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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #241
    Boogie Knight's Avatar Biarchus
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    My wife was clearing out her aunt's house and found a copy of Alexander the Great by Robin Lane Fox. She saved it from the charity shop pile because she thought I might like it. I get home, check the bibliography and sure enough, there it is. Another one to tick off once I finish Mary Beard's SPQR!

    Also, for fellow fans of Mary Beard she's got a four-part documentary series starting this Thursday on the BBC. It should be available on iPlayer for non-Britishers. It'd be great to see what you guys make of it.

  2. #242
    Cohors_Evocata's Avatar Ordinarius
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Boogie Knight View Post
    My wife was clearing out her aunt's house and found a copy of Alexander the Great by Robin Lane Fox. She saved it from the charity shop pile because she thought I might like it. I get home, check the bibliography and sure enough, there it is. Another one to tick off once I finish Mary Beard's SPQR!

    Also, for fellow fans of Mary Beard she's got a four-part documentary series starting this Thursday on the BBC. It should be available on iPlayer for non-Britishers. It'd be great to see what you guys make of it.
    Should it? I've been thoroughly dissapointed by the BBC before, they won't allow people outside of Britain to see their documentaries AFAIK. :/
    I tend to edit my posts once or several times after writing and uploading them. Please keep this in mind when reading a recent post of mine. Also, should someone, for some unimaginable reason, wish to rep me, please add your username in the process, so I can at least know whom to be grateful towards.

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  3. #243
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    wander why the publishers decided to make Judaea into a separate from "Syria" volume as it is so intrinsically linked to the Syrian affairs (which Grainger is a specialist on) and lied within its borders. Judaea would have fitted more organically within Syrian narrative imho. considering how thin and shallow the volume on Syria was
    It's very simple, everything has to do with perception and public taste and interest. Egypt is interesting to westerners because of the Pyramids, Alexandrian wonders and Cleopatra and Judea is almost a mythical place due to enormous religious influence it exerted upon the west. Syria, on the other had is... meh. Take Antioch for example, it was a metropolis, one of the largest cities in the world. Chances are if average person knows about it, is because of the Crusades, when city was pretty much a decrepit medium-sized settlement, not hellenistic or roman-era grand megalopolis.

    Just to clarify, by perception I mean perception of importance or perception of what should be common knowledge. In my humble opinion sponsorship of arts, culture and sciences by Ptolemy I and II contributed much more to humanity than the ability of Cleopatra VII to use roman men as pawns against her siblings, yet she is well known, albeit with much inaccuracy, while Ptolemy is just a strange name for the western ears.

    John D. Grainger in his "The Roman war of Antiochos the Great" wrote: "I suggested some years ago to a publisher that a biography of Antiochos the Great might be a good subject for a book the idea was rejected, yet there are biographies of some of the most obscure Roman emperors. So, a king who ruled all the lands from India to Greece for a third of a century is not regarded as a suitable subject, yet the half-mad emperors Nero and Caligula rate repeated study. The effect on world history of these two men must be rated as minimal;" - In the same book: "The study of Carthage, for example, is scarcely a central issue in ancient studies, and even Hellenistic Greece has often been relegated to an appendix of its supposedly glorious "classical" period."

    The point is that percetion of importance is somewhat skewed, ie. Roman Empire - important, Roman Republic - less important, everyone knows of Nero, but Scipio Africanus is unknown to general public, the Cornelii, arguably the most important gens leading to the rise of the Roman Republic as a power beyond Italy.
    Last edited by Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σω April 25, 2016 at 09:52 AM. Reason: Correction of quotes.
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  4. #244

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    except this logic doesnt really work in a profit oriented market environment that capitalises on public taste, interest and perception of importance. why cram both "popular" topics/themes into one volume if you could spread the goodies (Egypt on its own with Arabia etc, Judea with Syria) and supposedly get double the income from both volumes rather then keeping all the eggs in one basket?

    whatever the case, the book is good and Grainger surely knows his stuff inside out (one of the reasons I wish he wrote about Syria).

  5. #245
    Boogie Knight's Avatar Biarchus
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Cohors_Evocata View Post
    Should it? I've been thoroughly dissapointed by the BBC before, they won't allow people outside of Britain to see their documentaries AFAIK. :/
    Oh, that sucks. The only solution I can think of would be use a fake IP service to get yourself a British IP address. It apparently works for Netflix so it might work for the BBC, too.

  6. #246
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    except this logic doesnt really work in a profit oriented market environment that capitalises on public taste, interest and perception of importance. why cram both "popular" topics/themes into one volume if you could spread the goodies
    I have no idea, however the public perception is that Judea and Egypt are more intertwined than Syria and Judea which is somewhat true for earlier periods, and that Syria as a region was always a periphery of some other state, of course calling the Seleucids Syria is wrong in my opinion.

    The other book by Evans "Roman Conquests: Asia Minor, Syria and Armenia" shows that they have decided to group some regions together, rather than "spread the goodies", the thing is that the publishers think that Armenia and Anatolia are more intertwined with Syria, which I don't dispute if they are using chronology of roman conquests.
    Syria and Anatolia were under roman control before Egypt and Judea, so I think they decided to group the two due to chronological proximity of them becoming part of roman state at least in terms of actual occupation. I haven't read that book, so if the book deals with Trajan's conquest of Armenia then my point is invalid.
    Last edited by Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σω April 25, 2016 at 12:30 PM.
    "First get your facts straight, then distort them at your leisure." - Mark Twain

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  7. #247

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    just received my copy of the Poison King and was pleasantly surprised by both the amount and quality of visual sources and aids included in the text. looks great and wish other publishers, especially Pen & Swords with their ever deteriorating quality of maps, would emulated this!

  8. #248

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    just received my copy of the Poison King and was pleasantly surprised by both the amount and quality of visual sources and aids included in the text. looks great and wish other publishers, especially Pen & Swords with their ever deteriorating quality of maps, would emulated this!
    How good is it? Been wanting to find a book on Mithridates. I don't want to read a "story" though, but something that gives some insight into the politics and war in those times

  9. #249

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Anubis88 View Post
    How good is it? Been wanting to find a book on Mithridates. I don't want to read a "story" though, but something that gives some insight into the politics and war in those times
    the books got excellent reviews, and i do not mean the stars given by random amazon readers that are more of an indication of popularity.

    as of those two aspects, imho it is save to assume they are covered to some degree for no biography or a story would be complete without them. Mithridates is one of the last two great Hellenistic kings (the other being Tigran of Armenia) and has numerous important victories not only over his neighbors but also against Romans, something no other Hellenistic king has managed to achieve. not to cover those in at least some detail would be a waste of efford, imho, especially in a work that is over 400 pages long. alternatively, you may consider this pricie exhibit

    i havent got the time to start reading it (way too busy with work, and uni assignments are due for submission soon), but will report back once im done (when im done).

  10. #250
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Also the next issue of AW magazine is about Mithridatic Wars.

    There is a new book about Seleukids coming out soon. Itīs called Seleukid Royal Women: Creation, Representation and Distortion of Hellenistic Queenship in the Seleukid Empire, edited by Altay Coskun and Alex McAuley.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

  11. #251

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Anubis88 View Post
    How good is it? Been wanting to find a book on Mithridates. I don't want to read a "story" though, but something that gives some insight into the politics and war in those times
    Don't buy It. It's assumptive, repetitive and digressive. I bought it, really struggled trough it and finally sold it.

    Maybe harsh but not worth the money

  12. #252

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchhoplite View Post
    Don't buy It. It's assumptive, repetitive and digressive. I bought it, really struggled trough it and finally sold it.

    Maybe harsh but not worth the money
    I love harsh Thanks!

  13. #253
    Sanskrit_Bandit's Avatar Wielki Kniaź Wiślański
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Hey guys question regarding the Los Celtiberos book. Does anyone know where to get the second part of it? The link on the last page for chapter 4 just throws you back to the first page of the document.

  14. #254
    Boogie Knight's Avatar Biarchus
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Just reserved A History of the Ptolemaic Empire at the library (where I'm doing all my work while I wait for my laptop to be repaired). This list is so damn useful to have; thank you for assembling it/making it available!

  15. #255

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I'll recommend Rise of the Greeks and The Phoenicians: Purple Empire of the Ancient World for the list. The former is pretty dry and reviews the entire Archaic Greek world region by region, so it's good for people who are already well-read on classical Greece. The latter is for anybody; very easy to read.
    Last edited by Warpus; June 03, 2016 at 05:12 AM.

  16. #256
    Boogie Knight's Avatar Biarchus
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Warpus View Post
    I'll recommend Rise of the Greeks and The Phoenicians: Purple Empire of the Ancient World for the list. The former is pretty dry and reviews the entire Archaic Greek world region by region, so it's good for people who are already well-read on classical Greece. The latter is for anybody; very easy to read.
    Thank you for the recommendations! I've just now reserved the latter. I'd been trying to find one on the Carthaginians or Phoenicians in general for a while now, but none of the libraries in the county I live in had anything on the bibliography; this one, however, they do seem to have one copy of. Rise of the Greeks will have to wait; I'm not nearly well-versed enough in ancient Greece to take on something like that, yet, but it's good to know for when I am. Thanks again!

  17. #257

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Glad to be of service. (No hat tipping emoticon? Argh!)

  18. #258

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Anyone with thoughts on Adrian Goldsworthy's "Antony and Cleopatra"? Just picked it up and wanted to get through it before a walking trip to Hadrian's Wall this summer - led by Professor Goldsworthy!

  19. #259
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Another new book about Seleukids coming out this year. Itīs called Kings and Usurpers in the Seleukid Empire: The Men who would be King by Boris Chrubasik (Oxford University Press).

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

  20. #260

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Seems like an OK place to post this link.

    https://www.facebook.com/Balkancelts/photos
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