Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 149

Thread: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: Mar 16]

  1. #61

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    A dark chapter indeed, but a very enjoyable one. Your description of the massacred town is superb and comes to life when I read it. Little details like the overturned cart of fruit or a children's toy are really touching and makes the scene more real to the mind's eye.

    Really a good chapter! +rep

    PS: You can be very proud about your map, it looks amazing!
    I'm glad that the dark installment wasn't too dark. I was starting to feel that the AAR needed a bit more emotion, and this seemed a good way to bring some in. I also wanted to play with the fact that in the game some rebel stacks have a tribe or ethnic tag in parentheses (something like Rebel Army (Lucanians)) whereas others say "bandit" in their name. I figured the "bandit" ones are armies truly outside the law, whereas the others are just independent polities or rebellious groups. And since the bandits are criminals, I thought I could use them to move this element of the storytelling forward a bit.

    I'm also glad to hear the map works. I'm working on a much bigger one that goes from Arabia to Britain that I (or others) could use as a resource, and I will model that bigger map off the same principles. So it's good to hear that what I have so far is good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Swaeft View Post
    A very vivid and haunting chapter, which clearly shows the horrors of war. As always your description is excellent and allows the readers to create very detailed images in their mind with regards to what you are trying to portray. I really cannot find much to critique - normally I'd suggest a chapter isn't complete without a picture or two, but the mood and setting you've created with words only seem to fit very well on their own, so it's all good. Maybe just a little update for the campaign map and other details from time to time would be good.

    Also, loving your new sig! Very nice image there.

    Edit: Reppy incoming! Once I can...
    Well, I need to open a custom battle to get good screenies, but I will add one or two into the next installment (which will be up by tomorrow morning at the latest; it's all typed and ready to go, but I have people visiting and so can't really run off for an hour to run battles, take screenshots, and edit them to be presentable). Another thing that you will have to wait for is any form of larger campaign map update. There will hopefully be some throughout, but I want to stick with the perspective of our main army, and from that perspective they will only rarely have solid info on what anyone else is up to. They know Ravîv'êl is supposed to be around Tayma distracting the Lihaynites, but there's no way for them to know for sure. And a messenger sent from Rekem (Petra) would only go marginally faster than they are, and so would arrive very late and with outdated news. I want to try to showcase how precious and rare good information was at that time, and that is best done (in my opinion) by not giving campaign map updates, but rather sticking to exactly what our characters know. So some info will be outdated or just plain wrong, and I hope that is not too irritating for you.

    I also like the new sig! If you really think it's cool feel free to shoot some rep to Lifthrasir, as he's the one responsible for it being classy and not a globbed together amateur attmpt from myself.



    Now, I will try to get the screenies together as soon as possible, and you'll all have the next update by tomorrow morning at the latest.
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  2. #62

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Continued from Chapter 2 - Part III




    Chapter 2
    First Moves


    --------------------------------------------------
    (Part IV)


    As they left Al-Hijr Mun'at had sent Khalil and a dozen riders to the windward side of the settlement to start the blaze. The rest of the army had begun marching toward Dedan, desperate to be away from the haunted walks of the dead town. They were already spent from the day's exertions but they moved for another two hours, halting when finally they reached the narrow cleft where Wadi al-Jizl plunged between sandstone cliffs to run down to their enemy's home. The camp they set was close and quiet, the tents huddled together, leaning north to avoid the looming danger of Lihyanite soldiers and south for fear of the sprites that would surely be carried on the wind that night, and as darkness fell and the watchmen's fires were lit the flames they had left behind finally took hold, creating an inferno that cast the sky in sullen red and vengeful scarlet, an omen perhaps of what was to come.

    Mun'at slept poorly that night, drifting across dreams of pain, blood, and oblivion, and when he woke the next morning he could not fully shake the chill in his heart or rage in his hands. The demons would pay for their actions. He would see to it.

    He stepped forth from his tent into the hubbub of men breaking camp all around him, and uncharacteristically unsure of what he might to do help, he simply stood and watched, seeming transfixed. After a short span he shook his head, took his water-skin from his belt, and poured it over his arms and face, washing the blood and earth from his skin. To use their scant supplies in such a way was a luxury, to be sure, and something unfit in a commander of fighting men on the move, but he could not turn his mind to the day's work so long as his body bore the stains of Al-Hijr.

    With clean hands and clear head Mun'at finally began to gather his own supplies and make ready to move, his efforts sped along by the assistance of those of his companions who had finished packing their own gear, and within an hour all assembled were prepared to march, to make the final push to Dedan and strike the heart of Lihyanite power. However, before commencing such a bold undertaking Mun'at called his captains to council, to determine their plans of attack and what should be done if the garrison sallied forth to meet them.

    As they gathered round Mun'at he began to scratch in the dirt, sketching the locations of his men, their target, and the course of Wadi al-Jizl which would take them there. He pointed out where the cavalry should ride, how far back the baggage train should wait, and where their rearguard might be best protected, taking suggestions and critiques all the while. As the fighting men thus spoke Wayyuq moved closer, examining the rough map traced over the dusty ground. He was only a scout, but Mun'at had treated him as a captain of the recruits from Dizad and so he had joined the council as was his right. Seeing the proposed route he slowly raised a hand and began to speak, somewhat tentatively at first but more forcefully with each word.

    "Commander," he began, "you have spoken of marching down the course of Wadi al-Jizl, but there is another way as well." He knelt down beside the crude drawing and traced his finger in a wide arc going from their position to the east and then south towards Dedan. "Among these hills are many dry valleys wide and firm," he said, "and if we were to send a portion of our strength that way we could encircle the enemy before ever they see us, preventing their resupplying or escaping. I know the way and could guide the men."

    After finishing Wayyuq fell silent and put on a slightly timid expression. Mun'at had not yet spoken and as he considered the proposal a captain of the Harra tribesmen interjected. "It is fine to speak of encircling the enemy," he said gruffly, "but to take that course would add days to our march, leaving us exposed in the meantime. We should stay together and march south in force."

    "The raiders might follow Wayyuq's route. They would surely arrive behind Dedan just as the footmen came upon it from above." responded Khalil in even tones, ever in defense of subtlety and trickery in war or any other endeavor.

    "But with the settlement between, both forces would be isolated from one another." the man retorted, seeming unwilling to give way. The air became tense and Mun'at prepared to weigh in and break the stalemate when a third man intervened.

    "Even supposing he knows of such a route," he said with one finger pointing accusingly at Wayyuq, "why should we trust some half-Lihyanite dog?!" With that the council erupted, the warriors quickly aligning themselves by clan and tribe, hurling familiar trusted insults at one another, their voices growing steadily louder. As the verbal assault continued and to such little effect weapons were slowly taken to hand, to be ready should the others lash out. After all, no man there would strike at a comrade-in-arms, even one of another tribe, but if a blade were drawn much might be justified in self-defense. Mun'at, who was already prepared to end the discussion before the sudden turn of events, stood tall and shouted them all down.

    "Enough!" he boomed. "We come at our king's command to unite the desert peoples and you pitiful lot cannot even be united in yourselves." With eyes fixed on the last man who had spoken, whose acid words had nearly drawn blood, Mun'at continued. "Shullai, send one of your companions to the units of this... captain." he said, spitting out the last word with open disgust. "He is no longer fit for command. As for the rest of you, mark these words; if there is dissension within these ranks, so much as a whisper of mutiny, I will find those responsible and treat them not as enemies or even traitors. I will treat them as criminals, beyond the protections of law or custom, and I assure you that my ingenuity in punishment is not to be idly tested." With flushed cheeks and spittle at the corners of his mouth Mun'at stared menacingly around him until each of the assembled commanders had meekly turned his eyes to the dirt, embarrassment and shame washing over them just as quickly as their so recent desire for blood. When silence again reigned supreme Mun'at turned to Wayyuq, who through the whole affair had hardly moved.

    "And you, new friend," he began in suddenly soft tones, "please do not let this display of foolishness taint your estimation of the sons of Edum. We are a better lot than this, so long as we set aside our petty rivalries." With the last words he shot another barbed glance at his captains. "As for your suggestion Wayyuq, it is a bold one and such shrewdness in planning is certainly noted, but I would not have us split the army so close to our enemy and with the whereabouts of Al-Hijr's demons still unknown. We march down Wadi al-Jizl to Dedan." he said. "Gather your units, for we begin at once."


    Al-Hijr to Dedan


    The captains filed out sullenly, a few muttering bitter words as they left, but they went about their duties well enough and the army had begun moving in good time. However, it seemed the discord of the council had seeped into the units as well, for throughout the morning there was a tendency toward short tempers and underhanded comments.

    As they crept into the depths of Wadi al-Jizl Mun'at busied himself with the study of the land, hoping the task might drive the lingering strands of anger from his mind. The valley was wide, between two and three bowshots from edge to edge, and it was lined with a hard-packed layer of rather fine sand the color of summer wheat. Its walls were sheer faces of sandstone, columns and curtains rising into the sky and channeling the winds, creating unpredictable gusts and eddies. Thankfully, the steepness of the surrounding country also ensured that no Lihyanite scouts or bowmen might be lying in wait along the precipices, for the rocks' upper reaches were accessible to none but the eagles.

    For two and a half hours they walked through this landscape, taking the vistas and myriad sights in stride, and Mun'at was glad to notice that little by little the mood began to lighten. The captains slowly forgot their recent quarrel and began to speak more freely with one another, their men quickly following suit, and soon enough their feet were treading lightly and with ease. No voices were raised in song or laughter, for they would not needlessly announce their presence to the enemy who was now so close, but the proximity of their long-awaited goal set a buzz in the air that affected all. And so, with such feelings spreading through the army, it was all the more troubling when a pair of forward scouts came pounding pell-mell from the south, wide-eyed and shaken.

    They rode hard through the vanguard units, heading straight to Mun'at, and began speaking before they had even dismounted. "Commander, there is a force between us and the city." one said, and the other added, "They have laid siege to Dedan!"

    His brows pinched in disbelief and confusion, Mun'at turned to his companions in the hopes that one might make some sense of the news. Each looked as perplexed as he, until his gaze fell on Shullai whose eyes were darting back and forth in frantic thought, his mouth forming words under his breath. After only a moment he stopped, fixed Mun'at with a penetrating stare, and said two words: "Commander... Al-Hijr."

    Comprehension dawning, Mun'at's eyes narrowed and jaw tightened and he nodded curtly to Shullai before speaking. "Find Khalil," he said, "for we ride immediately. Rana'in," he continued, turning to his old friend, "you and Haza'el are now in command of the infantry. Follow us with all haste but hold secure your lines."

    Rana'in, ever faithful, obeyed immediately, but Haza'el would not be so easily ordered about, especially when he considered such orders to be a mistake. "Commander," he said, "if it is, as Shullai believes, the men who devastated Al-Hijr, then why should we hasten to battle? For now the enemy of our enemy can be let free, and we can simply watch as their forces waste each other away. Their siege of Dedan can do us no harm."

    "No, Haza'el, you are wrong." Mun'at responded. "To let such fiends strike at what they will does harm to us all, for we through inaction allow evil to be done and the fragile protections of law and goodwill to be thus undermined. Even if their violence is aimed only at our enemies, it does harm to us all. Besides, we come not to sack or enslave the Lihyanites, but to add their tribes to our number. How will they ever trust us if we leave them to such a fate? No, we ride at once to liberate Dedan and then to take it."

    There lay a trace of defiance still in Haza'el's eyes but he acquiesced, following in Rana'in's footsteps. At the same time Shullai returned with Khalil in tow, and behind them rode all the riders under their command. With the memories of Al-Hijr fresh in his mind Mun'at spurred his mount forward immediately, unwilling to wait for such horrors to be repeated, and every horse of the Nabati followed.

    They were already close to the capital of Lihyan, the northern length of Wadi al-Jizl all but behind them, and their sturdy beasts covered the final distance in little time. After perhaps ten minutes pounding across the valley's floor they noticed the walls becoming more distant as the vale widened and Mun'at rode up a nearby sandy rise to gain a vantage over the land that lay ahead. As he crested the hill he saw spread before him a somewhat ragged but nonetheless significant force busy constructing rams and ladders, and beyond them the hazy outlines of city walls. His cavalry was outnumbered, he could see that, and he knew not what enemies awaited them, but for now surprise was on his side. He could only hope that the Lihyanites would be as well, and that they would sally forth to aid his men. The trumpets remained silent and Mun'at did not shout any encouragement or glory to his men. He simply drew his blade and began riding hard toward the encamped enemy, his soldiers close behind, prepared to with shining iron bring justice to Lihyan.


    For Justice!








    Continue to Chapter 2 - Part V
    Last edited by Kilo11; February 02, 2019 at 08:49 AM. Reason: Added links
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  3. #63
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Soulforged
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Schoten, België
    Posts
    687

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    How fast petty differences can almost lead to disaster, then and even in today's society. Good thing Mun'at intervened in a fierce fashion, such as relieving the instigator from his command post. Wayyuq's plan is indeed theoretically a good one but I agree with Mun'at not to split his forces with a possible foe in the area. Good to see Mun'at explain why he won't implement Wayyuq's plan, some generals would say no and leave it at that. It is true that the enemy of my enemy is my friend , he's not however if he intends to massacre the enemy you wish to unite under your banner. If the Lihyanites are smart they sally out and peacefully join Mun'at's ranks after the battle is won. Of course life is not a fairy tale and thousands of reasons could lead to folly.

    On a side note. I actually think the screenshots do your writing skill injustice. You have a very descriptive and unique style of writing which transforms words into imagery to the mind's eye and I think the screenshots do the images inprinted in my head through your words a grave injustice. This is however my opinion on the matter, others might disagree. The map, as always, is suberbly done!

  4. #64

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Another nice update, containing the many minor details that I so love. Mun'at feeling guilty about using the water he had was a good touch, and the dissent within his ranks at the mention of an insult was well crafted. The dialogue is amazing and is really something that other AARtists should aspire to. An interesting battle is about to take place...can't wait to see its results. I personally would have let both my enemies fight it out, but it's good to see a little of Prince Jean in Mun'at. (Or is it the other way around? )

    I agree with Turkafinwe that the screenshots do not do your writing justice. This is a limitation of the game, perhaps you could consider dabbling in a little bit of photo editing? Playing with contrast and saturation levels and all that? Though I am glad to finally see some EB2 screenies! The general looks great!

    Edit: Regarding your comment about how information is so scarce during this time and age, I hadn't thought about it that way before, but I suppose you are right. It does add a rather compelling reason to not add campaign screenshots, and whilst that irks me slightly, I am pleased with whatever advances the story and improves the general atmosphere of the AAR. It is, after all, your AAR, so please keep doing what you're doing

    Swaeft's Scribblings (Library)| Swaeft's Snaps (Gallery)| My Blog (The Lensation)

  5. #65

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    I'm only a few chapters in and quite enjoying this AAR, bonus points for EBII as I have yet to dabble in this monstrous mod. I look forward to continuing and catching up to the latest chapter.

    Also double bonus points for playing in a region that is less represented.

  6. #66
    Alwyn's Avatar Frothy Goodness
    Content Director Patrician Citizen

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,540

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Like your other readers, I enjoyed the discussion of Wayyuq's plan and the tension between the clans which could have led to violence - and Mun'at's responses to both. His answer to Haza'el's objection, together with his previous responses, is building up an impression of his character. I like him!

  7. #67

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    First of all, sorry to everyone for the delay. Last weekend (this weekend too, actually) TWC was being wonky on me, and I couldn't get on. Then I was incredibly busy during the week and couldn't get an update posted. Anyway, here it is, and the next one is just about done too, so next week's installment should come up in a timely fashion. And while we are on that topic, I think I will be moving my regular posting day to Monday. My wife and I try to have some time together to do stuff on the weekends and I realized forcing myself to post on Sunday was taking a big chunk out of that day. So in the future I will be posting first thing Monday morning (as long as TWC lets me).

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    How fast petty differences can almost lead to disaster, then and even in today's society. Good thing Mun'at intervened in a fierce fashion, such as relieving the instigator from his command post. Wayyuq's plan is indeed theoretically a good one but I agree with Mun'at not to split his forces with a possible foe in the area. Good to see Mun'at explain why he won't implement Wayyuq's plan, some generals would say no and leave it at that. It is true that the enemy of my enemy is my friend , he's not however if he intends to massacre the enemy you wish to unite under your banner. If the Lihyanites are smart they sally out and peacefully join Mun'at's ranks after the battle is won. Of course life is not a fairy tale and thousands of reasons could lead to folly.

    On a side note. I actually think the screenshots do your writing skill injustice. You have a very descriptive and unique style of writing which transforms words into imagery to the mind's eye and I think the screenshots do the images inprinted in my head through your words a grave injustice. This is however my opinion on the matter, others might disagree. The map, as always, is suberbly done!
    Yeah, the near scuffle at the war council is a serious affair, and something that is likely to happen in tribal societies where loyaties are usually more close to home, as it were, and harder to justify towards generals or monarchs from another family, clan, or tribal group.

    Regarding the screenshots, that is the nicest compliment you could give, and I thank you much for it. I will consider omitting them from future installments, as I myself am not as partial to them. I think EBII is beautifully done, especially certain particular units here and there (check out the royal cavalry of the Saka Rauka, they're just superb!), and I wanted to showcase that a bit, but I also feel like the writing and general tone is better presented without in-game images. At any rate, I will keep taking screenshots, in case I decide to include some more later, but for now I think I'll leave them off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Swaeft View Post
    Another nice update, containing the many minor details that I so love. Mun'at feeling guilty about using the water he had was a good touch, and the dissent within his ranks at the mention of an insult was well crafted. The dialogue is amazing and is really something that other AARtists should aspire to. An interesting battle is about to take place...can't wait to see its results. I personally would have let both my enemies fight it out, but it's good to see a little of Prince Jean in Mun'at. (Or is it the other way around? )

    I agree with Turkafinwe that the screenshots do not do your writing justice. This is a limitation of the game, perhaps you could consider dabbling in a little bit of photo editing? Playing with contrast and saturation levels and all that? Though I am glad to finally see some EB2 screenies! The general looks great!

    Edit: Regarding your comment about how information is so scarce during this time and age, I hadn't thought about it that way before, but I suppose you are right. It does add a rather compelling reason to not add campaign screenshots, and whilst that irks me slightly, I am pleased with whatever advances the story and improves the general atmosphere of the AAR. It is, after all, your AAR, so please keep doing what you're doing
    Thanks to you as well for the compliment Swaeft! I did play with the screenshots a bit, but just couldn't get them to quite what I'd like. I have images in my head, and though the game does the best I think a game could in getting there, it still just doesn't seem right to me.

    I'm also glad the point about information scarcity doesn't irk you too much. I like the idea, and it also means that I can play some areas of the campaign and not have to write them up later, because our main protagonists don't even know about the events. It allows me some much needed space to just play and leave off writing for at least a teeny bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by SanyuXV View Post
    I'm only a few chapters in and quite enjoying this AAR, bonus points for EBII as I have yet to dabble in this monstrous mod. I look forward to continuing and catching up to the latest chapter.

    Also double bonus points for playing in a region that is less represented.
    Good to see you SanyuXV! I didn't want to toot my own horn too much when you asked for AAR suggestions, but I'm glad you decided to come by. I hope the installments are enough to keep you around for a bit!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    Like your other readers, I enjoyed the discussion of Wayyuq's plan and the tension between the clans which could have led to violence - and Mun'at's responses to both. His answer to Haza'el's objection, together with his previous responses, is building up an impression of his character. I like him!
    Yeah, he is indeed a bit of a character. I don't know if you read Terry Pratchett's Discworld books at all, but when I think of Mun'at I sort of think of Vimes of the city watch. A man of iron, who's more likely to break than bend, and who is a fiend for the straight and narrow. We'll see if circumstances ever do indeed break him.
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  8. #68

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Continued from Chapter 2 - Part IV




    Chapter 2

    First Moves

    --------------------------------------------------
    (Part V)


    As he began moving the slope ahead of him slid and flowed, the shifting sands forcing him to slow his mount or risk wounding her. Mun'at relaxed his legs and leaned back, and as his riders gained on him he more carefully examined the enemy they were approaching. Some of the watchmen had spied his charging soldiers and were shouting to their distracted comrades, desperately trying to get them to turn their attention from the city that so held their gaze. As they hastily formed their lines and took weapons to hand there was some subtle note, some hint of recognition or perhaps memory that confused and troubled Mun'at. He sought to put it out of his mind and raised his sword for the clash that soon would come when a light gust of wind unfurled the enemies' banners.

    Mun'at's eyes grew suddenly wide and he dropped his blade, raised his horn to his lips, and gave three sharp blasts, the signal to withdraw. His men, however, continued onward heedless of his call, and so again he blew once, twice, and by the third time they reluctantly wheeled about and broke off their mighty charge. Perplexed and more than a little angered with their commander who so senselessly had wasted their advantage they returned to Mun'at who was now slowly trotting toward the besieger's camp, his hands spread wide in a sign of peace and neutrality. Increasingly bewildered and on the verge of questioning his sanity the riders followed, their weapons still at the ready, when again the wind picked up, displaying for all to see the banners of the Nabati flying over the encampment before them.

    Mun'at's approach was slow, purposefully so to underline his pacific intentions, and in case that was not enough he dismounted as he came within bowshot of the men opposite him. He would present them a target in the hopes that such willful vulnerability would erase from their memories the bloody deeds he nearly called down on them. The soldiers of the besieger's camp held their fire but eyed him warily, holding spears and bows at the ready. All work on their rams had stopped, the hammers laid silently aside, and with each moment the still and tension increased, spreading over the two armies.

    Finally, a voice rang out, dispelling the rising cloud of distrust and anxiety. From deep within their ranks a man spoke, his words ringing like heavy mahogany, rich and solid. "Well men, it would seem no one wants us here, not even our friends." he said with a chuckle. The soldiers parted and Mun'at saw sitting next to a small cooking fire the warrior prince Ravîv'êl Bikrum.

    Mun'at hurried forward and embraced him, adding, "It is good to see you, old friend."

    "And you, General. At least now that you are not trying to ride us down." Ravîv'êl answered with another of his laughs. Continuing in such playful tones he asked, "What has taken you so long in getting here?"

    "We were briefly delayed by raiders near Tabuk, but late we certainly are not. Besides, I should be the one interrogating you." Mun'at said. "We were told you would take Tayma and wait there, distracting the Lihyanites while we descended on Dedan, and yet here you are." Mun'at paused then and looked around at the makeshift camp, the siege pickets, the men, and he finally noticed just how ragged they all were. The tents were frayed and rent, deep gashes cut into their sides, and every third man bore a bandage somewhere on his body, blood dried about their edges or slowly dripping down from too many of them. "Ravîv'êl," Mun'at said, his brow creased and voice suddenly soft, "what happened?"

    The easy smile faded from the prince's eyes and his face grew long. "What we intended to happen, Mun'at." he said. "War." He let out a heavy sigh before continuing. "As we quit Wadi Sirhan and began to skirt the edges of Nefud a great force of riders descended on us, coming with the dying rays of the sun and shattering mercilessly against our ranks. For a day and a half we fought them, in scattered sorties and finally pitched battle, and even though by the end the sun shone on their backs as they fled broken into the desert we too were sorely tried. After that I used the precious coin my father* gave me and enlisted the local tribes to aid us, Bedu archers and mercenary spearmen out of Judea, that our thinned lines would not be broken."

    "I thought that after such a battle we would for a time have peace, and that with so many Lihyanites scattered to Nefud you also would be granted some freedom of movement, but before we even saw Tayma we were again in combat, and you yourself have apparently born some violence as well in your journey south." Ravîv'êl paused briefly, shaking his head ever so slightly at some unspoken thought. "At any rate," he continued, "after such constant fighting I thought that we might as well move on to Dedan, in the hopes that friendly faces would again enter our lives." With the last words Ravîv'êl's smile returned and he added, "And you have, so the gamble was well taken!"

    Mun'at embraced him again and said, "Well, it is good to see you, and I am glad to have you beside us. But what of the siege? How long have you been here?"

    "One turning of the moon and a few days. No more." he replied. "But this is no proper siege. Supplies, but thankfully no soldiers, still flow into Dedan from the south, for I have not the men to encircle the city. During the days we busy ourselves building engines but that is it. Truth be told, we have been waiting for you. After all, you are to be Conqueror and Commander of Arabia." Ravîv'êl said, somehow pronouncing in clear tones the capital letters, and with a sly turn to his eyes he added, "So, General, what now? Shall we conquer Dedan?"

    Mun'at was at first silent, but after a moment he too smiled and answered, "I can think of no reason not to."


    *Glossary

    *Malka Qênu, King of the Nabati




    Continue to Chapter 2 - Part VI
    Last edited by Kilo11; February 02, 2019 at 08:51 AM. Reason: Added links
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  9. #69

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Good brief chapter. I think I see what you mean by the psychological effects of the word count

    Mun'at nearly made a monumental error right there. Glad he caught it in time. Reminded me of the battle of the five armies extended edition, when the dwarves and the elves started fighting I died a little inside, would have been awful if it had happened here. So, reinforcements have arrived, if somewhat raggedy and unplanned. Let's see how this progresses. I sense the capture of a city is imminent.

    Swaeft's Scribblings (Library)| Swaeft's Snaps (Gallery)| My Blog (The Lensation)

  10. #70
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Soulforged
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Schoten, België
    Posts
    687

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Indeed a short chapter but a good one. A terrible thing has been prevented, when friend fights friend the men's morale would plummet entirely or even worse the different tribes would take this chance to settle some scores amongst themselves. No chance for a "liberation" of Dedan from foreign invaders it seems, yet life changes all the time and greatness comes to those who can adapt to it. A siege it is. Intrigued how it will play out

    Don't worry about the delay especially when external factors come into play. It sometimes happens. Indeed post your updates on days so it doesn't interfere too much with your life. It doesn't matter to us if we get it on a sunday or on a monday or any other day for that matter, as long as it keeps coming .

    @Swaeft I also died a little when the dwarves and elves started fighting but probably for other reasons than you Swaeft. (I hate those movies for various reasons )

  11. #71

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    I just realized I totally skipped over your comment before the chapter, sorry about that.

    TWC has been wonky for me too, it keeps giving me the 502 error and something about the host is down. My chapter was uploaded late as well because of that, so no worries, I don't think anyone was able to get on. Enjoy life with your wife! We'll wait patiently, as always

    The point about information scarcity irks me SO MUCH. I NEED TO KNOW WHAT'S GOING ON - oh sorry my brother was typing that I mean yes I'm fine with it, and I know exactly how you feel about writing about other parts. When I play my crusader states campaign I feel this pressure to write on every single battle that happens no matter where Prince Jean is at the moment, but that's also partly because the crusader states is small and every battle has a major impact when you have less than 2000 soldiers at your command. It's a good feeling to play without any pressure, glad you're enjoying that!

    @Turkafinwe So you're a dwarf. What other reason could there be? You're not an elf, that's for sure. Dwarf it is. But let me guess: You hate it because that wouldn't have happened at all?

    Swaeft's Scribblings (Library)| Swaeft's Snaps (Gallery)| My Blog (The Lensation)

  12. #72
    Alwyn's Avatar Frothy Goodness
    Content Director Patrician Citizen

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,540

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    That day nearly turned out very differently! I enjoyed Mun'at's meeting with his old friend, the dialogue is well done and I'm looking forward to seeing what will happen next.

    (I almost missed your update because the threat title still says that the latest update was on September 2. I forget to update my thread title sometimes, too.)

  13. #73

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Quote Originally Posted by Swaeft View Post
    Good brief chapter. I think I see what you mean by the psychological effects of the word count

    Mun'at nearly made a monumental error right there. Glad he caught it in time. Reminded me of the battle of the five armies extended edition, when the dwarves and the elves started fighting I died a little inside, would have been awful if it had happened here. So, reinforcements have arrived, if somewhat raggedy and unplanned. Let's see how this progresses. I sense the capture of a city is imminent.
    Yeah, that's what I meant about the importance of information. It is all too easy to mistake a friend for a foe, especially when everyone is covered in dirt and amped up, and I wanted to make that element of war in this period come out a bit.

    Thankfully I don't know what you're talking about with the elves and dwarves fighting (I'm guessing the Hobbit movie is to blame), as I refused to ever see the live-action version of one of my favorite books! But city-capturing is indeed imminent.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    Indeed a short chapter but a good one. A terrible thing has been prevented, when friend fights friend the men's morale would plummet entirely or even worse the different tribes would take this chance to settle some scores amongst themselves. No chance for a "liberation" of Dedan from foreign invaders it seems, yet life changes all the time and greatness comes to those who can adapt to it. A siege it is. Intrigued how it will play out

    Don't worry about the delay especially when external factors come into play. It sometimes happens. Indeed post your updates on days so it doesn't interfere too much with your life. It doesn't matter to us if we get it on a sunday or on a monday or any other day for that matter, as long as it keeps coming .

    @Swaeft I also died a little when the dwarves and elves started fighting but probably for other reasons than you Swaeft. (I hate those movies for various reasons )
    It will always keep coming Turk. You can't stop the signal! (a pint for whoever gets that reference first )

    And it seems the movie is to blame. I stand by my assessment that those films can suck it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Swaeft View Post
    I just realized I totally skipped over your comment before the chapter, sorry about that.

    TWC has been wonky for me too, it keeps giving me the 502 error and something about the host is down. My chapter was uploaded late as well because of that, so no worries, I don't think anyone was able to get on. Enjoy life with your wife! We'll wait patiently, as always

    The point about information scarcity irks me SO MUCH. I NEED TO KNOW WHAT'S GOING ON - oh sorry my brother was typing that I mean yes I'm fine with it, and I know exactly how you feel about writing about other parts. When I play my crusader states campaign I feel this pressure to write on every single battle that happens no matter where Prince Jean is at the moment, but that's also partly because the crusader states is small and every battle has a major impact when you have less than 2000 soldiers at your command. It's a good feeling to play without any pressure, glad you're enjoying that!

    @Turkafinwe So you're a dwarf. What other reason could there be? You're not an elf, that's for sure. Dwarf it is. But let me guess: You hate it because that wouldn't have happened at all?
    Well, I'm glad it wasn't just my computer or internet being wacky. That would be worrisome.

    And you are just gonna have to deal with not knowing That's the way life is. But keep your chin up. At some point he'll hit a port city or stick around long enough to get a good batch of info about what's going on other places. Info is scarce and hard to come by, but not absent entirely.

    Can't speak for Turk, but I'd most certainly say it's hated because why make a movie based on a book if you can't even stick to the details of the book! Write a new screenplay, or follow the beloved and oh so wonderful story that you're given.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    That day nearly turned out very differently! I enjoyed Mun'at's meeting with his old friend, the dialogue is well done and I'm looking forward to seeing what will happen next.

    (I almost missed your update because the threat title still says that the latest update was on September 2. I forget to update my thread title sometimes, too.)
    Thanks for the comments Alwyn. I'm glad the dialogue is working nicely, as I often find transitions into and out of dialogue to be one of the more tricky things to get smooth.

    And thanks for the reminder about the post date being changed.
    Last edited by Kilo11; October 02, 2018 at 03:49 AM.
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  14. #74

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: September 2]

    Continued from Chapter 2 - Part V




    Chapter 2
    First Moves


    --------------------------------------------------
    (Part VI)


    The remainder of Mun'at's army, the spears, bows, and desert tribesmen, arrived a short time later, prepared to join in a bloody battle and pleasantly surprised to instead find themselves sitting beside old friends and trusted kinsmen too long absent from their lives. So relieved and overjoyed were they that they even spoke with the mercenary soldiers despite their sundered heritage. They traded stories of past battles and speculated what the generals had planned for their futures and through it all they showed no signs of disunity or displeasure.

    For the rest of that day the men were given leave to rest and enjoy themselves and as darkness fell a token force of sentries was set on rotation to watch the borders of the suddenly impressive encampment. However, no cry disturbed the sleep of the Nabati that night and all woke the next morning refreshed and with bold spirits, the rising red sun proudly displaying the city before them, their long-awaited objective finally within their grasp.

    The low walls of Dedan, so brightly lit, shone the color of sand, a washed-out and secondhand mixture of orange and gold, but behind them could be seen taller buildings of purest white, with here and there some richer structure bearing brilliant shades of blue or violet. The houses of the merchants, no doubt, whose control over the spice routes of the northern Hijaz had granted them wealth and luxury beyond their means. Beside such beauties the other buildings seemed crude and altogether wanting, but even those were better than the tents that so long had provided the only shelter for the fighting men of Edum.

    Outside of one such tent, perhaps a mark cleaner and more refined than the rest, sat Mun'at and Ravîv'êl discussing what was to be done. Both were experienced commanders and generally diplomatic individuals, and one would expect such abilities to result in a rapid choice of methods and means for assault, but in fact this had paradoxically prevented them from making any progress whatsoever. Mun'at was general of the larger force, and moreover the one tasked with conquering Dedan, but Ravîv'êl Bikrum was crown prince of all the tribes who pledged themselves to the Nabati standard, and so far neither had been willing to settle who was actually in charge. For the time being this state of affairs was unproblematic, for the rams were not yet complete, but soon enough they would be forced to address the issue and be done with it.

    As they continued to exchange pleasantries while manifestly avoiding any topic which might lead to that inevitable conversation a sentry ran to them, his captain just behind, lingering like an overprotective mother. In hurried but clear tones he told them that the garrison of Dedan had begun to sally out, seeming no longer content to hide behind their walls. More likely they had seen Mun'at's force arrive the day before, and unwilling to allow the enlarged aggressor to encircle and starve them out they chose instead to fight. It was bold and would avail them little, but the show of defiance still for some reason put a thin smile on Mun'at's lips.

    Without thinking he addressed the sentry's captain. "Call the men to arms, all of them, and form the lines as usual. And while you are about it send the cavalry commanders to me at once." He then turned to Ravîv'êl. "It would be best if you and your men took the center, for your leadership and their experience will hold the ranks more surely than a thousand spears could."

    As Mun'at finished a heavy silence welled up and there was a drawn moment. Ravîv'êl breathed slowly, his gaze fixed on a point in the middle distance and his features betraying nothing, his jaw set. After a short span he seemed to reach a decision and nodded to himself ever so slightly, saying, "Certainly Commander." With no further word to Mun'at he turned on his heels and walked away, shouting to soldiers left and right as he did so, already beginning to rally the men and carry out his orders. As he watched the retreating figure Mun'at let out a deep sigh, not realizing he had been holding his breath all the while.

    Uncertainty and second-guesses might have undone Mun'at then and there, but before he could begin to dwell on what had happened Shullai, Khalil, and Rana'in rode up, eagerly asking after their parts in the coming battle. Their commander did not respond immediately, instead taking a moment to collect his thoughts and the options available. When finally he spoke it was in measured tones, each word carefully placed. "Shullai and Rana'in, you will ride with me and the lancers carrying the western flank." he said. "Khalil, your skills in harassment and antagonism seem daily to grow, and so you will take the bowmen and skirmishers and ride forth at once, harrying the enemy as they move to approach our position." Mun'at then turned and pointed to the sandy hill he had ridden down the day before. "The infantry will move to the crest of that rise. See to it that Dedan's garrison finds its way there as well. Now move!"

    Their orders given, each moved to carry out his respective mission and as Mun'at reached the summit of their shifting mount and began to organize the spears and bows assembled there he could already hear distant wails carried on the wind, the first macabre successes of Khalil's task. He turned to survey the carnage and saw the Lihyanite soldiers far advanced over the cracked and scrubby plain, a thin trail of fallen lying forlornly behind them. The raiders continued their sorties, riding to and fro on all sides firing arrows and hurling javelins, and their relentless persistence had already set the foe near to wavering. Sensing their weakness Mun'at rode west and then south with all of his remaining horsemen, allowing the soldiers of Dedan to close unhindered with his lines. With a feeble and ragged cry they charged stumblingly up the sliding slope, a third of their number falling headlong from exhaustion before even reaching the Nabati spears.

    Mun'at's cavalry were moving fast, skirting the outermost edge of the battle, but as he passed the Lihyanite men he looked more closely at their numbers, his gaze suddenly turning mournful and crimson with shame. He had expected to meet veteran raiders and tribals of Dedan, men who for years had practiced their arms against the hundred tribes of North Arabia, but what he saw were militia and city watchmen, farmers, potters, weavers, and thief-catchers. They were a poor enemy, and little deserved to die for their obstinance.

    Mun'at wheeled about, rapidly calling orders to his cavalry. They formed their lines but did not couch spears or lances for the charge. Instead, each man took his horn to hand and began slowly to trot toward the exposed backs of the enemy ranks, picking up speed with each step. As their pace quickened the deeper ox- and oryx-horns began a low and melancholy cry, their song soon augmented by the braying of higher instruments. For half the distance to their foe they continued thus, growing louder by the second, and when it seemed their symphony would split the sky Mun'at's companion cavalry, who so far had remained silent, joined in with a mighty blast. Disoriented and in disarray the Lihyanites broke before even the first of Mun'at's horsemen could strike a blow, and as they fled over the sands his men individually and in small groups disarmed them all.

    An hour and a half after their departure from Dedan the Lihyanite garrison returned in nearly full complement, Mun'at riding at their head with their commander beside him. The defeated soldiers panted pitifully under the afternoon sun but they held their heads high, seeming little to notice the horsemen herding them along. As the company of victors and vanquished passed between the city gates there was a wariness in the air, but little sense of fear or open animosity. People still walked the streets, if perhaps more quickly than usual, and faces could be seen through open windows and doorways. The tension remained until Mun'at reached the governor's house where, after a short conversation, the weapons of the city guards were returned and the men sent back to their posts. Mun'at then briefly embraced the garrison commander and commended his bravery in battle and then he too departed. And as the militia and watchmen dispersed, leaving the companion cavalry of the Nabati behind, the walls and avenues of Dedan breathed a sigh of relief.



    Continue to Chapter 3 - Part I
    Last edited by Kilo11; February 02, 2019 at 08:52 AM. Reason: Added links
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  15. #75

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 2]

    A rather easy battle, from the descriptions. Though no less an accomplishment for our dear Mun'at. If I may have a suggestion, perhaps some post battle report screenies may be added in a addendum in a spoiler or something to separate it from the story? I know how you like to keep it rather uninformative from Mun'at's point of view but no need to hide your heroic victories from my eyes

    Swaeft's Scribblings (Library)| Swaeft's Snaps (Gallery)| My Blog (The Lensation)

  16. #76
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Soulforged
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Schoten, België
    Posts
    687

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 2]

    Once again Mun'at shows that he is a kind and honourable man sparing the lives of those who don't need to be killed. A rather "peaceful" way of doing battle and conquest. Let's hope that the population of Dedan is worthy of Mun'at's generosity and repay him with loyalty in the years to come. Always troublesome when there is no clear answer to who the leader is. I'm sure this problem will come back until the answer is nice and clear because even though Raviv'el has backed down on this instance, I don't think he will want to be the subordinate of Mun'at forever.

    On a side note: I agree that they could've done a much better job by just following the amazing source material. They could indeed have written a new screenplay but then you can't call it an adaptation of the book. You can't do both I would say. The 1977 Hobbit movie I liked quite a lot to be honest.

  17. #77
    Alwyn's Avatar Frothy Goodness
    Content Director Patrician Citizen

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    6,540

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 2]

    Great update! The tension between Mun'at and Ravîv'êl Bikrum over command was particularly good, as were the sudden event which prompted the resolution of this question and Mun'at's reaction to his enemy when he sees them.

  18. #78

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 2]

    Quote Originally Posted by Swaeft View Post
    A rather easy battle, from the descriptions. Though no less an accomplishment for our dear Mun'at. If I may have a suggestion, perhaps some post battle report screenies may be added in a addendum in a spoiler or something to separate it from the story? I know how you like to keep it rather uninformative from Mun'at's point of view but no need to hide your heroic victories from my eyes
    It was indeed a breeze. On starting the campaign there are these roving stacks of pure cavalry armies everywhere across North Arabia and I was sure I'd get dosed in no time, hence me going south with all my might, but they came at me in little groups rather than joining together, which made them manageable and left Dedan pretty open.

    Maybe I will start taking screenshots of the info scrolls for your enjoyment. I have a slightly principled objection to using them, but I might be able to get over that. We'll see. At any rate, for the next battle that comes in I hadn't taken any screenshots, so you'll have at least one more without info. Try not to be too grumps about it

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkafinwë View Post
    Once again Mun'at shows that he is a kind and honourable man sparing the lives of those who don't need to be killed. A rather "peaceful" way of doing battle and conquest. Let's hope that the population of Dedan is worthy of Mun'at's generosity and repay him with loyalty in the years to come. Always troublesome when there is no clear answer to who the leader is. I'm sure this problem will come back until the answer is nice and clear because even though Raviv'el has backed down on this instance, I don't think he will want to be the subordinate of Mun'at forever.

    On a side note: I agree that they could've done a much better job by just following the amazing source material. They could indeed have written a new screenplay but then you can't call it an adaptation of the book. You can't do both I would say. The 1977 Hobbit movie I liked quite a lot to be honest.
    Part of it is also simply being sensible as well though. To use unnecessary force might well turn a population against you, making future unrest more likely. On top of that, having some city watch left to keep order during transition can also be a good thing, so long as they hold no grudes (again, limiting violence can help mitigate that risk). The issue with who is really in command won't be a real issue for Mun'at and Ravîv'êl in what comes though because Ravîv'êl will be staying on in Dedan as governor (I think).

    Side note: You're right about the animated one; that got it spot on!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alwyn View Post
    Great update! The tension between Mun'at and Ravîv'êl Bikrum over command was particularly good, as were the sudden event which prompted the resolution of this question and Mun'at's reaction to his enemy when he sees them.
    Thanks Alwyn. I wanted to include some of the tension of "who's in charge" because it's one of the things that isn't really in the game at all and that as a result is often absent from AARs, but that was (and in some places still is) a very real issue. Ambition was always present in men and women of power, and settling who would lead in such tense situations could be a delicate and potentially bloody affair. Here it wasn't, but we will definitely need to be on the alert for potential power grabs in the future.
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  19. #79

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 2]

    Continued from Chapter 2 - Part VI




    Chapter 3
    Crimson Sands


    --------------------------------------------------
    (Part I)


    He was lying on his side, one hand over his mouth, the other clutching his stomach. With a crash and a deep rushing sound he felt his body press heavily into the sleeping mat beneath him and then even more quickly the feeling of weight dissipated, the momentary lightness rolling his anguished innards without mercy. He fought back the urge to vomit, again, knowing that he could not spare the energy required, could not lose the precious little nutrients that still lingered in his system.

    As the deck beneath him again leveled off Tharin swung his feet down to the floor, unsteadily bringing himself to an upright position. He leaned against a pillar while the ship shuddered against the bottom trough of a wave, and as the interior horizon briefly matched that of his own battered inner ear he took a few stumbling steps forward toward the ladder that led to the aft deck. Everything around him creaked and swayed, in theory the whole mess retaining alignment with that of the solid earth they so long ago left, but he could no longer bring himself to believe that story. He took three shambling steps to another scratching wooden column where he rested as the ship pitched up, hung motionless, and crashed down, and then again a few steps while the assemblage of wood, canvas, and grease leveled off. Then again, a rest, a few steps, a moment of painful weightlessness and a barely restrained impulse to retch and give it all up.

    After far too long he reached the ladder and realized how very hard it would be to climb with one hand on his head trying to keep it from unscrewing itself. But with the pounding and the ever-present rock and roll of the decks he could neither trust himself to move without that simple easement of his pains. One hand on the rails he silently counted to ten, taking deep slow breaths, forcing the sea-salt air into his lungs. He could still feel the bile at the back of his throat, taste the hint of acid and old dried fish from the morning, and the ponderous hammer strikes against the inside of his skull continued in their torturous labor, but the sweat on his brow began to cool and his hands to regain their steadiness.

    Tharin quickly hauled himself up the rough wooden rungs and emerged into a world utterly unlike the close stinking pit below. The ship was awash in the unsullied light of the noonday sun, a gentle breeze dusting the decks in a fine spray of diamond and silver. The men, both his soldiers and the onyx-skinned mariners, were casually chatting, their periodic laughter pleasantly offset by the crying of gulls overhead. Tharin looked east off the starboard beam, focusing on the jagged blue haze that marked the Hijaz ranges on the horizon. As they had left Adedou Kome* ten days earlier he had marveled at their height and glory, but as they moved ever northward the peaks slowly lost their power to inspire awe, their waning starkness and the familiarity of their aspect making them seem almost pedestrian. Tharin shook his head softly at the foolishness of such a thought. Soon enough they would arrive at the port of Zambram*, from whence they would strike east for Bakkah, and again the mighty Hijaz would stand before them, not merely as some spectacle to be gazed upon but as a trial and tribulation, a test of the strength of Saba' hearts. For the sake of his queen he hoped they would not be found wanting.


    Map of Arabia





    Months had passed since their glorious near bloodless victory over Dedan and the boredom, the sheer unrelenting monotony of the place was slowly driving Mun'at to his limits. A careless speaker might say it was driving him mad, but such words would be an injustice to him and his changing spirits. The general of Edum still commanded his senses -- perhaps to his dismay -- but with each passing day he became more irritable, less patient, and in some strange way quietly aggressive as well. When others spoke he would silently sit brooding, his pinched brows and too direct stares leading most to trail off mid-sentence and find some excuse to be excused rather than continue. It was the close now familiar streets, the narrows alleys and choked markets that so grated on him, making him daily grow to hate the place and its inhabitants.

    Mun'at still dwelt outside the city along with all of the Nabati cavalry and the lion's share of their foot soldiers as well, but his position and seniority demanded his presence for nearly every decision of import that was taken within the walled settlement. But this alone was not the cause for his dour moods, for he always knew that such tedium in administration would be his lot on occasion. What daily drove him to snap rather than merely speak, to scowl rather than smile, was what these Lihyanites took to be "decisions of import".

    On capturing Dedan the city's stores of wealth and goods had been written over into the ledgers of Edum, but the meager supplies had only just covered the costs of the recent siege and provisioning of Mun'at's army, and as the weeks went by and messengers arrived from Rekem there came little news that boded well. The scattered tribes of North Arabia were adept and ingenious farmers in their own way, but the desert is a harsh mistress and miserly in her proffering of gifts. The harvests each year sustained the people but availed little more that might be traded or sold, and the quarrels of Antiochus and Ptolemaios Philadelphos had severed many of the caravan routes to the west. Without even raising a spear against them the ever-hateful Greeks had already begun to bleed the Nabati.

    And so there was no coin to be used, no gold or silver with which to purchase building supplies or new arms. The people of Edum and Lihyan would go about their daily lives, tending their flocks, bringing in the harvests, or working in their petty trades, but the cities and outer settlements would see no grand works built or armies raised, and so the governance of Dedan amounted to nothing more than managing the minutiae of daily life. It was a task utterly mundane and moreover poorly suited to a foreign general ill at ease in sedentary life, all of which left Mun'at bitter and malcontented.


    As the blasting heat of summer slowly waned, the nights becoming cooler and just noticeably longer, Mun'at took to walking the crest of the city walls or riding between the many adjoining hamlets and hillside towns, Rana'in always by his side. The activity and regularity of his trips gave the impression of an attentive governor about his business while simultaneously keeping him comfortably distant from the councilors of Dedan and their trivial debates, an arrangement that agreed well with all. Then, eighty-six days after the capture of Dedan, as Mun'at and Rana'in were walking the length of the southern parapet, they saw on the horizon a broad swath of indistinct shapes. The shimmering heat of the midday sun made them dance and stream, but it was clear to see that the figures were moving north toward the city at an agonizing pace.



    *Author's Note

    I have not had a chance to edit the map yet. However, for the interested reader, Adedou Kome was a port in Saba' territory right below that little hooked outcropping of land, and Zambram was a port located west of Bakkah where the wadi meets the sea.




    Continue to Chapter 3 - Part II
    Last edited by Kilo11; February 04, 2019 at 03:51 PM. Reason: Added links
    Genesis of Empires | Community Creative Writing
    | My Library
    | My Mapping Resources
    | My Nabataean AAR for EBII
    | My Ongoing Creative Writing

  20. #80
    Turkafinwë's Avatar The Soulforged
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Schoten, België
    Posts
    687

    Default Re: Written in Sand (Nabataean AAR for EBII)[updated: October 8]

    Good to see another side of Mun'at. He is indeed no city-dweller or governor but a warrior accustomed to the free sandplains. Also through his eyes we see the mundane things of everyday life for the desert peoples which is great to expand the world a bit. The ending is also very intriguing and I can't wait to see what happens next.

Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •