Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Playing England but can't recruit longbowmen

  1. #1

    Default Playing England but can't recruit longbowmen

    Title. Current year in my campaign (Early, with RR/RC) is 1221 but I can't recruit longbowmen anywhere in my territories, castle and fortress alike, even though they have the requisite buildings. Mercenary Welsh longbows still show up though.

    Only thing I can think that may have broken this is that I converted Winchester into a town early on and this somehow broke longbow availability everywhere. Same thing happened in my previous campaign as the Moors; when I captured England, I could recruit longbows there as local units. But once I converted Winchester, I lost the ability to recruit them period.

    I'm guessing there's no fix to this and I'm resigned to playing England without their signature unit...

  2. #2
    Judeman266's Avatar Senator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,027

    Default Re: Playing England but can't recruit longbowmen

    With RR/RC the other longbow units don't show up until later in the campaign.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk


  3. #3

    Default Re: Playing England but can't recruit longbowmen

    You get them around 1270. Why convert Winchester to a town. I'll rather convert Exeter and York to castles to get more of them.

    Here's some history for you

    The longbow in use by the English as a tactical weapon first appeared in Wales under Edward I. The 800 Gwent and Crickhowell archers received 3d a day and the 100 Macclesfield archers in Edward I's service in 1277 received 4d a day in contrast to 2d a day for infantry and archers in general. He also recruited archers from Glamorgan, the Gower, Kidwelly, Llanstephan and Pembroke. This difference in pay indicate that Macclesfield, Gwent and Crickhowell archers had higher status than other soldiers and might have been the first true longbowmen in organized service. We have no archaeological proof of the use of longbows in this time period, but it’s likely they at least used a bow of around 5 feet to 5.8 feet in length. A longbow is usually longer than 6 feet by a few inches.
    "Alea iacta est"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •