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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #261

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    It's a shame that some of the posts disappeared last winter.
    Mine included a recommendation for "A History of the Hellenistic World, 323-30 BC" by Robert Errington to get a basic overall understanding of the eastern mediterranean during the EB2 period.

  2. #262
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    There is a new book called Cataphracts: Knights of the Ancient Eastern Empires by Pen and Sword Books coming out soon. I hope it will be good read.

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  3. #263
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Another interesting new book called In the Garden of the Gods: Models of Kingship from the Sumerians to the Seleucids.

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  4. #264

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I find the lack of Lugiones/Przeworsk sources in the bibliography disturbing...

    A paper on Przeworsks horse burials and warfare. Very informative.

    http://briai.ku.lt/downloads/AB/11/1...114_Kontny.pdf

    Another one about Oksywie and Przeworsk imported weapons and goods(including swords and even small amounts of chainmail):

    http://briai.ku.lt/downloads/AB/18/1...k,_Herasim.pdf

    A paper about przeworsk shield umbones:

    http://www.archeologia.univ.rzeszow....08_Bochnak.pdf

    An article on a przeworsk parade shield found. Download the full article for free by clicking the links after the "Full text:..." area of the page.

    http://193.219.76.12/index.php/AB/article/view/67

    Archaeologia Baltica seems to be a decent journal for Przeworsk stuff, and the Baltic in general. Found all of these via google scholar. Hope they are up to our standard here, I haven't completely read through all of these yet, but they should be roughly relevant to our time period.


    Thracian stuff(not sure if it's in there already):

    Thracian "dictionary"
    http://www.kroraina.com/thrac_lang/thrac_5.html

    Tombs and things:
    http://home.exetel.com.au/thrace/images/tombs.htm

    http://home.exetel.com.au/thrace/images/kazanluk.htm

    http://home.exetel.com.au/thrace/ima...drovo_tomb.htm

    http://home.exetel.com.au/thrace/images/tombs_main2.htm
    Last edited by Genghis Skahn; October 11, 2016 at 10:36 PM.

  5. #265

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    More Przeworsk(Lugian) stuff:

    This seems to be a really informative source. Simply making a free academia.edu account gave me full access to this book's section solely focused on the Przeworsk culture. There are plenty of informative culture spread maps, and archaeological diagrams of weapon/material finds.

    https://www.academia.edu/4115218/The...-Warszawa_2010

    Seems like this Archaeologist has tons of his personal PDFs on his website. This paper is especially useful because in the first page he states the approximate dating of all Przeworsk phases and their approximate duration. You'd be surprised, but sometimes even simple information like this can be difficult to find in academic sources. I read perhaps 5-6 papers mentioning phase B2 and etc. before I found a single source telling me what those phases exactly meant in terms of time. Some of my previously linked articles are available on his site too(same archaeologist).

    http://bartoszkontny.pradzieje.pl/in...time_of_war_01

    A google book preview focusing on La Tene and Przeworsk strap shield bosses:

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=EOG...ulture&f=false

    Do note that's a Celtic source, but since the Przeworsk culture is heavily influenced by La Tene culture in it's early phases, it's very relevant.

    I should note that the Przeworsk peoples seemed to prefer cremation to inhumation, which can complicate finding grave goods for these peoples.
    Last edited by Genghis Skahn; October 12, 2016 at 06:45 PM.

  6. #266

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Genghis Skahn again."
    Mouzafphaerre, aka Urwendur, Urwendil, Kibilturg, Hayreddin Barbarossa etc.

  7. #267
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I think an article On Location of XI and XV Satrapies of Achaemenid Persia, south of the Caspian Sea, might be of interest and maybe use of somebody at EBII.
    http://www.ihism.uph.edu.pl/images/P...-Khorikyan.pdf

  8. #268
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    The Economy of Late Achaemenid and Seleucid Babyloniay by Reinhard Pirngruber is coming out next year. Published by Cambridge University Press.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

  9. #269
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    New book called Ptolemy I: King and Pharaoh of Egypt by Ian Worthington was released few days ago:

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  10. #270
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    New Grainger´s book called Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World is out:

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  11. #271

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    New Grainger´s book called Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World is out
    thanks for sharing, looks like another interesting work from Grainger. will add it to the list, but my god, the price! its similar to his Syrian Wars, why wouldnt they just print some paperbacks?

    some months ago I've finished Grainger's trilogy on Seleukid empire. the first volume is about the rise of the empire, the second is dedicated entirely to the reign of Antiochus the Great and the final one considers the decline and collapse of the state under the incessant infra-dynastic struggle. a fascinating work in that it tries to give an overview of the entire history of the empire. Grainger proposes some original ideas and sometimes disagrees with conventions (in terms of Seleukid relations with Rome, for instance). Grainger also demonstrates how weakening of the state was caused by the struggle for power within dynasty itself, which was instrumental in ending it. he dedicates some space to city-building initiatives of the early Seleukid rulers - a policy that served to spread and consolidate their power. it is not a military history but a political and dynastic one that also touches upon neighboring regions and communities. it would be good if Grainger could make more use of the Babylonian Chronicles as they become increasingly available and help to shed some light on obscure periods. overall, a highly recommended work to anyone seriously interested in history of Seleukid empire.

    Grainger's Roman Conquests: Egypt and Judea is another great work. a rather detailed story of Roman takeover of Judea, Egypt, but also goes beyond that and give a detailed account of events in Syria. Highly recommended.

    another work i'd recommend is Mayor's Poison King on Mithradates VI Eupator. unfortunately for some, the book is not military nor political history. rather it is a biography and focus is often on the "personal". some space is dedicated to toxicology, something i have no interest in, and there are some inaccuracies and minor mistakes. in her attempts to recreate a plausible reconstruction of some of the obscure periods and episodes, Mayor tends to deviate into the realm of historical fiction at times. overall, however, it is a great work and its main strength lie in Mayor's concerted effort to tell the story from Mithradates point of view. in this, Mayor surpasses other authors (P. Matyszak) in rigor with which she reads primary sources against the grain, scrutinizes and cross references them. On more than one occasion, I found myself fascinated by her conclusions or the perspectives she offers on certain events - a stark contrast with the "lazier" narratives offered by some classicist scholars that sometimes merely accept the biased sources and are often unaware of being trapped within the bubble of the "convention", partial though it often is. a great book for those interested in history of first century BC and especially useful to readers looking for the works that strife to promote an alternative viewpoints and tell the story of the Rome's enemies from their own perspectives.

  12. #272
    Abdülmecid I's Avatar ¡Ay Carmela!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    To be honest, I wasn't really amazed by Grainger's last book about the Seleucid dynasty. Probably nobody denies the crucial role the constant civil wars played to the kingdom's collapse, but, in my opinion, that still doesn't explain their fall, as it poses a new, unanswered question: What led to that sad state of affairs, which is not common in any other Hellenistic political entity?
    However, I completely disagree, in what concerns Mayor's romance story. Better buy something from Penguin Classics. Adrienne is not an expert on Hellenistic studies and it shows, badly... As you also mentioned, a disproportionately large portion of the book is dedicated to the imaginary hunting adventures of Mithradates and his company, which essentially renders the first part of her book nothing more but a fairy tale. Then, some inaccuracies are glaring and completely inexcusable for someone who bothered to write a book about a Hellenistic personality and the supposed standards of Stadford University. Off the top of my head, the author totally forgot the existence of Attalus II, assuming that Attalus III directly succeeded Eumenes II to the Pergamene throne, while she considers the name Tryphon as Jewish, presumably because she mistakenly believes that every Christian name is of Jewish origin. All that, while the Seleucid pretender Diodotus Tryphon is a rather well-known personality for every Hellenistic researcher. Apparently, I would conclude that Adrianne collected every reference to Mithradates' life coming from ancient historical sources (but almost certainly, not archaeological ones), added the necessary oriental-exotic flavour which would make her work financially successful and lazily ignored the context and every other study a bit more remotely related to her preferred topic.

  13. #273

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Abdülmecid I View Post
    To be honest, I wasn't really amazed by Grainger's last book about the Seleucid dynasty. Probably nobody denies the crucial role the constant civil wars played to the kingdom's collapse, but, in my opinion, that still doesn't explain their fall, as it poses a new, unanswered question: What led to that sad state of affairs, which is not common in any other Hellenistic political entity?
    i wouldnt call it uncommon, Ptolemies have similarly tore themselves apart... the answer Grainger offers is that the monarch embodied the single central political institution that unified the realm - L'etat c'est moi of Louis XIV, hence the systemic weakness. and btw, the books (as most titles by Pen & Sword) badly need more maps. and unfortunately they lacks any sort of visual sources/appendixes altogether.

    However, I completely disagree, in what concerns Mayor's romance story. Better buy something from Penguin Classics. Adrienne is not an expert on Hellenistic studies and it shows, badly... As you also mentioned, a disproportionately large portion of the book is dedicated to the imaginary hunting adventures of Mithradates and his company, which essentially renders the first part of her book nothing more but a fairy tale. Then, some inaccuracies are glaring and completely inexcusable for someone who bothered to write a book about a Hellenistic personality and the supposed standards of Stadford University. Off the top of my head, the author totally forgot the existence of Attalus II, assuming that Attalus III directly succeeded Eumenes II to the Pergamene throne, while she considers the name Tryphon as Jewish, presumably because she mistakenly believes that every Christian name is of Jewish origin. All that, while the Seleucid pretender Diodotus Tryphon is a rather well-known personality for every Hellenistic researcher. Apparently, I would conclude that Adrianne collected every reference to Mithradates' life coming from ancient historical sources (but almost certainly, not archaeological ones), added the necessary oriental-exotic flavour which would make her work financially successful and lazily ignored the context and every other study a bit more remotely related to her preferred topic.
    i wouldnt say she ignored other fields or secondary sources, there are references to archeology in Crimea among others. in fact, a better care of choosing those would serve the work better imho - it is way too all encompassing and some of the secondary sources include novels and scholars of questionable reputation. but yes, admittedly, unfortunately there are some shortcoming to her work. what i did like about it, and what outweighs those inaccuracies in my opinion (though doesnt really excuse them), is the angle she takes and an emphasis placed solely on her subject and his perspective. it is also, unlike Grainger's works, written for general public, which makes it more accessible to the wider audience. this is another approach that i approve of as it attracts broader readership which helps to popularise studies of the period and is good for history as a subject in general.

  14. #274

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Haven't read the new book by Grainger, but his other book "Rome, Parthia and India: The Violent Emergence of a New World Order 150-140 BC" does cover how the last dynastic crisis came to be in Syria pretty well...

  15. #275

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by APIOC COYATOYPIKC View Post
    Haven't read the new book by Grainger, but his other book "Rome, Parthia and India: The Violent Emergence of a New World Order 150-140 BC" does cover how the last dynastic crisis came to be in Syria pretty well...
    im intrigued by how he weaves a series of seemingly disparate events into a coherent narrative. very interesting and worth placing on the wish-list. in the meantime, just finished Hellenistic Age by Thonemann. it is a brief introduction to the period with the outline of main events and achievements. a good choice for a lazy weekend read. the downside - a considerable one if one tries to delve deeper into the topics - is a total lack of notes. there is recommended reading but the total lack of foot/end-notes is buffing, especially considering its published by OUP

  16. #276

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I've just looked at the thread and it's full of grat suggestions However, as a poor student I can't afford the +30€ that costs the average book here, and the only free pdfs that I found are scientific papers... can anyone point me in the direction of free (or cheap) books, if there are any? I'm quite open to any faction/conflict, but Iberia, Rome, Carthage, steppe nomads, Greece and the Diadochi kingdoms are preferred

  17. #277

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by moai17 View Post
    I've just looked at the thread and it's full of grat suggestions However, as a poor student I can't afford the +30€ that costs the average book here, and the only free pdfs that I found are scientific papers... can anyone point me in the direction of free (or cheap) books, if there are any? I'm quite open to any faction/conflict, but Iberia, Rome, Carthage, steppe nomads, Greece and the Diadochi kingdoms are preferred
    on the latter, I've just purchased Antigonos the One-Eyed and the Creation of the Hellenistic State on eBay for £4.95. the price on Amazon is around 20 (for a used book). so worth doing your research... even the Amazon though, sometimes offers amazing deals on ex library books that are in a very good state. indeed, there are books for 1p out there and I have a few by Paul Cartledge, Tom Holland (on Sparta etc), where I essentially only paid for delivery.

  18. #278
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    There're always bargains up to 75% on Oxbow: http://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/. You may find something there, always very good academic quality. However, you need to pay postage and the books are still not cheap.
    For those who want to play a historical mod in a medieval setting:
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  19. #279

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    the Landmark Ancient Histories series have finally announced their next publication - the complete works of Julius Caesar. it will be out by the end of the year and can be pre-ordered here (US) and here (UK).

    for those unfamiliar with the Landmark series, they offer the best editions of primary sources money can buy. in terms of supprting maps, footnotes, appendicies (and pretty much everything else) the Landmarks are unparalleled and their editions are by far the most comprehensive and accessible and will serve well to students and neophytes alike:
    The Landmark Ancient Histories feature contemporary translations of classic historians’ writings supported with extensive customized maps, illustrations, and annotations. Marginal notes, dates, and locations are placed side by side with the manuscript in a clear page format to help keep you oriented. Introductions and appendices written by some of today’s leading scholars give insight into politics, culture, warfare, and other subjects pertinent to the ancient texts. Encyclopedic indexes provide cross-references to themes and events throughout the manuscripts.
    The Landmark editions of Thucydides and Herodotus have become the new standard for elegant and accessible editions of classical works.
    here is a talk by Robert B. Strassler, the series editor.

    so far they've published 4 books (i own them all) - Thucydides, Herodotus, Arrian's "Alexander", and Xenophon's "Hellenica" - and Julius Caesar will be next. it will be followed (hopefully) by Anabasis and Polybius. and i hope they'll keep going!
    Last edited by Sarkiss; July 02, 2017 at 10:06 AM.

  20. #280

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Pretty pictures right here folks. Get them while they are fresh.

    https://www.facebook.com/pg/Archaeol...=page_internal
    I recommend a pugio rather than a spear, because in close quarters combat, a dagger will serve you better than a spear.

    Rad, 2016.

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