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Thread: [UNITS] The Seleucid Kingdom

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    Default [UNITS] The Seleucid Kingdom

    The Seleucids


    Credits
    Cpt. Cortes | Lucio Boreno
    Lucio is the main creator of these units in terms of putting them together and conducting research. He wrote the variantmeshes and they are his creation.

    Mithias
    A mostly silent contributor to this mod. His research was vital to the creation of this roster as well as others.

    Arthalion | Selecid Roster Reskin
    The bulk of the new textures and models came from Arthalion's work which he graciously allowed us to use as the base for these units some months back. Without his generosity, these units would look far different.

    CyrpticOutcast
    CrypticOutcast helped Lucio to complete the units and piece them all together.

    Aguirre | Radious Pergamonium + Knossos/Rhodos
    A number of models used in the creation of these units were taken from the wonderful work done by Aguirre.

    The Total War Hellas Team
    M.E.P Unit Pack (Macedonia | Epirus | Pontus | Seleucids) is here
    S.A.P Unit Pack (Sparta | Athens | Ptolemeans l Bactria) is here
    M.H.F.Unit Pack (Rhodes l Pergamon l Massalia l Cimmeria is here

    Divide et Impera
    As always going forward, a number of DeI elements have been incoropraed into the above units.

    The Legionaire Army Mod
    Last, but not least. This one will make an appearance in just about every unit preview we do. Simply put, a massive and beautiful overhaul of Rome 2's units with a large number of new elements. Some of the best modding work anyone has done. We would like to thank Attila once again for the permission, but also the rest of the team - Aguirre (again), KLA, DramaBelli, Moonwalker, Tenerife_Boy, and loulakion.



    The Units
    Katoikoi Pezhetairoi (Military-Settler Phalanx) - Tier 1
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The largest corps of the Seleucid regular army, as with any Successor army, was the Phalanx. Composed primarily of men of Greco-Macedonian origin, the troops of the phalanx were drawn from the numerous military settlements founded throughout the Seleucid Empire by Alexander the Great and the Diadochi. These men were allotted plots of land by Alexander and the Successors and in turn were called upon to serve on campaign. Once the campaign came to an end, these men were dismissed to returned and cultivate their farms.

    Their armament is described by Asclepiodotus (Tactics 5.1-2), as the round bronze Macedonian shield, 8 palms in diameter (61.68 cm) and very little concaved. The shield was rimless and smaller than the traditional Greek aspis. Their primary weapon was the Macedonian Sarrissa, a monstrous spear of between 10 – 14 cubits (4.6 m – 6.5 m). Longer than the spears of Alexander’s troops (circa 3.5 m), the lengthening of the spear was attributed to Antigonus the One-Eye and adopted by all the Successor States. This massive spear had to be held by both hands and thus the shield was strapped to the forearm of the soldier. Fighting in a phalanx block formation, the pikes of the first five ranks projected beyond the phalanx, while the rear ranks held their pikes at an angle over the front ranks, allowing protection from missiles which fell from above. As a secondary weapon, both the curved machaira/kopis and the straight bladed xiphos short-swords were carried.

    While the phalanx were virtually impregnable from the front, it was highly vulnerable to rear and flank attacks, and needed to be protected by lightly armoured, more mobile infantry and cavalry. The other weakness of the phalanx being rough terrain which broke-up the unified formation.



    Katoikoi Pezhetairoi (Military-Settler Phalanx) - Tier 2
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    Wealthier than their counterparts above, these men can afford better armor to include mail and decorative items.


    Chalkaspides (Bronze Shields)
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    Historically, the Chalkaspides was an Antigonid (Macedonian) unit armed in the Macedonian style with sarrisa pike and Macedonian rimless shield. The shield was covered in polished bronze, giving them their name, the Bronze Shields. In the Seleucid army they are only attested by Polybius as a Phalanx unit in the army of Antiochus IV at the Daphnae Parade. They appear to have a higher status than the katoikoi phalanx but not as elite as the Argyraspides. Since they are only mentioned after the fall of the Macedonian Kingdom, historians have suggested that the unit was created by Antiochus IV (a Macedonian himself) in honour of the Macedonian unit.



    Argyraspides (Silver Shields)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Argyraspides were the elite Infantry Guard of the Seleucid armies ‘chosen from the whole kingdom’ (Polybius 5.79.4). Brandishing silver gilded Macedonian shields from which they draw their name, they numbered 10 000 men. Unlike the katoikoi phalanx, these men served on a permanent bases and kept at the center of the Empire in service of the Seleucid king. They are distinguished as the Royal Cohort by Livy (37.40.7) and took the position of honour on the right of the phalanx next to the king. These men were recruited from the very best of the sons of military settlers, and served in the elite unit until they inherited and took over their fathers’ allotted plot of land.

    They were armoured in the same fashion as the katoikoi (the Macedonian Style) but armed from the Royal Treasuries, they wielded the very best armour and arms gold could buy with a unique flamboyant flare. Their endurance and ability was well renown and they accompanied the king on force-marches and were present at every major Seleucid battle.



    Hypaspists (Shield-Bearers)
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    The Hypaspists were an elite crack-infantry unit within the Argyraspides. They were used in special assault missions such as the Siege of Sardis in 214 BC and could operate in rough terrain as at the Battle of Cyrrhestica and served as the personal bodyguard of the Seleucid monarch, fighting around the king himself as at the Battle of Panion. Armed as the situation required in the highest quality gear; they could stand in the main battle-line, heavily armoured in bronze cuirasses, doru thrusting spears and large aspis, or more lightly armed with javelins, swords and pelte shields for outflanking maneuvers, assaults on cities and operations in rough terrain.



    Thorakitai Argyraspides (Silver-Shield Thorakitai, aka the Romanized Infantry)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The adoption of Roman arms and armour was a very late development in the Seleucid Army. Romanized troops are first mentioned in the army of Antiochus IV at the Daphnae Parade in 164 BC. Rome had beaten the Seleucid and Macedonian phalanxes on several occasions and the adoption of Roman arms was thus a logical next step for progress of the Seleucid Army. Their defensive equipment was in lorica hamata (chain-mail) armour, a Roman scutum or Greek thureos shield, and bronze open faced helm of the Montefortino type or other similar open faced Greek helms. Their offensive gear included heavy javelins (probably of the pilum type) and the Greek xiphos or gladius Hispaniensis.

    They numbered 5 000 at the Daphnae Parade while the Argyraspides who always numbered 10 000, now numbered 5 000 as well. It has been suggested that half of the Argyraspides were now retained to fight in the Roman fashion.



    Tarantines (Light Cavalry)
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    At both the battles of Panion and Magnesia, Antiochus III employed a group of Tarentine cavalry. Light horsemen, armed with javelins and small shields. The unit originated in Tarsus in Southern Italy in the fifth century BC. The fighting style of the horsemen from Tarus became so popular during the Hellenistic Era, that Macedon, Athens, the Achaean army, Ptolemaic Egypt, Sparta, Syracuse and the Seleucids trained their own units fighting in this style and the name ‘Tarenine’ stuck. Arrian in his Tactica (4.5-6) describes two types of Tarentines; ‘Pure Tarentines’ who only engaged the enemy from afar with their javelins and ‘Light Tarentines’ who carried two javelins and a sword. The ‘Light Tarentines’ would either cast one javelin at the enemy and then charge with their second, or cast both and charge with their swords, denoting a type of medium cavalry. The Pure Tarentine probably wore no armour with the exception of a helm while the Lights probably wore a lino-thorax or leather armour. Tarentines were katoikoi, military settlers, but given more land to farm than the settlers serving in the phalanx, in order to maintain their horses, an expensive commodity in ancient times. Other means of obtaining Tarentine were to recruit them as hired soldiers as they seem to have been a popular mercenary unit.



    Katoikoi Lonchoporoi (Javelin Cavalry)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The lonchoporoi were military settlers as the xystophoroi with larger portions of land grants allowing them the means of raising their own horses and supplying the Seleucid army with cavalry. They fought with the Greek lonche, a spear for both throwing and melee purpose. They were however slightly lighter armed than the xystophoroi, making them more nimble and able to conduct scout duties and chase down enemy skirmishers and light cavalry. What they lack in quality armour, they make up for with a shield since the lonche can be wielded with one hand.



    Katoikoi Xystophoroi (Lancer Cavalry)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    These lancers were military settlers of mostly Greco-Macedonian decent given larger plots of land to farm than the katoikoi which served in the phalanx, affording them more money to keep horses of their own and time to train in horsemanship. Their armour was of good quality but nothing of the likes of the Agema or Hetairoi. Nor were they a permanent corps such as the Guard Cavalry. They still had to see to their lands and oversee the peasants working them and thus were dismissed once the campaign came to an end. They carried into battle the two-handed Greek xyston and a kopis sword as a secondary weapon.



    Hetairoi (Companion Cavalry)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Hetaitoi were a second elite guard cavalry in the Seleucid Army. Consisting of 1000 horsemen, exclusive to the Greco-Macedonian elite, they were primarily recruited from the military settlements in Syria, Phrygia and Lydia (Livy 37.40.6). They, as the Agema, were accustomed to serve around the king, sometime at alternate battles, or both the Agema and Hetairoi at the same time as at Raphia. As with the Agema, the Hetairoi were armed with the best arms and armour money could buy. Since membership was restricted to Greco-Macedonians, their arms and armour reflected the popular Hellenistic arms of the day. Either armed with the two handed Greek xyston or two shorter dual-purpose lonche spears which could be thrown or used in melee combat. Flaminius (Plut. Flam. 17.5), the Roman general, actually described the Seleucid Cavalry of Antiochus III as lonchoporoi and xystophoroi. The shorter lonche allowed for the use of a shield, giving better protection whilst in melee and from missile fire. The downside of the shorter spear however, was that it took away some of the impetuousness and shock of the charge. Both carried either the curved kopis or straight xiphos swords. It is believed that the division of those with shields and those without was about 50/50. As for armour these men wore the highest quality bronze ‘bell-shaped’ cavalry cuirasses inlaid with silver designs and personal artistic flares as these equipment were custom designed and made to reflect the Hetairoi’s elite status and wealth. As with the Agema, these troops rode armoured horses but not to the extent of the kataphraktoi. Livy (37.40.11) actually mentions their arms and armour similar to the kataphraktoi, but man and horse were slightly less armoured.



    Kataphraktoi (Cataphract Cavalry)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Antiochus the Great’s Anabasis to the East at the end of the 3rd Century, saw major campaigns against the Parthians and the Bactrians. Both these nations’ cavalry were heavily influenced by the nomadic cavalry warriors on their borders who made use of extremely heavily armoured cavalry units used to deliver devastating charges. Upon return, Antiochus had adopted the cavalry tactics of his enemies and incorporated these super-heavy cavalry known as kataphraktoi, into his army. At Panion, the sheer weight of the kataphraktoi charge was so devastating that it shatter the Ptolemaic Aetolian mercenary cavalry (at that point considered to be the best cavalry in the world).

    They carrying either the very long Steppe kontos lance or the Greek xyston (both wielded with two hands) and a kopis for a secondary weapon. The rider was fully armoured from head to toe and thus made no use of a shield. Depictions of Saka and later Parthian cataphracts as well as the archaeological excavations at Aļ Khanoum show that riders wore segmented plates around their legs and arms. The Pergamum victory relief Temple of Athena Polias Nikephoros which is believed to depict cataphract armour also shows arm and leg protection of this type as well as a complete facemask and a bronze musculata cuirass. The Bactrian find at Aļ Khanoum, show body armour of scales. Horses were also fully armour with bronze facemask and a tapper-coat of laminar or bronze. The find at Aļ Khanoum shows a winged chest-plate which protected the flanks of the horse as well as the legs of the rider. All the heavy armour however came at a price. The horse and man quickly tired carrying such heavy armour. They therefore only had limited use and were not able to multiple charges without rest. They were not able to chase after other cavalry units or they would quickly succumb to exhaustion as the Palmyran kataphraktoi did, chasing after the Roman horse. The Roman horse, once the enemy were exhausted, promptly turned about and made short work of the heavily armourd cataphracts. Their other weakness was their loss of agility and nimbleness. At Magnesia, these units were too slow to get out of the way of the scythed chariots and were cut to pieces. Livy attributes this to their heavy armour.



    Agema (Guard Cavalry)
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    Described by Polybius (30.25.8) as the very best of the Seleucid Cavalry, the Agema was made up of 1 000 elite horsemen drawn from the Median nobility. The Medes had a long and proud tradition as superb cavalrymen. Being raised on large estates on the plains of Media and with peasants and slaves working their lands, the sons of noblemen had plenty of time to become one with their horses and learn the arts of war. At the Battle of Magnesia they took the position on the right wing, the position of honour, enforcing their elite status. At both Raphia and Magnesia, the Agema were able to defeat and route the forces opposing them.

    The Agema were clad in the most exquisite and ornate armour and decorated helms with colorful plumes, befitting Median nobility. Much of the armour would retain an ‘Eastern’ or ‘Median’ flare and scale armour would very likely have been worn along with the Greek influenced ‘bell-shaped’ bronze cavalry-cuirasses. They were armed with the Macedonian xyston cavalry spear and carried a long curved kopis or a cavalry axe, both already in popular use among the Median cavalry of the Achaemenid Empire. They rode large warhorses, very likely of the Nisean breed, which were armoured, albeit not to the extent of the kataphraktoi. The horse most probably wore a bronze chamfron (facemask) along with a neck guard and a poitrail (chest plate) of scale or laminar armour. These horsemen, being such an elite, needed to remain nimble and swift for outflanking maneuvers and continuous charges, and thus could not be over laden with armour. While the kataphtaktoi were completely armoured, the horses quickly tired due to the weight as proven by the Palmyran and Parthian kataphraktoi in Rome’s Parthian and Palmyran Wars. They also lost their nimbleness and maneuverability as described by Livy when Antiochus III’s katapraktoi were too slow, due to their armour, to get out of the way of the scythed-chariots at Magnesia. It is for these reasons that the Agema were not as heavily armoured as the Kataphraktoi.



    Thureophoroi (Thureos-Bearers)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The fighting style of the thureophoroi, who were named so after their large oval shields they carried, became very popular throughout the Hellenistic era. The Celtic invasions from the 280’s introduced the thureos to the Greeks who eagerly adopted it. These troops were a medium type infantry, able to skirmish but also hold their own in melee. They lacked the heavy armour and equipment to last long against heavier opponents but made up for this in their agility, speed and ability to operate in rough terrain. They could easily outflank heavier troops and strike at their flanks or rear. They carried several javelins to weaken their opponents before they close for melee with their spears or swords.



    Thorakitai (Cuirassiers)
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    Thorakitai were only mentioned in the Achaean army and in the Seleucid army. In both armies, they operated in support of light troops in rough terrain. The very name states that they wore armour but of what kind we do not know. We may assume that for them to operate in rough terrain they were armoured in flexible light armour. In the Seleucid account, the operated in mountainous warfare and thus flexible chain-mail comes to mind. They would be able to charge enemy troops who were tide down by the light troops and since they were armoured they had a major advantage over their enemies in rough terrain. We may assume they favored a lighter thueros over the heavier aspis shield. Since they fought in mountain areas, a long spear would probably be cumbersome and they most likely favored a short sword of the xiphos kind and javelins.



    Elephantes Indikoi (Indian Elephants)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    War elephants were a prominent feature in Seleucid armies from the earliest beginnings at the Battle of Ipsus. At Ipsus 301 BC, Seleucus used them as a screen to ruin Demetrius’ cavalry charge. In 279 BC, Antiochus I uses 16 elephants to shatter the Galatian line at the Battle of the Elephants. At Raphia, Antiochus used elephants to break the Egyptian left wing of elephants and elite Egyptian Agema guard unit in 217 BC. War elephants however, were a two edged blade. They were prone to panic and could run amok, trampling friends and foe alike. At Zama, the great Carthaginian general Hannibal, saw his left wing devastated when one of his elephants were driven back onto his own line. At Magnesia, Antiochus’ elephants were harassed by skirmishers until they were driven to panic and crashed into the Seleucid phalanx, shattering the formation.

    The majority of Seleucid elephants came from India, supplied by the Mauryan Empire through treaties with the Seleucids. Elephant studs were also established with some success in Syria itself, supplying Seleucid generals with the valuable beasts of war. On top of the elephants back were howdahs or towers, carrying up to four men with long sarrisae pikes, bows or javelins, giving them excellent height to stab down from or snipe at their enemies. The Seleucids were known to armour their elephants, and depictions of Seleucid elephants show them clad in scale armour, chamfron head pieces and a type of segmented armour around their legs.



    Elephantes Kataphraktoi Indikoi (Armoured Indian Elephants)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    War elephants were a prominent feature in Seleucid armies from the earliest beginnings at the Battle of Ipsus. At Ipsus 301 BC, Seleucus used them as a screen to ruin Demetrius’ cavalry charge. In 279 BC, Antiochus I uses 16 elephants to shatter the Galatian line at the Battle of the Elephants. At Raphia, Antiochus used elephants to break the Egyptian left wing of elephants and elite Egyptian Agema guard unit in 217 BC. War elephants however, were a two edged blade. They were prone to panic and could run amok, trampling friends and foe alike. At Zama, the great Carthaginian general Hannibal, saw his left wing devastated when one of his elephants were driven back onto his own line. At Magnesia, Antiochus’ elephants were harassed by skirmishers until they were driven to panic and crashed into the Seleucid phalanx, shattering the formation.

    The majority of Seleucid elephants came from India, supplied by the Mauryan Empire through treaties with the Seleucids. Elephant studs were also established with some success in Syria itself, supplying Seleucid generals with the valuable beasts of war. On top of the elephants back were howdahs or towers, carrying up to four men with long sarrisae pikes, bows or javelins, giving them excellent height to stab down from or snipe at their enemies. The Seleucids were known to armour their elephants, and depictions of Seleucid elephants show them clad in scale armour, chamfron head pieces and a type of segmented armour around their legs.



    Symmachoi Toxotai Syriakoi (Syrian Archers under treaty of service)
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    With Macedonians serving as the heavy cavalry and infanry, auxilla troops provided vital support. Syrians often served as light troops and archers.



    Symmachoi Toxotai Kretikoi (Cretan Archers under treaty of service) - Early
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    Cretans had been serving as mercenaries, especially as archers, from the earliest Greek conflicts. What made them popular as mercenaries was not just their exceptional archery skills, but their ability to act as light infantry as well. They are often described as carrying shields, aspidiotai (small round shields). Depictions of what is believed to be Cretan archers wear lino-thorax armour and attic and pylos helms and a short sword. The combination of shield and armour suggests that they could close in melee with the enemy. This gave them a great advantage over other skirmishers giving them staying ability when fighting hand-to-hand.

    In Seleucid service, they are described as symmachoi, a term which suggests that they were not normal mercenaries, but that they were recruited through special treaties between Cretan cities and the Seleucid Empire, allowing for a constant supply of these valuable archers for the Seleucid monarch. This explains why they were present at almost every major Seleucid battle.



    Symmachoi Toxotai Kretikoi (Cretan Archers under treaty of service) - Late
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    Cretan troops in Seleucid service were often re-equipped at the royal expense. With better armour and equipment, they doubled as light assault troops as well as dangerous archers.



    Thanvare Payahdag (Persian Archers)
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    Persian archers were well renowned for their archery skills. They were armed with a Persian composite bow of 1.2 m in length. The length of the bow and the use of long reed arrows shafts allowed them to outrange most European bows. Persian archers were pure skirmishers and would be cut to pieces should they be caught in a melee since they wore virtually no armour and armed only with a light axe or dagger. They could operate in rough terrain and snipe at their enemies or stand in front of the main battle line, raining arrows upon the advancing enemy. Once the enemy came too close, they could fall back behind the phalanx and continue to shoot volleys on the advancing enemy. They could devastate a cavalry contingent as arrows could easily find their mark on a large target that is a man and horse… as long as they had the right type of protection in the form of supporting cavalry or infantry they could retire behind, if the enemy cavalry charged.



    Kyrtioi Sphendonetai (Cyrtian Slingers)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Cyrtian were possibly a Kurdish tribe from the mountainous area of Persia. Polybius (5.52.5) tells us that the Median Satrap Molon, during his revolt against the Seleucid King Antiochus III, relied heavily upon these slingers and believed he could defeat the Royal army in the mountain passes due to their skill. The Cyrtians lived hard lives in the mountains and learning the use of a sling was essential for survival. It was used as protection for their small flocks against wild animals and bandits as well as for hunting. They also served Antiochus the Great at Magnesia. During Antiochus’ campaigns against the Parthians we are told that his slingers in the Elburz Mountains inflicted more casualties than any other unit against their enemies. It is possible that these slingers were the famous Cyrtians.



    Kilikes Euzonoi (Cilician Skirmishers)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Cilicians were expert light infantry and skirmishers. They carried round bucklers and small thureos shields and armed with several javelins, axes or kopis swords. Wearing very little armour they were able to move fast and outflank enemy positions and operate in rough terrain. While they were brave fighters, their lack of armour meant they were not able to stand against heavy infantry or in the main battle line. Their main function was to weaken an enemy with javelins and then close for hand-to hand combat or assault the unprotected flanks of heavy troops. They served the Seleucids in several battles and at the Daphnae Parade they were given gold crowns, most likely for distinctive service against the Ptolemies. Parts of Cilicia was under Seleucid control and the remainder was under heavy Seleucid influence, insuring the constant supply of Cilician troops to the Empire.



    Symmachoi Pisidioi Zanteush (Psidian Hillmen)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Pisidia was the autonomous mountain area separating the Seleucid and Ptolemaic territories. Both kingdoms sought the alliance of these warlike mountain people who were expert skirmishers and light infantry. Though they wore too little armour, with only a small round buckler for defense, and lacked the discipline to stand in the main battle line. They could close with lighter troops and hack them apart with their axes or break-up heavier formations with their heavy javelins.
    The Pisidians in Seleucid service are describes as symmachoi and thus recruited through special treaties acting as allies who are rewarded with gold for their service.



    Kardouchoi Pantodapoi (Kurdish Native Spearmen)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    These Kurdish spearmen were provided by the client-kingdom of Media Atropatene. Antiochus III, after breaking Molon’s revolt, invaded Atropatene, who had declared itself fully autonomous, and established it as a client-kingdom once again. Being a client-kingdom, Atropatene was obliged to supply the Seleucids with manpower. The Kurdish soldiers supplied by Atropatene were levy spearmen with little training and poor arms. Armed with a basic spear, no armour and a large wicker sparabara shield, they can take on other levy and light troop and hold their own against light cavalry. They have poor moral and will be the first to break when the odds are stack against them since they have little commitment to the Seleucid cause. But they are cheap, expendable units, a means for a strategos to preserve and not bleed out his Seleucid troops proper.



    Katoikoi Agrianikoi (Agrianian Military Settlers)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    A Paeonian-Thracian people, they were military-settlers around Persis (Polyaenus 7.40) who maintained their own fighting style instead of serving in the phalanx. The Agrianians were excellent skirmishers and skilled with bows, slings and especially javelins. Already in the days of Alexander, they were elite skirmishers who often supported cavalry and the elite hypaspists. Although mainly skirmishers, these troops could serve as assault troops once they weakened their enemy with volleys of javelins. They were armed with axes and curved sica blades, which were lethal in their hands but due to the lack of armour with only a light thureos, they would not last too long in a melee.



    Katoikoi Thraikes (Thracian Military Settlers)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Polyaenus (7.40) tells us that the Seleucids settled Thracians and Agrianian tribesmen in the area of Persis as katoikoi. They were given land to farm in return for military service. They were thus not unlike the Greco-Macedonian katoikoi but instead of serving in the phalanx, they retained their own fighting style and weapons forming a specialized type of infantry.

    The Thracians were a warlike people who are describes by Herodotus as having the potential of being the most powerful people in the world if they could only stop fighting amongst themselves. They were mercenaries in high demand throughout Greek history and Thracian warriors could be found fighting in almost every major battle during the Hellenistic era. It was thus no wonder that the Seleucids settled such warlike people in their lands.

    The Seleucids employed their Thracians as semi-heavy infantry who could fight in the main battle line protecting the flanks of the phalanx or as assault-troops who, in their lighter equipment, could outflank enemy formations and operate in rough terrain. Armed with a rhomphaia, a long, two-handed slightly curved blade of up to 60 cm with a handle of about the same length, which could cut through shields, armour and flesh. At the Kallinikos skirmish, they devastated the Roman cavalry by hamstringing the horses with their rhomphaiae and decapitated Roman infantry. They wore Hellenistic-Greek hems, greaves and slung a small thureos shield over their shoulders. All Thracians were excellent skirmishers and threw javelins before their charge.



    Symmachoi Galatikoi (Galatians under treaty of service) - Early
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Galatians were a Celtic people who carved out a kingdom for themselves in central Anatolia. They were a confederacy of three tribes situated around Ankyra. They served in Seleucid armies as allies, conscripts and mercenaries but it appears that there was eventually a formal treaty established between the Galatian kingdom and the Seleucids supplying troops to the Empire. They were a warlike people who had a warrior culture at its core. Brave to the point of recklessness they were armed with longswords and large thureos shields. They discharged heavy javelins before descending upon their enemies with a ferocious charge. They were mostly unarmoured with the exception of their nobility and fought bare chested with just a Celtic helm and even naked at times. Even though they lacked armour, their ferocity allowed them to stand in the main battle line or act as heavy assault infantry. Galatians even served as bodyguards to some Hellenistic rulers and served as officers in the Seleucid army.



    Symmachoi Galatikoi (Galatians under treaty of Service) - Late/Heavy
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    Wallpapers by Petellius
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    Last edited by ABH2; September 07, 2015 at 07:25 PM.


  2. #2

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Looks amazing, really looking forward to this mod! Seleucids have been my favourite faction since RTW 1, glad to see them being given justice. Good work, so many cool looking units =)

  3. #3
    Hoplite of Ilis's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    It looks real nice. My concern is elsewhere though... Even though I own ATW, I haven't played it much. Begun as Eastern Roman Empire, but never finished it. I got bored. Will this mod play better in ATW than R2TW? In terms of RTW vs R2TW as gameplay?...

  4. #4
    Smiling Hetairoi's Avatar Semisalis
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    A really well done preview!

  5. #5
    ipwnu678's Avatar Semisalis
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    I'm glad to see the silver shield pikes and swords that I use in R2 included! Now I don't know whether to play Roma or Seleucid Empire first!

    Also the Agema preview is a little too dark

  6. #6
    The Wandering Storyteller's Avatar Content Staff
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    By far one of the most excellent previews I have seen for the Selecuids, and I love the style of the units! This is reminding me of Artheaon's Selecuid Reskin from Rome 2. I am eager to make some epic screenshots, and is the update ready?

    Kudos to Lucio and the team, glad to see TWH and Little Legionnaire's army mod, this is going to be an excellent roster! This is quality!

    Hetoari, Bronze Shields, Cataphracts are my fav units!
    Last edited by The Wandering Storyteller; September 07, 2015 at 11:30 AM.





















































  7. #7

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    It's not shown well in our preview, but there is also a new, longer pike that looks pretty nice in game made by William.


  8. #8

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Nice. Your plain Thorakitai look more legionary - like than your romanised thorakitai though

  9. #9

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    There's a few tweaks we may still make to these units. The thorakitai and silver shield thorakitai/imitation legions could still be differentiated more. Giving all thorakitai mail armor may not be entirely appropriate. But even determining what the hell the thorakitai are is an issue in itself.

    Otherwise, I think we may want to revisit the cavalry shields. Otherwise, I'm very happy with the depiction of the Seleucids here.

    [w


  10. #10

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    There's a few tweaks we may still make to these units. The thorakitai and silver shield thorakitai/imitation legions could still be differentiated more. Giving all thorakitai mail armor may not be entirely appropriate. But even determining what the hell the thorakitai are is an issue in itself.

    Otherwise, I think we may want to revisit the cavalry shields. Otherwise, I'm very happy with the depiction of the Seleucids here.

    It looks real nice. My concern is elsewhere though... Even though I own ATW, I haven't played it much. Begun as Eastern Roman Empire, but never finished it. I got bored. Will this mod play better in ATW than R2TW? In terms of RTW vs R2TW as gameplay?...
    Well, best answer we can give is we'll see. We certainly intend for it to be better. It's why we are doing this.

    And thanks to your team for the wonderful units you guys made.


  11. #11
    Hoplite of Ilis's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Yeah, everybody's trying! I haven't played ATW so much - in order to know how much better than R2 really is (in terms of mechanics). Let us hope ATW provides something more...

  12. #12

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    I would personally say that even in Rome 2 AE it's pretty darn interesting and its not finished. when we've finally got the complexity we want, coupled with Attila's extra features it SHOULD be pretty cool to play.
    Vespasian's own: Up the Augusta! For Cato!

    AE: Battle Balancing and BAI.

  13. #13

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    These units look Great! Being a Fanboy of Baktria I eagerly await to see what you have in store for them unit wise

  14. #14
    ipwnu678's Avatar Semisalis
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Quote Originally Posted by b257 View Post
    These units look Great! Being a Fanboy of Baktria I eagerly await to see what you have in store for them unit wise
    A year ago I had my room redecorated from dark blue to red - the radiators were also dark blue, but I didn't want them painting over due to how the colour scheme reminded me of the Baktrian colour scheme in R2. I loved my campaign with them!

  15. #15

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Quote Originally Posted by Petellius View Post
    I would personally say that even in Rome 2 AE it's pretty darn interesting and its not finished. when we've finally got the complexity we want, coupled with Attila's extra features it SHOULD be pretty cool to play.
    It'll be a monumental piece of art in TWC modding history my friend.

    Hats off!

  16. #16

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    great work with the seleucid empire very historical accuracy to the units. i hope the same with the makedon. you have my support! Keep up the good work

  17. #17

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Fantastic!!! Awesome mod
    Do we have an ETA?

  18. #18
    Willhelm123's Avatar Decanus
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    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Middle 2016 estimate.
    AE Dev, mainly units

  19. #19

    Default Re: [PREVIEW] The Seleucid Empire

    Thanks!

  20. #20

    Default Re: [UNITS] The Seleucid Kingdom

    The silver shields look boss in this preview, but in game they don't have any shin protection, in addition to not looking quite as cool, I'd feel pretty naked with my tiny shield and my exposed shins. I'd also like to see them with their Divide Et Impera Red pikes.. The painted pikes just completes them and makes them look like the cream of the crop

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