind. The actual perception of this phenomenon (of sensation) is a already a higher stage of mind, which is accomplished through a sort of self-negation. Man has left this immediate unity with nature and freed himself from his immediate situation, though this unity remains within him at all times; it has simply been sublated (aufgehoben).

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