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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #221

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    http://www.despertaferro-ediciones.c...ua-y-medieval/ This is what i was talking about. It puts those magazines to shame from the looks of it. I've seen some screens of the things inside. So many city reconstructions, siege reconstructions, army reconstructions etc... These magazines look like just focusing on the late empire mostly.

  2. #222
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Anubis88 View Post
    http://www.despertaferro-ediciones.c...ua-y-medieval/ This is what i was talking about. It puts those magazines to shame from the looks of it. I've seen some screens of the things inside. So many city reconstructions, siege reconstructions, army reconstructions etc... These magazines look like just focusing on the late empire mostly.
    I know about this magazine. I donīt speak Spanish, so I didnīt read it. But Iīm a long time reader of posted AW magazine an the magazine cover all Ancient periods. also as a reader you can propose themes and articles. They have great customer service.

  3. #223

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    half way through the Roman Conquests: Asia Minor, Syria and Armenia. Must say Evans' ignorance and confusion on Armenia are truly shocking. an average EB player probably knows more on the topic. He also takes an opposite to Grainger's view of Antiochus Megas - there is nothing Megas about him at all. overall, it is a Roman-centric account that rarely questions the primary Roman sources on certain aspects and provides a rather lengthy quotes to reinforce his main line of argument that focuses on the superiority of the SPQR. more balanced approach would be more beneficial imho. in general, it is shame they (Pen&Sword) did not let Grainger, specialist on the Seleukids, write this volume (he wrote the one of Egypt and Judea instead).
    Not only that but he also misses the whole Galatian campaign and the Eumenes III/ Aristonicus affair.

    By far the worst of the series

  4. #224
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchhoplite View Post
    Not only that but he also misses the whole Galatian campaign and the Eumenes III/ Aristonicus affair.

    By far the worst of the series
    Very interesting approach Itīs a big miss with this title, because itīs a very interesting and important theme.

    Something similar to book posted by Μαυρίκιος Τιβέριος: Ancient Antioch - From the Seleucid Era to the Islamic Conquest by Cambridge University Press (available from June 2016).


  5. #225

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    Just finished reading the excellent The Ghosts of Cannae by Robert L. O'Connell. Can anyone recommend a similar book that focuses on the First Punic War?

  6. #226

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    Quote Originally Posted by shiraio View Post
    Just finished reading the excellent The Ghosts of Cannae by Robert L. O'Connell. Can anyone recommend a similar book that focuses on the First Punic War?
    Dexter Hoyos is one of the biggest names when it comes to Carthage and wrote and edited several great works.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchhoplite View Post
    Not only that but he also misses the whole Galatian campaign and the Eumenes III/ Aristonicus affair.

    By far the worst of the series
    disappointing, really. the book is rather "thin". the author did not only ignore the great modern scholarship on the Asian realms but, perhaps more surprising, did not bother with all the available ancient sources either, i.e. no reference to Cassius Dio or Diodotus at all. i had an impression that the author just doesnt have deep enough knowledge and the volume was written in a rash.

  7. #227
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Genava View Post
    In French about the continental celts:
    - Les Gaulois en guerre, Alain Deyber
    - Guerre et armement chez les Gaulois, Jean-Louis Brunaux et Bernard Lambot
    - Le guerrier gaulois, Franck Mathieu
    - Les Celtes - histoire et dictionnaire, Venceslas Kruta

    If I may add this

    -"Armement et auxiliaires gaulois(IIeme et Ier sičcle avant notre čre)", Lionel Pernet

    Like means the title, its specifically about Celtic auxiliaries.
    Its available on internet btw.

    https://hal.inria.fr/file/index/doci...s_gaulois_.pdf


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  8. #228
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Went to the library today for some completely unrelated books. They didn't have anything I was after but they did have Roman Warfare by Adrian Goldsworthy. Military history isn't normally my thing but I thought I'd give it a go. Took it out, immediately check the bibliography for EBII and whaddaya know? There it is!

    Has anyone had a chance to check out SPQR by Mary Beard yet? I know she's done a few books on the subject/era but I've never read any. It's a new one (not even available on Amazon yet, apparently) but I've seen it in Waterstones and it was there in the library, too. Anyone know if it's worth a look?

  9. #229

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Boogie Knight View Post
    Went to the library today for some completely unrelated books. They didn't have anything I was after but they did have Roman Warfare by Adrian Goldsworthy. Military history isn't normally my thing but I thought I'd give it a go. Took it out, immediately check the bibliography for EBII and whaddaya know? There it is!

    Has anyone had a chance to check out SPQR by Mary Beard yet? I know she's done a few books on the subject/era but I've never read any. It's a new one (not even available on Amazon yet, apparently) but I've seen it in Waterstones and it was there in the library, too. Anyone know if it's worth a look?
    M. Beard is one of the UK's leading specialists on the subject. its her latest work afaik but it is on Amazon and was on offer for quite a while. i had a brief look at it in the Waterstones and from a quick read that I've had, i'd say it is a beautifully written and informative work. i'd definitely recommend it.

  10. #230

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    I just recently read SPQR and found a whole new perspective on the foundation and growth of Rome as a City-State - from the point of view of the average citizen rather than just the consuls, generals, and 'famous folk' we've all heard about for all our lives. She basically gives voice to the eternal question - "Why Rome?"

  11. #231

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timidus View Post
    I just recently read SPQR and found a whole new perspective on the foundation and growth of Rome as a City-State - from the point of view of the average citizen rather than just the consuls, generals, and 'famous folk' we've all heard about for all our lives. She basically gives voice to the eternal question - "Why Rome?"
    'history from below.' it has been in vogue in academia for a number of years, and is steadily trickling down to the 'mainstream' history, at least here in the UK.

  12. #232
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Well, that's settled then. I'll be making a reservation forthwith! Thank you, gentlemen.

  13. #233

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    Read this book recently; Hannibals dynasty from Dexter Hoyos - http://www.amazon.com/Hannibals-Dyna.../dp/0415359589

    A really fun read of the Barcids if anyone's interested. Also the author seems to know what his talking about and likes sharing his opinion and argument it. A quick example; in most books it's mentioned how Hannibal not attacking Rome after Cannae can be excused, while Hoyos believes this to be a big mistake and serious miscalculation on Hannibals part.

    Also read Carthage must be Destroyed by Miles; quite a nice book as well, but really more of an overview then anything too detailed.

  14. #234
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Anubis88 View Post
    Read this book recently; Hannibals dynasty from Dexter Hoyos - http://www.amazon.com/Hannibals-Dyna.../dp/0415359589

    A really fun read of the Barcids if anyone's interested. Also the author seems to know what his talking about and likes sharing his opinion and argument it. A quick example; in most books it's mentioned how Hannibal not attacking Rome after Cannae can be excused, while Hoyos believes this to be a big mistake and serious miscalculation on Hannibals part.

    Also read Carthage must be Destroyed by Miles; quite a nice book as well, but really more of an overview then anything too detailed.
    Thanks for the info, I read few chapters and I like the book

    I found an interesting book, which is on my wishlist now, called Commagene: The Land of Gods between Taurus and Euphrates by M. Blomer and E. Winter.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Last edited by tomySVK; April 06, 2016 at 04:19 AM. Reason: Spelling mistake

  15. #235

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Thanks for the info, I read few chapters and I like the book

    I found an interesting book, which is on my wishlist now, called Commagene: The Land of Gods between Taurus and Euphrates by M. Blomer and E. Winter.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    thanks for sharing. an interesting book, will look it up as im interested in Yervanduni monuments on mount Nemrut.
    here is one on Tsopk (Sophene) edited by Prof Richard Hovannisian. need to order both of them, actully, plus get one on Pokr Hayk (Lesser Armenia).
    thanks again

  16. #236
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    thanks for sharing. an interesting book, will look it up as im interested in Yervanduni monuments on mount Nemrut.
    here is one on Tsopk (Sophene) edited by Prof Richard Hovannisian. need to order both of them, actully, plus get one on Pokr Hayk (Lesser Armenia).
    thanks again
    This also looks very interesting

    I really want to now about this little Hellenistic kingdoms from late period I was re-reading Josephus Flavius and the passage about the charge of Antiochos IV of Commagene Macedonians always catch my imagination

  17. #237

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    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    This also looks very interesting

    I really want to now about this little Hellenistic kingdoms from late period I was re-reading Josephus Flavius and the passage about the charge of Antiochos IV of Commagene Macedonians always catch my imagination
    yes, i remember reading about that charge im generally fascinated with these hybrid kingdoms (Antiochus was of Greek, Armenian and apparently Median descend) with a mix of eastern and Hellenistic cultures. of these Commagene was one of the last ones to survive semi-independently before being swallowed by Rome.

  18. #238
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    yes, i remember reading about that charge im generally fascinated with these hybrid kingdoms (Antiochus was of Greek, Armenian and apparently Median descend) with a mix of eastern and Hellenistic cultures. of these Commagene was one of the last ones to survive semi-independently before being swallowed by Rome.
    Yes, you are absolutely right. What is also very interesting in Commagene case that the kingdomīs military was very capable. When Vespasianus decided to annex the kingdom, governor of Syria invaded with legio VI Ferrata and Roman regular auxiliary units and with units of other client kings. Commagene army led by sons of Antiochos IV fought the day long battle with Roman army and they were not routed by Roman army. The army break only when the troops found that Antiochos IV abandoned Commagene.

  19. #239

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Yes, you are absolutely right. What is also very interesting in Commagene case that the kingdomīs military was very capable. When Vespasianus decided to annex the kingdom, governor of Syria invaded with legio VI Ferrata and Roman regular auxiliary units and with units of other client kings. Commagene army led by sons of Antiochos IV fought the day long battle with Roman army and they were not routed by Roman army. The army break only when the troops found that Antiochos IV abandoned Commagene.
    the bottom line, I think, is that ever since Marius' reforms, Roman army was a professional force. as such it is hardly surprising to see them sweeping their opponents aside, for these opponents were anything but professional - often a handful of militarised nobility whose individual military prowess was of limited use in a large scale pitched battle. these nobility was then reinforced by the ill motivated and ill disciplined levies who formed the majority of the army. against these Romans had their highly disciplined and drilled professional soldiery that was beefed up by the best of what allies and clients could offer - also in essence semi-professional/professional corps. and there is of course the seemingly inexhaustible reservoir of manpower combined with an unprecedented for a sedentary non-migrating community militarisation of a Roman society as a whole (Sparta aside, though its manpower did not come even close to Rome's). that said, they did not have it go their way all the time, of course, and we need to be more critical when relying on Roman sources that often turn inconclusive engagements and draws into victories. but such well oiled military institution relieved some of the pressure from the leadership and meant that a commander of an average ability was most of the time more than adequate to guarantee success of a military enterprise. and there is also the question of uncertainty for many a campaign and battle on the sizes of the Roman fielded armies because it is the number of the legions that authors focus on paying little attention to the accompanying auxiliaries and allies who often made up another 50% of the force. this means the Romans often roughly matched their opponents or were outnumbered by a much lesser degree than we are led to believe by the Romans who tell the story (look at Lucullus' and Ceasar's inflated account of the sizes of their enemies' hosts for instance).

    probably the only military that would have a great chance of taking on and defeating the Romans in a conventional field battle would be that of the successors, imho, whose armies were also largely made up of professionalised (if not professional) cadres. by the time the Romans came into the contact with the latter, however, these lost their edge in terms of leadership and numbers. although more tactically flexible and autonomous in terms of command structure Roman army would be an an advantage. still, when phalanx is deployed to its strengths, is of sufficient numbers and is accompanied by the adequately sized cavalry "hammer" they would be more than capable of defeating the Romans, i believe.

  20. #240

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    finished Roman Conquests: Egypt and Judaea by Grainger. he goes beyond these areas and touches on attempted conquest (?) of Arabia and thrusts into Kush. wander why the publishers decided to make Judaea into a separate from "Syria" volume as it is so intrinsically linked to the Syrian affairs (which Grainger is a specialist on) and lied within its borders. Judaea would have fitted more organically within Syrian narrative imho. considering how thin and shallow the volume on Syria was, perhaps it would have been better to include Judaea there (and let Grainger write it) and leave Egypt, Kush and Arabia for a separate book.

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