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Thread: Diamat's Cooking Thread (New Chapter!)

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    Icon1 Diamat's Cooking Thread (New Chapter!)

    Diamat's Cooking Thread


    Welcome to my special cooking thread. Here I will periodically (every month or so) add a recipe I have tried out. I am not a cook. I am just as much a noob as most of you. Therefore, I will try to make things simple. In fact, I will tell you about my mistakes and what I think could be done better. Recipes will usually be about foods I enjoy the most. However, you are welcome to share some homemade recipes with me and I might try them out, since I am especially interested in homemade cuisine from foreign countries.


    Please share your thoughts on my endeavors and maybe try out some of my recipes. Feedback is always appreciated.


    Table of Contents
    1. German Noodle Broth with Chicken Legs
    2. Saxon "Prinz Albert" Tomato Salad
    3. German Cabbage Rolls with Salt Potatoes
    4. Texas Cheeseball
    5. Schnitzel
    Last edited by Diamat; August 22, 2012 at 09:05 AM.

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread



    Introduction

    Description
    Given that this meal represents my favorite meal in the whole wide world, I could think of no better way to start this project. Growing up in rural East Germany, I came to love simple, yet natural food, which I now find lacking living in the flavor-addicted country of the United States. Indeed, this meal is not very difficult to make. It is simple yet hearty. You will enjoy the flavor of egg noodles soaked in homemade broth and supplemented with tender chicken legs, whose meat falls right off the bones. The recipe was given to me by my grandmother. Her cooking skills are divine. Divine I say!

    Level of Difficulty
    Easy

    Approximate Cost
    24 American Dollars

    Serves
    4-6 people

    Ingredients
    -1 bag of German egg noodles (you may use slightly less if only 4 people; in the United States, you can usually purchase this at Tom Thumb stores)
    -5-6 chicken legs (you may add more if you prefer meat over noodles)
    -1 German onion (=1/2 of an American huge onion)
    -1 carrot
    -1 small chunk of celery root (if unavailable, you may replace with 1 celery stock)
    -1/4 of peeled kohlrabi
    -Parsley (as much as you like; added at very end)
    -salt
    -pepper


    Steps

    Broth and Chicken
    1. Put all the green-colored ingredients into one pot. Add 3 teaspoons of salt (be generous) and a little bit of pepper.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Add water until all chicken legs are completely covered (if 6 people, add just a little bit more, to ensure you will have enough broth; you can always add a little bit more anyway; it is better to have more than not enough)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    3. Bring to a boil.
    4. Keep on low heat for approx. 1-1:30 hours.
    5. You will know it is done when you start to see the skin receding from the bone tip.

    Noodles
    1. Bring water to a boil in a separate pot (you should do this right before you plan to start eating, since this does not take very long).
    2. Add noodles.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    3. Add 4 teaspoons of salt (be generous).
    4. Boil noodles without a lid for a maximum of 10 minutes.

    5. Drain

    Allow each party to add parsley to their own liking. Enjoy.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Final Thoughts
    Salt is very important for this meal. It brings out the flavor. Therefore, not putting in the prescribed amount will result in less taste. You might want to add more to accommodate your personal preferences.



    Last edited by Diamat; June 12, 2013 at 02:07 PM.

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    3. German Cabbage Rolls with Salt Potatoes
    (Deutsche Krautroulade mit Salzkartoffeln)



    Introduction

    Description
    Welcome to the third chapter of Diamat’s Cooking Thread. Today we will be preparing another so-called “poor people’s meal.” Nevertheless, this does not detract from its amazing taste. It is a very common German meal (after all, we Germans do like our “Kraut”) and is not too hard to make, although it will require a little more work than what was presented in the preceding chapters. I truly hope you will enjoy the taste of this tender, sweetly spiced meat wrapped in soft, yet firm, juicy cabbage, all topped with a tasty, savory sauce, and served with a side of German salt potatoes. Trust me: it’s worth the pungent cabbage smell.

    Level of Difficulty
    Medium

    Approximate Cost
    15 American Dollars

    Serves
    3-4 people

    Ingredients
    -16oz (450g) of ground pork
    -1 fresh cabbage
    -4-5 well-sized potatoes (adjust potato amount as you see fit)
    -1 egg
    -1 onion
    -1 loaf of potato bread or 1 bun (I used potato bread)
    -toothpicks or some other type of stick in order to hold together the rolls (I used metal sticks)
    -Sweet paprika powder (make sure it is “sweet”!)
    -Pepper
    -Salt
    -Cooking butter/margarine or olive oil (I used butter)
    -Meat bouillon (I used chicken flavor)
    -Soßenbinder (= gravy thickener; gravy maker); note: I used the German version, which I bought in a special German store here in the US of A (see picture below); please let me know if you find a good equivalent in your home country and what it is called, so that I can add it to this recipe
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    -Optional: ground nutmeg and/or ground caraway (I only added some ground nutmeg)


    Steps

    Preparing the Cabbage
    1. Boil the cabbage on low for 3-5 minutes (this is to make the cabbage easier to work with later)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Take it out of the pot and allow the cabbage to cool

    Preparing the Meat
    1. Put the meat in a bowl
    2. Add 1 egg
    3. Add 1 handful of chopped onions (adjust if necessary)
    4. Soak 1 loaf of potato bread (or the insides of a bun) in water for about 3-5 minutes
    5. Add the soaked loaf into the mixing bowl
    6. Add 1 full tablespoon of paprika powder
    7. Add salt and pepper as you desire
    Optional: add some ground nutmeg and/or ground caraway (I added some ground nutmeg)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    8. Mix everything with hands until even throughout
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Preparing the Cabbage Rolls
    1. Once the cabbage has cooled down, carve out some of the cabbage stem by circling around it with a knife
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Pull the leaves off gently; because you have carved out part of the stem, they should come off more easily; make sure you start pulling from the stem, or your leaf might tear!
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    3. Once the leaves become hard to pull off, you must cut even deeper into the stem and carve out more; then pull off more leaves
    4. Put approx. one handful of meat mix into a leaf, then wrap it closed; subsequently, wrap one or two more leaves around it (usually you only need one extra leaf, but as you near the end of the cabbage, the leaves get smaller, meaning that you might need two extra leaves)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    5. Put sticks into the roll to hold it together
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    6. Repeat until you are out of meat mix; this recipe usually makes 5-6 cabbage rolls
    7. Sauté the rolls in either butter/margarine or olive oil until brown on each side (it is recommended that you do this in the same pot that you will use later to boil your rolls)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    8. Sauté about one handful of onions in either butter/margarine or olive oil
    9. Put the cabbage rolls and the onions all into one pot; add water until the cabbage rolls are almost fully covered
    10. Bring to a boil
    11. Add approx. 2 teaspoons of meat bouillon (I used chicken flavor)
    12. Taste sauce; add spices if necessary
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    13. Boil on low heat for approx. 40 minutes
    14. Right before done, add Soßenbinder (= gravy thickener; gravy maker)

    Preparing the Potatoes
    1. Please note that the potatoes only take about 20 minutes to boil, so plan accordingly. Because it takes 40 minutes to boil the cabbage rolls, after 20 minutes of boiling the cabbage rolls, you should start boiling the potatoes.
    2. Peel the potatoes
    3. Cut them into pieces as shown in the picture below
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    4. Put them in a separate pot
    5. Add water until potatoes are fully covered, no more, no less
    6. Dampen the lid of the pot you are using to boil the potatoes in with water; then generously smear salt over the lid (be very generous), so that the salt sticks to the lid; this will ensure that your potatoes will be salted evenly and gives them a special flavor; if you like your potatoes a little saltier, you may add some extra salt straight into the pot
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    7. Put the lid on the pot so that the pot is completely closed
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    8. Boil the potatoes for 20 minutes (note: the stove top might start showing white stains everywhere around the pot; this is normal; it’s only dried salt; you can easily wipe it away with water after you are done cooking)

    And you are done! When serving, be sure to take out the sticks for the kids, in order to prevent choking. Pour the sauce over your cabbage rolls or potatoes (savor the sauce!). Also, feel free to adjust ingredients to meet your own taste. Enjoy.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 





    Last edited by Jom; June 21, 2012 at 04:56 PM.

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    4. Texas Cheeseball


    Introduction

    Description
    Unlike the previous chapters, this chapter will dive into American cuisine. Now, although it is commonly thought that Americans only eat fast food or that they have no culture, this recipe will demonstrate the contrary. American cuisine is indeed varied, but this is a good thing. We will take our first steps into this mysterious field with a simple recipe. Not many people would consider this “American.” They have a point. It can be an incredibly vexing task to trace the origins of American foods (just look at the hamburger problem). But it is exactly America’s eclecticism which makes her interesting in both culture and food. The same goes for this recipe. Although I have termed it “Texas Cheeseball,” I am unsure of its exact origins. It is a family recipe handed down to my wife, who is Texan. Upon first tasting this cheeseball, I was taken by surprise. “How can American food taste so good yet be so light?” Well, it apparently can. I hope you will find this food just as surprising and enjoyable as I did. Served with crackers, it is suitable for any occasion and tends to be a “party hit.” I would especially recommend combining the cheeseball with a French dinner and a good selection of wines. Enjoy.

    Level of Difficulty
    Easy

    Approximate Cost
    15 American Dollars

    Serves
    Many people (makes one cheeseball)

    Ingredients
    -12 oz. of cream cheese
    -4 oz. (drained weight) of canned sliced mushrooms
    -4.25 oz. of chopped olives
    -2 oz. of chopped pecans or walnuts (I used pecans)
    -3 green onions
    -1.25 oz. of dried beef
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    -Accent Salt, otherwise known as MSG (Monosodium Glutamate)
    -Worcestershire Sauce


    Steps


    You will need two separate mixing bowls.


    Bowl 1
    1. Drain mushrooms and olives from the can
    2. Chop the mushrooms in an electric chopper and then put them into the bowl
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    3. Add the chopped olives to the bowl (if olives are not pre-chopped, chop them like you did in the previous step)
    4. Chop the green onions in the chopper and add them to the bowl
    5. Chop the dried beef in the chopper and add it to the bowl
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    6. Mix everything
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Bowl 2
    1. Put the cream cheese into a bowl and let it come to room temperature (so that it will be softer to work with)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Once the cream cheese is ready, add one tablespoon of Accent Salt to the bowl
    3. Add one dash of Worcestershire Sauce
    4. Mix contents
    5. Add contents of Bowl 1 to Bowl 2
    6. Add the nuts
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    7. Mix contents
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    8. Put contents into a suitable rounded bowl (this will be the shape of the cheeseball when it is done); press the contents in and smoothen out the surface with a spoon
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    9. Cover the bowl with aluminum foil; put the bowl into the fridge overnight
    Optional: you can also serve it the same day if you cool it quickly
    10. Next day, before you serve the cheeseball, flip the bowl onto a plate; the cheeseball should come out; if it does not, use a knife to cut around the edges of the bowl, in order to loosen the cheeseball
    11. Serve with crackers of your choice

    Enjoy!
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 





    Last edited by Diamat; July 22, 2012 at 09:41 AM.

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    2. Saxon "Prinz Albert" Tomato Salad
    (Sächsischer "Prinz Albert" Tomatensalat)



    Introduction

    Description
    Continuing the trend of how to easily make simple, yet delicious food, I have decided to feature, as our second recipe, what I have dubbed “Saxon ‘Prinz Albert’ Tomato Salad.” You may wonder why I have called it “Prinz Albert.” The reason is rather simple. The name refers to the Saxon Prinz Albert cavalry regiment, which typically wore red and green uniforms, reminiscent of the coloring of this tomato salad. I also dubbed it this way because this salad is slightly different from the tomato salad in other regions of Germany. For example, this salad will include no basil! All the ingredients are very basic and cheap, ingredients typically found in your everyday garden. No need for silly store-bought salad dressing, when the salad creates its own dressing! My grandma prepared this salad often. It is a classic “rural” salad, a very zesty one at that, which is best combined with German dark rye bread, cold cuts, and of course a good Pilsner. So what are you waiting for? Enjoy this easy-to-make Saxon tomato salad!

    Level of Difficulty
    Easy

    Approximate Cost
    4 American Dollars

    Serves
    2 people

    Ingredients
    -3 American medium-sized tomatoes (this typically equates 4-5 medium-sized European tomatoes; you are best off buying tomatoes which still have their vines attached, which results in more flavor)
    -1/4 to 1/3 of a medium-sized onion (adjust according to your personal preferences; however, it is typical for this salad to have a lot of “zest” to it, so be generous on onions)
    -a fingertip of sugar
    -1 teaspoon of salt
    -2 tablespoons of vegetable oil
    -Pepper
    -Chives (German: Schnittlauch)
    -Optional: Parsley


    Steps

    1. Cut each tomato into four equally sized sides. Subsequently, cut each of those four sides in half, leaving you with 8 pieces per tomato. Be sure to cut out the hard parts near the stem, as shown in the picture below. Throw the tomatoes into a mixing bowl.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Chop the onion and throw it into the mixing bowl.
    3. Chop the chives and throw them into the mixing bowl. Note: there is no prescribed amount of chives you should use. It is really up to you. Personally, I add a full hand of chopped chives. This recipe is so fool-proof that you do not need to rigidly adhere to every suggestion.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    4. Add a fingertip-amount of sugar to the bowl
    5. Add 1 teaspoon of salt
    6. Add 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil
    7. Pepper generously (again, there is no prescribed amount; still, it is good to be generous on the pepper, because this salad is supposed to have a lot of “zest”)
    8. Optional: add a little bit of parsley (approx. ¼ the amount of chives you added)
    9. Mix everything. It is recommended you do this with your bare hands (make sure you wash them prior to mixing). This is how professionals often do it as well. It allows for a better mixing while obviating a potential breaking of the tomatoes. Be gentle.
    10. Taste. If necessary, add sugar, salt, or pepper.
    11. Once done, put foil over your mixing bowl and place it in your refrigerator for 30 minutes or longer. This will allow for all the spices and onion/chive flavors to be absorbed by the tomatoes, creating an aromatic, “natural” salad dressing. It will also make the “sauce” on the bottom more delicious. If in a rush, of course, you may serve right away. Indeed, this recipe contains a “natural” dressing. Do not add any other salad dressing to it!

    Serve and enjoy. Savor the sauce!
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


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    Introduction

    Description
    It’s finally here! Due to popular demand, I have decided to make the fifth chapter about a rather well-known German meal, Schnitzel. Once you know the steps and the few little quirks involved, it’s rather easy to prepare, especially in terms of the few ingredients required. For this recipe, considering other people’s diets and religious restrictions, I have decided to make Hühnerschnitzel (Chicken Schnitzel), instead of pork or veal Schnitzel. It is not only easier to make than the others, but its taste is just as great. You may substitute, if you so desire, for pork or veal, but it may make the meat-beating process more complicated. But if you are an experienced cook, it should not be a problem for you. As sides, I have chosen German salt potatoes and cauliflower (Blumenkohl), since those two are the traditional sides in my native region. Do not expect this meal to be awfully healthy. It involves lots of margarine, but this is exactly what makes it taste so great. After all, who can say "no" to tender, well-spiced, breaded chicken breast roasted in buttery sauce? Thus, I hope you enjoy this meal with company, for there is hardly a person who will not like it.

    Level of Difficulty
    Easy

    Approximate Cost
    20 American Dollars

    Serves
    3

    Ingredients
    -3 fresh chicken breasts
    -1 cauliflower
    -potatoes
    -2 eggs
    -flour
    -bread crumbs
    -ca. 10-12 tablespoons of margarine (yes, you will need a lot of margarine)
    -lemon juice (you can preferably use a fresh lemon too)
    -salt
    -pepper
    -sweet paprika powder (make sure it is “sweet”!)
    -1 Ziploc bag
    -Optional: parsley and/or chives


    Steps

    Preparing the Schnitzel
    1. Prepare the ingredients needed for the breading process. As shown in the picture below, set up the three plates in the order in which the breading process occurs, that is, first the flour, then the battered egg (make sure you batter the egg), and finally the bread crumbs
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Put one chicken breast into a Ziploc bag and close the bag
    3. Beat your meat (I had to say it ) with the flat side of your beating device. Be sure to not use the spikey ends, because doing so would result in an escape of meat juices, thus making the Schnitzel rather dry in the end. Beat until thin throughout (this will ensure crispiness; it is also important to be thin for the purpose of getting the meat to roast properly without any remaining raw parts)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    4. Take the meat out of the bag and cut off the bad ends
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    5. Spice the meat with salt, pepper, and sweet paprika powder. Flip and spice the other side just the same
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    6. Before starting the breading process, heat the pan until the butter is melted
    7. Pull the chicken breast through all three ingredients (on both sides) in the order listed under step 1. Make sure the meat is fully covered in bread crumbs (push it into the crumbs). Warning: only perform this process on one chicken breast at a time! Do not do the others until you are ready to put them into the pan. Since there is usually only space for one per pan, you will have to get one done roasting first before starting the next. If you bread the others too early, the breading will fall off the Schnitzel as you roast it in the pan
    8. Put the breaded chicken breast into the already-hot frying pan. The Schnitzel should be swimming in melted, bubbling margarine. Roast the Schnitzel on medium heat
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    9. Turn the Schnitzel around after ca. 5 minutes (make sure it has the distinct golden-brown color), and add some more margarine into the pan. Roast on medium heat (same as before)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    10. Repeat steps 7-9 for each chicken breast. After each Schnitzel is fried, you will have to add more margarine

    Preparing the Potatoes
    Notice that this is exactly the same process as shown in Chapter 3.
    1. Please note that the potatoes take about 20 minutes to boil, so plan accordingly.
    2. Peel the potatoes
    3. Cut them into pieces as shown in the picture below
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    4. Put them in a separate pot
    5. Add water until potatoes are fully covered, no more, no less
    6. Dampen the lid of the pot you are using to boil the potatoes in with water; then generously smear salt over the lid (be very generous), so that the salt sticks to the lid; this will ensure that your potatoes will be salted evenly and gives them a special flavor; if you like your potatoes a little saltier, you may add some extra salt straight into the pot
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    7. Put the lid on the pot so that the pot is completely closed
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    8. Boil the potatoes for 20 minutes (note: the stove top might start showing white stains everywhere around the pot; this is normal; it’s only dried salt; you can easily wipe it away with water after you are done cooking)

    Preparing the Cauliflower
    1. Cut the cauliflower into little pieces as shown in the picture below and put them in a pot with water (it would probably be best to prepare this ahead of time)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Bring the cauliflower to a boil. Note that the cauliflower only takes about 10 minutes to boil, so plan accordingly
    3. Once done, pour the water away and put the boiled cauliflower into a bowl
    4. Put 2-3 tablespoons of real butter (not margarine) into the pot you just earlier used for the cauliflower
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    5. Melt it. Once molten, add some bread crumbs and mix them with the butter on low heat
    6. Pour the mixture over the cauliflower
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Preparing the Sauce
    1. Note that this occurs after the Schnitzel is done (and no longer in the pan). Depending on the amount of guests you have, put plenty of margarine into the frying pan you used earlier to make the Schnitzel in
    2. Melt it
    3. Add salt, pepper, lemon juice, and a shot of red wine
    4. Stir
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Done! When serving, optionally, garnish the Schnitzel with lemon and parsley and/or chives. It is common to pour lemon juice over your Schnitzel. Allow guests to pour the sauce over their Schnitzel/potatoes/cauliflower as they desire. Most importantly, enjoy.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Last edited by Diamat; August 22, 2012 at 09:04 AM. Reason: DIAMAT

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    6. Saxon Cucumber Salad
    (Sächsischer Gurkensalat)



    Introduction

    Description
    Glück auf! Today, liebe Genossen, I present to you a dish that is very dear to me. It is incredibly cheap, easy to make, and most importantly, delicious. It is a cucumber salad using the simplest of ingredients. One can easily mix things up, change ingredients, or the amounts used of each ingredient, without ruining the salad. Hence, I encourage you to experiment to meet your own personal tastes. As a result, this salad will appeal to people from different cultures. I would love to see pictures of your own cultural variations of this dish.

    Level of Difficulty
    Easy

    Approximate Cost
    Too cheap

    Serves
    1-2

    Ingredients
    -1 cucumber
    -Onion
    -Fresh dill (must be fresh, not dried dill)
    -Fresh garlic
    -Sour cream
    -Salt, pepper, and sugar


    Steps

    1. Cut the cucumbers into thin slices. I do not recommend that you grind the cucumbers, since this would result in a rather spongy salad in the end, which does not look too appealing.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    2. Add some fresh onion (amount varies based on your personal preference)
    3. Add some fresh garlic (amount varies based on your personal preference; optionally, you may leave the garlic out)
    4. Add some fresh dill
    5. Add salt (again, personal preference; it is hard to put into measurements, since cucumbers come in such varying sizes)
    6. Add some sugar
    7. Add some pepper
    8. Add one tablespoon of sour cream (see picture). Yes, although it may look like it is not much, it is plenty. You do not want to add too much, since this would result in too much liquid in the end.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    9. Mix everything until the salad looks even throughout.

    Done! Easy, wasn’t it? Enjoy. And remember, please post pictures if you tried your own variations of this dish.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Last edited by Legio; June 13, 2013 at 06:34 AM.

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    I will stick around

    Edit: lol, how is Communism related to this?

    BLM - ANTIFA - A.C.A.B. - ANARCHY - ANTI-NATIONALISM

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamat View Post
    1. German Noodle Broth with Chicken Legs
    Isn't that kinda cannibalism to a parrot?

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    First recipe has been added.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbes. View Post
    I will stick around

    Edit: lol, how is Communism related to this?
    When the time comes, you'll know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Twilight Sparkle View Post
    Isn't that kinda cannibalism to a parrot?
    Indeed. But who cares? Let all the Unterbirds die!

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Recipes from the DDR?
    Btw, this looks really tasty.
    Last edited by Hobbes; May 20, 2012 at 05:13 PM.

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbes. View Post
    Recipes from the DDR?
    I suppose some of my recipes might be a little DDR-like. But hey, I was born 2 years before the Wall came down. Many East Germans were rather poor. Our cuisine often reflects that. In addition, the cuisine from my home area is rustic. This is just one example. I am thinking of making my next recipe about how to make German Salt Potatoes.

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Is it the special German egg noodles that brings the cost up? Could you use normal ones as well?

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    Ferdiad's Avatar Patricius
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    This must be the most efficient way to cook Noodles.

  15. #15
    Diamat's Avatar VELUTI SI DEUS DARETUR
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by edse View Post
    Is it the special German egg noodles that brings the cost up? Could you use normal ones as well?
    Yes. They are rather pricy in the US. I estimated the price up. It will most likely only cost you around 16-20 dollars. You could theoretically substitute the noodles, but it just won't taste the same without egg noodles. If you do, let me know how it turned out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ferdiad View Post
    This must be the most efficient way to cook Noodles.
    Thanks. I was expecting a negative comment from you. Phew.

  16. #16
    Ferdiad's Avatar Patricius
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    I don't hate you for expressing your feminine side.

  17. #17
    Makrell's Avatar The first of all fish
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    i likke this thread

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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Not enough birds.

  19. #19
    Gatsby's Avatar Punctual Romantic
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    Considering that the only things I can cook are french toast, omlettes and un-French toast, I look forward to reading about your culinary adventures.
    You'll have more fun at a Glasgow stabbing than an Edinburgh wedding.

    Under the patronage of the mighty Dante von Hespburg

  20. #20
    florin87's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Diamat's Cooking Thread

    great idea man. maybe i'll finally learn how to cook something else besides pizza and romanian schnitzel.

    Basarabia is Romanian!

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