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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #401

  2. #402
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Some articles on Alexander can be found in the new issue of the Anabasis journal.

    Franca Landucci (Italy)
    Alexander, the Crown Prince
    Sabine Müller (Germany)
    Alexander and Macedonian Relations with Thebes – A Reassessment
    Luisa Prandi (Italy)
    Byzantium and Alexander the Great: A Convergence of Interests
    Nicholas Victor Sekunda (Poland)
    Alexander and Demaratus of Corinth at the Battle of the River Granicus
    Silvia Panichi (Italy)
    Alexander and Cappadocia
    Marek Jan Olbrycht (Poland)
    Alexander the Great in Sittakene and the Reorganization of his Army (331 B.C.)
    Waldemar Heckel (Canada)
    Artabazos in the Lands Beyond the Caspian
    Jeffrey D. Lerner (USA)
    Alexander’s Settlement of the Upper Satrapies in Policy and Practice
    Eduard V. Rtveladze (Uzbekistan)
    Alexander the Great’s Campaign in Basand (Baisun)
    Luis Ballesteros Pastor (Spain)
    Zopyrion’s Scythian Campaign: Historical and Historiographical Problems
    Tomasz Ślęczka (Poland)
    An Ambiguous Hero: Alexander of Macedon in Old Polish Literature: Selected Aspects

  3. #403
    paleologos's Avatar You need burrito love!!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Nice to see that people are still contributing.

  4. #404

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Hello there,

    I am looking to do some preliminary research on the Celto-Iberians. I've had a little look at the secondary sources noted on the front page, but most require financial investment. Are there any websites, or, others resources anyone would recommend?

    Additionally, are there any primary sources, from ancient writers themselves, who address these different tribes?

    Thank you for any information.

  5. #405
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by charlieh View Post
    Hello there,

    I am looking to do some preliminary research on the Celto-Iberians. I've had a little look at the secondary sources noted on the front page, but most require financial investment. Are there any websites, or, others resources anyone would recommend?

    Additionally, are there any primary sources, from ancient writers themselves, who address these different tribes?

    Thank you for any information.
    I think this page (e-Keltoi journal) is a source of good articles on the topic you're interested in.

  6. #406

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by charlieh View Post
    Hello there,

    I am looking to do some preliminary research on the Celto-Iberians. I've had a little look at the secondary sources noted on the front page, but most require financial investment. Are there any websites, or, others resources anyone would recommend?

    Additionally, are there any primary sources, from ancient writers themselves, who address these different tribes?

    Thank you for any information.
    It is not easy to find quality information in English since the last historiographical points of view haven't been translated yet, and it's probable that most of the secondary sources speak about old stereotypes such as the guerrilla warfare, speaking about tribes without taking into account the development of local city-states and their institutions, etc.


    That said, for example, you can find some good papers written in English and for free that take into account the modern bibliography and last theories:

    -The following ones are very useful as summaries of the modern historiographical point of view in regard to the myth of the guerrilla warfare among the Iberian and Celtiberian peoples:

    https://www.academia.edu/735291/_Gue..._against_Rome_

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ellenistic_Age


    -Here you can find a lot of information about the Celtiberian culture. You can download for free about 20 academic papers. I especially suggest reading "War and Society in the Celtiberian World", "The Celts in Iberia: An Overview", "Oppida and Celtic society in western Spain" and "Celtiberian Ideologies and Religion" for those who want to initiate in the knowledge of this culture and know the differences between the Hispano-Celts and the Gauls:

    https://dc.uwm.edu/ekeltoi/vol6/iss1/

    According to primary sources, you could read Polybius and Livy for the Second Punic War and until the Roman civil Wars in Spain, then you have Appian, mainly for the Celtiberian and Lusitanian wars and Strabo that speaks about the different peoples of the Iberian Peninsula. However, IMHO and as a tip, the best option is always to read the secondary sources before the first ones if you are not familiar with a culture/people. initiating yourself in a matter trough primary sources can be difficult and cause misunderstandings. Anyway, Strabo 3.III.1-5 for the Iberian Peninsula:

    http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...rabo/home.html

    EDIT: BTW, If you have some doubts about Celtiberians, feel free to make all the question you have and I will happily reply to you
    Last edited by Trarco; April 14, 2020 at 05:06 AM.

  7. #407

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Thank you Trarco for taking the time to provide and explain these links. I shall get my reading glasses on. I'll let you know if I have any questions.

  8. #408

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    an interesting article on discovery of Hannibal's early battlefield, an early example where his brilliance starts to shine:
    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...bal-180974744/

  9. #409

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    The battlefield of Baecula (the battle of Baecula was an important and decisive Roman victory in the Second Punic War) is also very interesting and much better known:

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...3337B3004E0F5E

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...40618216000392

  10. #410
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    An article of interest for somebody who plays Ptolies: the political situation in the Upper Egypt in these times.

  11. #411
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Few upcoming books:

    Reign of Arrows: The Rise of the Parthian Empire in the Hellenistic Middle East by Nikolaus Leo Overtoom
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    The Army of Ptolemaic Egypt 323 to 204 BC: An Institutional and Operational History by Paul Johstono
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    The Macedonian Phalanx: Equipment, organization and tactics from Philip and Alexander to the Roman conquest by Dr Richard Taylor
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    The Galatians: Celtic Invaders of Greece and Asia Minor by John D Grainger
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

  12. #412
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    For a prospective Pontos players, this book may be published before the 2.35a is published.



    What is commonly called the kingdom of Pontos flourished for over two hundred years in the coastal regions of the Black Sea. At its peak in the early first century BC, it included much of the southern, eastern, and northern littoral, becoming one of the most important Hellenistic dynasties not founded by a successor of Alexander the Great. It also posed one of the greatest challenges to Roman imperial expansion in the east. Not until 63 BC, after many violent clashes, was Rome able to subjugate the kingdom and its last charismatic ruler Mithridates VI.

    This book provides the first general history, in English, of this important kingdom from its mythic origins in Greek literature (e.g., Jason and the Golden Fleece) to its entanglements with the late Roman Republic. Duane Roller presents its rulers and their complex relationships with the powers of the eastern Mediterranean and Near East, most notably Rome. In addition, he includes detailed discussions of Pontos' cultural achievements—a rich blend of Greek and Persian influences — as well as its political and military successes, especially under Mithridates VI, who proved to be as formidable a foe to Rome as Hannibal. Previous histories of Pontos have focused almost exclusively on the career of its last ruler.
    Last edited by Jurand of Cracow; August 03, 2020 at 09:08 AM.

  13. #413

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Does anyone here know of a good read (book or article) on the First Syrian War between Ptolemy Philadelphos and Antiochus? I want to write a prologue chapter for my AAR, centering it on these events, but I don't know where to do some light background research...
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  14. #414

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    For a prospective Pontos players, this book may be published before the 2.35a is published.

    interview with the author of the above:https://www.ancient.eu/article/1568/...-duane-roller/

    Quote Originally Posted by Kilo11 View Post
    Does anyone here know of a good read (book or article) on the First Syrian War between Ptolemy Philadelphos and Antiochus? I want to write a prologue chapter for my AAR, centering it on these events, but I don't know where to do some light background research...
    John Grainger is your guy. very expensive though:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Syrian-Wars-Mnemosyne-Supplements/dp/9004180508

    https://brill.com/view/title/18015

    you can also try his trilogy on the rise and fall of the Seleukids

  15. #415

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    John Grainger is your guy. very expensive though:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Syrian-Wars-Mnemosyne-Supplements/dp/9004180508

    https://brill.com/view/title/18015

    you can also try his trilogy on the rise and fall of the Seleukids
    Expensive indeed, but it looks like a solid one. Thanks for the suggestion Sarkiss, and I will have to consider whether my needs justify such costs...
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  16. #416

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Kilo11 View Post
    Expensive indeed, but it looks like a solid one. Thanks for the suggestion Sarkiss, and I will have to consider whether my needs justify such costs...
    you're welcome. you could go for the second option i suggested and buy the first volume of the trilogy, where the First Syrian War is covered, at a much more reasonable price: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rise-Seleukid-Empire-323-223-BC/dp/1526743760/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+rise+of+seleukid&qid=1597256204&s=books&sr=1-1

    here is the same in ePub format from the pubisher for a fiver: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Rise-of-the-Seleukid-Empire-323223-BC-ePub/p/10039

    good luck

  17. #417

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post

    Armies of the Hellenistic States 323 BC to AD 30: History, Organization and Equipment (Gabriele Esposito)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    i would not recommend this - a very dissapointing book that doesnt deliver what is promised in the title. it is a brief description of histories of successsor states and some of their neighbors. it is not a military history but a rather shallow overview of general history. a far cry from the likes of Nicolas Sekunda and i would not recommend it to my A-level students. in short, the book offers a basic overview of the hellenistic states but you would be better off reading wikipedia, the content is essentially the same but the latter is free. the only positive about this book are the pics of the reenactors in historical gear. immediate refund.
    Last edited by Sarkiss; August 15, 2020 at 04:54 AM.

  18. #418

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    a new installment in The Landmark series - Xenophon's Anabasis - will be published in November 2021 and is now available to pre-order or wishlist: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/03079068...v_ov_lig_dp_it
    next one up should be Polybius.

    for those who dont know, the landmark ancient histories provide the most accessible and comprehensive editions of the ancient primary sources, with detailed maps, annotations, illustrations to make following the text as easy as possible. each volume also includes several appendixes that enrich the knowledge and understanding of the main text/s at hand by providing info on several relevant sub-topics/themes. essentially, these are the best editions the money can buy atm, suitable for anyone from layman to serious students of the period. highy recommended.

  19. #419
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    for those who dont know, the landmark ancient histories provide the most accessible and comprehensive editions of the ancient primary sources, with detailed maps, annotations, illustrations to make following the text as easy as possible. each volume also includes several appendixes that enrich the knowledge and understanding of the main text/s at hand by providing info on several relevant sub-topics/themes. essentially, these are the best editions the money can buy atm, suitable for anyone from layman to serious students of the period. highy recommended.
    If you prefer a bit less accessible language, you may read the classical master's works in Polish in the Fontes Historiae Antiquae series. Just recently books of Diodorus Sicilicus were added - what is much pertintent to EBII, n'est-pas?
    For non-Polish speakers - these books are bilingual, you may also read in Latin or Greek originals

  20. #420

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    by accessible i didnt mean the language per se (though they are english translations) but the way the main text is supported by annotations and visual aids.
    an equivalent to this Polish series would be the bilingual Loeb Classical Library that publishes texts in both english and the original (green cover for greek, red for latin: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Metamorphos...VRTQ4AFG72DYYV)

    good prices though

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