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Thread: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

  1. #1
    Hresvelgr's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    As the title says, I'm starting this thread to collect whatever information there is available on that most famous yet enigmatic tribes of steppe nomads; the Huns. Web sources preferred for the sake of simplicity, but with Attila having been announced it's as good a time as any for the denizens of the TWC to learn about the primary antagonists of this upcoming game. Also, I suppose I have to say this, but I do not give a damn about the pointless stuff about ethnic heritage and DNA, I want info on what the Huns were like as people and what effect they had on history, not the endless nattering and bickering on DNA groups and percentages and yadayadayada that I know some people think so important.
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    Hae_Shin's Avatar Foederatus
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    An impression of Hungarian artist about Huns


    More impressions on Atilla and The Huns from Osprey artists






    And this map, it shows the famous Hunnic and Xiongnu cauldrons' locations. It's a fascinatingfact that same type of cauldrons were casted from Asia to Europe. A very powerful clue that shows Xiongnu and Huns are probably the same people.



    Osprey materials removed due to copyright issues - Maximinus Thrax
    Last edited by Maximinus Thrax; October 02, 2014 at 11:56 AM.

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    Hae_Shin's Avatar Foederatus
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources


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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Hun Art
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Hun Warfare
    http://www.ernak-horde.com/Hun_warfare.html

    Huns still live Hungary
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Huns horse archery speed
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Last edited by Maximinus Thrax; October 03, 2014 at 12:38 AM. Reason: youtube videos fixed

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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    That Military Equipment is not Hunnic, that's Khazar, Pecheng, or Cuman.

    That article is wrong: the Huns did not use the Sagaris ("Scythian Axe"). There is no evidence for its use by them whatsoever, not even in Central Asia.

    The Huns had women warriors in their ranks.
    . The Sarmatians did, but these women were nobles and were generals, they did not fight on the front lines of battle and many burials with armor and weapons were ceremonial: they were placed in there as status symbols, not something the Women actually used.

    A superior bow, however, was vital to the Huns' dominance.
    The Hunnic bow had been in use by the Sarmatians, Alans, and Sassanids, and even the Romans, for about 3 centuries by the time they entered Europe. They did not have a superior bow.

    ...Which gave them the ability to fight year round...
    Not according to the Strategikon, which shows that the Nomadic Huns on the steppes were crippled in winter, from roughly November to March.

    And his description of a Hunnic battle is complete BS. As someone who has researched Hunnic warfare and the only one really to do so in a professional manner other than Christian Miks or Maenchen-Helfen, I can give sources and archaeological information that contradict many of these dated theories on the Huns.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Martial women was not so alien to steppe peoples, but of course that doesn't means it was a common practice.

    If I have to speak for only Turkish(Turks of Turkey) history, book of Dede Korkut mentions martial women who rivals men, there were several cases of female feudal rulers even in Islamic period, there was a female organization in Anatolia called Sisters of Anatolia, a largely religious organization which some claims had martial aspects. In Anatolia sightings of rough, maleish women who rides horses and does mannish jobs wasn't/isn't alien, in families, eldest females has a strong voice, sometimes even strong enough to suppress male leader, and most of these examples are from Islamic period in which a lot of the independence of women is lost.
    Last edited by Tureuki; October 03, 2014 at 11:34 AM.

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    Hresvelgr's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    If I may, I'll bring up Hae_Shin's link to a very nice document he posted on a different thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Hae_Shin View Post
    Below, you can access to the full account that Priscus of Panium wrote about The Huns and Attila.

    http://www29.homepage.villanova.edu/...as/embassy.htm
    Of course the Roman authors tended to be highly biased but some of these entries contain very interesting bits of information. Particularly the one part with a Greek who had taken up Hun ways and gave his justifications for such, and condemnations of the Roman state.
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    Cohors_Evocata's Avatar Ordinarius
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    The World of the Huns: Studies in Their History and Culture, by the late Otto J. Maenchen-Helfen. (Should link to the whole book, not to a mere preview.)

    Started reading this yesterday as an introduction to the Huns and out of curiosity towards Antiquity in general. I am not qualified to make any statements on controversy or reliability, but I've seen nothing thatīs made me frown in doubt or disbelief as of yet.
    I tend to edit my posts once or several times after writing and uploading them. Please keep this in mind when reading a recent post of mine. Also, should someone, for some unimaginable reason, wish to rep me, please add your username in the process, so I can at least know whom to be grateful towards.

    My thanks in advance.

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    Hresvelgr's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Seems alright to me, great find!
    I'm not crazy, I'm the only one who's not crazy!


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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Quote Originally Posted by Cohors_Evocata View Post
    The World of the Huns: Studies in Their History and Culture, by the late Otto J. Maenchen-Helfen. (Should link to the whole book, not to a mere preview.)

    Started reading this yesterday as an introduction to the Huns and out of curiosity towards Antiquity in general. I am not qualified to make any statements on controversy or reliability, but I've seen nothing thatīs made me frown in doubt or disbelief as of yet.
    It's really good, having read it all and cross-referenced it against more modern material, but a lot of it is dated. I recommend you read that, and then read this:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=jCp...page&q&f=false

    That's a preview, but to understand Kim's work you have to read his footnotes, which are as long as his book is. The full book is like 80 bucks though.

    I have more resources as well, but they're all PDF's of papers written for journals, etc, and I can't upload most of them publicly, but if you're looking for anything in particular PM me and I'll see what I can do.

  12. #12
    Hresvelgr's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    So if I'm reading that one right, then would I be correct to assume that when the tribal conglomeration that formed the Huns broke up upon the deaths of Attila and his heirs, that some of the tribes that split off later became the Bulgars among others? Sorry if I'm mistaken here because this is a very new field of history to me, stuff like Utigurs and Kutrigurs seems very alien to me as I'd never really immersed myself in the history of the Eurasian steppes much.
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    The Oghur Bulgars were not the same Bulgars who would form Bulgaria, and many of them were not from Attila's Empire, they were more Hunnic groups coming into Europe.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Hi mate. The Oghur Bulgars were nonexistant, there is not a single written (ancient or medieval) source in which they are mentioned. As far as Kim's goes, for me he is biased and Helfen is the one to go onward with. For example, Kim (as many others) blindly follows Ammianus' description of the huns and their way of life disregarding the fact that in those parts Ammianus is just copying the works of Pompeius Trogus (mostly his descriptions of the schytians and parthians) and Pomponius Mela (his description of the german tribes). Basicly from all of the authors writting about the huns, the only one who actually had the chance to live with them or has ever seen a hun was Priscus. And he wasn't at all shocked by their appearance (sic!), he even mistook a greek merchant for a hun.
    Last edited by Decapitator; October 14, 2014 at 12:19 PM.

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    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    I know Kim has bias, but Helfen is horribly outdated, I've read his work.

    The Oghur Bulgars are like the Byzantines, both are misnomers: one are the Huns, the other are the Romans.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Hunnic History and Culture Resources

    Quote Originally Posted by Hae_Shin View Post
    An impression of Hungarian artist about Huns


    More impressions on Atilla and The Huns from Osprey artists






    And this map, it shows the famous Hunnic and Xiongnu cauldrons' locations. It's a fascinatingfact that same type of cauldrons were casted from Asia to Europe. A very powerful clue that shows Xiongnu and Huns are probably the same people.



    Osprey materials removed due to copyright issues - Maximinus Thrax
    A very ugly picture of Attila. Here is another picture of Attila with a nasty piece of face. ( Funny how they put a handsome Scottish highlander to play the role )




    There is evidence that links Huns and Xiongnu but it isn't enough.
    Last edited by Beyond; October 15, 2014 at 01:51 AM.

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