Thread: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

  1. #5741

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc


  2. #5742

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    I totally forgot about this. And it seems like everyone else did too.

    This plane was so rare that you should be able to find out the name of this specific one. It flew in service of both Axis and Allies during WWII...

  3. #5743

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    It looks something like a Sikorsky S-42 flying boat, which I believe Panama Airline.used for some.of it's flying clippers, but not exactly.

  4. #5744

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Quote Originally Posted by Common Soldier View Post
    It looks something like a Sikorsky S-42 flying boat, which I believe Panama Airline.used for some.of it's flying clippers, but not exactly.
    It looks nothing like S-42. You're way off mark here....

  5. #5745
    Abdülmecid I's Avatar ¡Ay Carmela!
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    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Thanks to your hint about its service during WWII, I think I finally found it. I searched for French flying boats and Potez-CAMS 141 ticks all the boxes. Apparently only one was constructed, before France got distracted by the war with Germany, which was named Antarès.

  6. #5746

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Correct. Although the design was accepted as new long range maritime patrol flying boat for French Navy, the project was low priority for France, and thus, only prototype, named Antarès, was completed before French surrender. Afterwards, it was operated by Vichy France from bases in north Africa until Allied invasion, during which the French operating it changed sides. Continuing the patrols from Dakar in Free French colours, Antarès sunk U-105 in 1943, but was eventually decommissioned and scrapped in 1944.

  7. #5747
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    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Next one is not a ship (!), but a rilfe. It's quite a famous weapon and is very easy to identify, once you find the soldier's nationality:

  8. #5748

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Fusil modèle 1866, coloquially known as Chassepot. French single-shot bolt action rifle that featured prominently in Franco-Prussian war. It was, at the time, most advanced service rifle in the world, and first to include rubber gas obtuator.

  9. #5749
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    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Chassepot is correct. Despite being unquestionably superior to its Prussian counterpart, it ultimately failed to change the course of the war, thanks to Krupp's artillery and the incompetence of Bazaine and co. The system won't let me rep you right now, so I owe you one point.

  10. #5750

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Let's stay at small arms for a while...


  11. #5751

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    I think I have found it. It's
    The Chauchat-Ribeyrolles 1918 submachine gun using a Mannlicher–Berthier clip

    A rare French prototype intended for use by tank crews

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chauch...submachine_gun

    Here is the actual right side of the gun with the clip in place




    Cheers




    Artillery brings dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl!

  12. #5752

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Correct. Hold on a while for the rep please...one would have thought that after such long pause, I'd be clear to rep you but alas, I cannot.

  13. #5753

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Quote Originally Posted by Sar1n View Post
    Correct. Hold on a while for the rep please...one would have thought that after such long pause, I'd be clear to rep you but alas, I cannot.
    Don't worry about it. I'm sure I owe one or two--maybe even to you, but have simply lost track at this point.

    Cheers

    P.S. I'll get something posted tomorrow. The big brown truck is bringing something I may use.
    Last edited by Forward Observer; May 14, 2019 at 10:58 PM.
    Artillery brings dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl!

  14. #5754
    Spear Dog's Avatar Primicerius
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    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    repped, cool gun by the way - steam punk all the way






  15. #5755

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Quote Originally Posted by Spear Dog View Post
    repped, cool gun by the way - steam punk all the way
    Indeed. One that defies traditional classification a bit-using full power rifle cartridge would make it battle rifle, but it was too short to make proper use of it. It's called an SMG, but the recoil and ammo capacity preclude sustained automatic fire. And it was intended for close range protection, unsuitable for longer range fire....so you can't call it assault rifle either.

    And thanks for backing me up.

  16. #5756

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    This may be too easy, but UPS just delivered it, so I wanted to show it off. Staying with small arms, here's my submission:



    Cheers
    Artillery brings dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl!

  17. #5757

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    A beauty....but all the early rifles and rifled muskets look the same. I'll guess Springfield model 1855.

  18. #5758

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Good guess, but no cigar yet. Notice that my example only has two barrel bands and a smooth faced lock plate.

    The 1855 Springfield was a muzzle loader with three barrel bands. It also had a Maynard tape primer system so there
    is a tear shaped door on the lock plate. Under the door was a compartment that held a roll of paper caps very similar to the old rolls of caps we used in toy cap guns when I was a kid in the 1950's. Here's a shot of an 1855 lock plate with the cap compartment cover door opened. The date on the lock was the year of manufacture and not the model.

    The tape priming system was problematic and proved unreliable in the field. Still the gun could still be used with standard caps that fit over the nipple so they were used that way in the early stages of the ACW until they could be replaced by other models with standard lock styles. Only about 60000 of the 1855's made it into the hands of the Union soldiers. The South captured Harpers Ferry in 1861 and confiscated all the parts and tooling, which were sent to Richmond, VA.

    Consequently the rebels manufactured a rifle in Richmond with the tooling and even though it did not have the Maynard priming system, the lock plates still had a hump on the top edge of the lock plate where the compartment would have been and the hammers had the high arch designed to clear the hump. Ironically, some of the finest rifles produced by the Confederacy were with machinery and tooling they stole from the North.



    Cheers
    Artillery brings dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl!

  19. #5759

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Oh well...I just had to go and find out...I hate to give up.

    Looks like one of trapdoor Springfields, model 1873 most likely....quite a famous one in US I think, first breechloader rifle adopted as general issue into US army...

    I wanted to wait a while, but then, I found something interesting to post...

  20. #5760

    Default Re: Identify that Tank/Ship/Plane/Artillery etc

    Sar1n, You nailed it.

    It is in fact, the model 1873 two band musket chambered 45-70 cal, commonly known as the .45 gov. cartridge. The adoption of the 1873 Springfield was the culmination of 9 years of experimentation in the conversion of the former muzzle loading muskets of the ACW to breech loaders using some of the same manufacturing equipment and many existing parts. They made both a rifle and a carbine--the latter famously used by Custer's men at the battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876.

    After the ACW, the US ordinance department had little money and fewer resources to develop a new metallic cartridge breech loader from scratch, but they knew that the muzzle loader was doomed to obsolescence--especially for the military. Hence the conversion experimentation.

    The English did something similar with converting their Pattern 1853 and 57 Enfields to the Snider breech loading system. Where the Allin system breech block hinged up from the rear on the Springfield, the Snider system hinged over to the side.

    Both versions of the Springfield, with minor technical improvements and one model update along the way, remained in service until 1893 when they began to be replaced by the new Krag-Jorgenson bolt action rifle in 30-40 cal smokeless. However the last model 1884 Trapdoors actually saw service with secondary units in Cuba during the Spanish American war in 1898. They were all subsequently sold on the military surplus market in the early 1900's for peanuts. Later on, Hollywood bought tons of them and used them for ACW movies or even welded on fake flintlock actions to replicate earlier periods. I've even seen them made up to look like Napoleonic muskets or even pirate pistols. They made great fake muzzle loaders that were actually breech loaders.

    I have a novelty reprint of a 1908 Sears catalog, which offers surplus Trapdoors in their firearms section. One could get a surplus rifle, 20 rounds of surplus ammo and a bayonet if they wanted it for the grand total of $2.75 plus shipping. That's equal to about $75 US in 2019 dollars. They cost a bit more than that today due to scarcity.

    My specimen was produced and inspected in 1879, but it has a mint bore and is in exceptionally fine condition for a 140 year old rifle. I reload, so I will have no problem working up some safe loads for it.

    You have the floor.

    Cheers
    Artillery brings dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl!

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