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Thread: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

  1. #1
    Ltd.'s Avatar Senator
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    Default Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia



    Kingdom of Croatia (in personal union with the Kingdom of Hungary, but de facto independent to a large extent)







    UNITS


    Dalmatian Sailors


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    13th century / Tier 1






    Militia Crossbowmen


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3







    Crossbowmen


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3







    Archers


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2




    15th century / Tier 3







    Handgunners

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    15th century / Tier 3






    Communal Spearmen


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3






    Spearmen


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2



    15th century / Tier 3







    Morlachs (romance-speaking vlach communities on Croatia's territory)


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    14th century / Tier 2







    Swordsmen


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    13th century / Tier 1





    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3







    Communal Halberdiers


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    15th century / Tier 3








    Halberdiers


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    15th century / Tier 3







    Communal Nobles


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3








    Familiares / Retainers



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    13th century /Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2




    15th century / Tier 3






    Levy Cavalry


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    15th century / Tier 3







    Croatian Hussars


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



    15th century / Tier 3







    Mounted Crossbowmen


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



    15th century / Tier 3








    Knights / Vitezovi


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    13th century / Tier 1




    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3







    Ban / Viceroy of Croatia


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    13th century / Tier 1





    14th century / Tier 2





    15th century / Tier 3




    Last edited by Ltd.; October 13, 2018 at 09:47 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    Stunning! Tier 3 especially has a load of really cool new assets.

  3. #3
    McMoots's Avatar Libertus
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    I dig the half breast-plate gambeson look for some of them.

  4. #4
    Matthæus's Avatar Knez Bribirski
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    A wonderful preview !
    Units are beautiful and at the same stay true to historical sources.
    I spent 20 minutes just looking at pictures.
    I hope that we will soon be able to play with them


    Only unit I would add is "Vlach horsemen" that would be mounted crossbowmen (or horse archers) at tier 2.
    We know of their existance from written sources.
    They should not be very strong unit, but their role as ranged support for other cavalry is important (as they are only unit of such type at tier 2).


    a bit about Vlachs:"Morlach" is shortened and italianized for "Morovlach" which is probably derived from greek "Mavrovlachi" or "black Vlachs".
    Slavic (plural) would be "Morovlasi" (Morovlachi).
    It is unclear what was exactly the difference with "Vlachs" and "Black Vlachs" - if there were any.
    Booth terms can be used, even if in contemporary medieval sources there are more often called just "Vlasi" (in all south Slavic languages: "Vlasi" plural, singular is "Vlah").

  5. #5
    Hrobatos's Avatar Tribunus
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    awesome work guys! I am truly amazed!

    PS I believe that late pavise, the dark yellow one with red stripe in the middle if missing an overlay layer. There should habe be one more layer over it.

  6. #6
    Matthæus's Avatar Knez Bribirski
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    I just noticed - OMG there are no peasant archers - quick add them

  7. #7
    delmat's Avatar Tiro
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    excellent work guys!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    Looks great!
    Cant wait to play it.
    Good job!

  9. #9
    Matthæus's Avatar Knez Bribirski
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    So its finally out...
    and its a great experience to finally play as Croatia



    Some minor issues if encountered:
    • Communal spearmen (late) have wrong name (they are called "early")
    • Communan nobles (high) lack weapons in hands and seem to use wrong animation (2 handed, shield on back)
    • Faction specific Unit icons (I'm sure they will be included in later updates)


    Proposals to add additional units:

    • "Vlach Horseman" as ranged cavalry (high era). I propose stealing Calarsi from "Wallachia" rooster
    • Faction lacks any artillery

  10. #10

    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    Thank You! The lack of artillery and wrong Communal Nobles has been noted before. Correct, faction specific unit icons aren't finished yet.

  11. #11
    Matthæus's Avatar Knez Bribirski
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    Default Re: Medieval Kingdoms Total War: Kingdom of Croatia

    Descriptions part I.
    (when everything is done I will put all descriptions in "Contribute an Unit Description for MKTW!" thread):



    Dalmatian Sailors
    Dalmatian coastline is situated on one of most important naval trade routes: from Venice to the East. Wealth, and at times even survival, depended on those trade routes to remain open. But sea can also be dangerously full of threats - pirates and greedy trade rivals. So even though communes had dedicated war galleys (trireme), even on trade ships every sailor was armed. Ships crews were made of commoners but also had convicts and slaves as rowers. Equipment of sailors prescribed by statute of Zadar consists of: helmet, shield, axe or sabre and three javelins. Javelins were also used in defence of the forts, especially on Ragusan territories.

    Archers
    Contingents of archers were raised via select levy system, later known as “Militia portalis”. Basically for certain numbers of “serf-lots” a archer had to be equipped and sent to battle. Details varied according to period and geography, most common ratio was 1 solder per 20 or 33 serf lots. Cost of raising troops was covered by landowners. Select levy provided decently equipped troops, that however lacked experience and were unwilling to fight for prolonged periods or far away from home. Composite bows of Hungarian and later Turkish design were known, but most would use yew short-bows. For close combat, archers would carry “korda”, single-bladed weapon of local design similar to German messers.

    Handgunners
    These men (handgunners - puškari) were paid professionals, employed as fortress garrisons, town guards, or directly for Ban who had regiment of two hundred. Handguns of 15th century were imprecise and lacked range but had excellent armor penetration and were equally damaging to enemy morale. Despite shortcomings of early gunpowder weapons, they were widely accepted in Balkans and Hungary, Croatia being no exception.
    Most common secondary weapon of these men was “korda”, sable-like locally produced single bladed weapon.

    Crossbowmen

    Communal crossbowmen
    Large crossbow or “baleštra” was considered the most important weapon in city's arsenal and its production, purchase and distribution was strictly monitored.
    It was an vicious weapon, precise but slow firing, capable of killing even most armored opponents.
    Booth commoners and nobles served as crossbowmen, but they were separated into different units. Great care was taken to equip and train those troops. Regular training and annual shooting competitions were held - a chance to win valuable trophies. Crossbowmen were used on land, and on sea - on merchant ships as well as war galleys.
    While most of communes kept their troops close to home, balistarii from Trogir, regarded as most skilled, were used all over the kingdom. They were present in service of Ban, duke of Split, garrison of Klis fortress, queen’s retinue, and some aiding the king Sigismund.

    Communal Spearmen
    Sentry duty was compulsory for all body-able inhabitants, nobles and commoners alike. Citizens received small financial compensation for the time served, or faced serious financial fines in case of desertion. These part-time soldiers were supposed to guard city walls and gates, and to keep public order inside the walls. But catching occasional thieves and breaking drunken brawls in not the same as fighting in a real pitched battle - for which they lacked training and experience. Only officers had serious military experience.
    Weapons of these militiamen were spears and shields. They were not heavily armored - for stone walls, and local patron saint would surely protect them.

    Spearmen
    In early medieval period these men were members of warrior communities of “jobagiones castri” (Croatian - gradukmeti / translated as castle serfs). These men were living in king’s forts, were given surrounding lands to use, and were relieved of taxation. In exchange they had to guard mentioned forts and go to war unde command of district commander (župan) when asked. Their position was however still only “semi-free” because they were not allowed to depart the land they were living. Most of jobagiones served an infantry, equipped with large shields and spears.

    SwordsmenCroatia had, because of inheritance laws and collective rights for whole tribes (according to legend 12 tribes), particularly numerous class of low nobility. Most of them were, in reality, not very different from upper-class peasantry.
    A lot of these swordsmen were petty-nobility serving as retainers of more powerful magnates, or semi-free class of castle-warriors (jobaggy) living in royal fortresses for exchange for service. In late medieval period with militarization of the whole society, some would turn to military profession becoming professional soldiers, stationed in most important fortresses.
    Since many lacked proper warhorses, they served on foot fighting with swords and shields. Swordsmen wore armor, and had shields for protection. Swords are excellent close-combat weapons especially against spearmen or less armored opponents.


    Morlachs
    Vlachs are descendants of the Roman and Illyrian population that found safety against Barbarian invasions in high mountains. Vlachs partially kept their romance language and were not fully slavenized by the high middle ages. Those highlanders lived as shepherds and traders in semi-independent pastoral communities. They elected their own duke and judges but, by the “Vlach laws”, owed taxes and military service. Ones that were in possession of land and lived in villages fought with hooked spears called “unča”. These were very effective against cavalry - rider was hooked and pulled away from saddle.

    Halberdiers

    Communal Halberdiers
    In addition to their militias cities would employ small force of several hundred professionals to supplement the defence of the city fortifications and keep peace and order inside the city. In times of war their numbers were increased. In the city of Dubrovnik professional soldiers were called “barabanti”, and were stationed at all city gates. Their primary weapons at this period were halberds and swords. Do not be fooled by their light armor, these troops are not a pushover.
    Distrustful Ragusans preferred “barabants” to be recruited among catholic Croats rather than Italians (Venetian spies !) or neighbouring orthodox population (heretics !). Communes in Venetian hands would, for same reasons, prefer their mercenaries to be - Italians.

    Communal Nobles
    Defense of the city was personal obligation of everyone, nobles (members of ruling merchant families) included. It was well known fact that wealth of city commune on the Dalmatian coast does not depend on the land but on trade and craft. Therefore members of noble patrician families were not supposed to lead cavalry charges on open fields, but to defend city walls and gates - on foot. Along the nobility a few man-at-arms were present as guards of duke (knez), and because very rich could send men-at-arms to serve in their behalf.
    Wealthy patricians would not rely solely on state proscribed gear - they would buy the best armors Italian workshops had to offer. In earlier times this meant lamellae or coat of plates over mail, and later full plate armor. Weapons changed accordingly with time: from swords and shields to polearms.

    Familiares / Retainers
    Familiares were members of middle and lower nobility which entered the service of their lords, in exchange for protection and a chance of improving their social status. They were adopted into household, given land, supplies, stipends, offices and other benefits depending on their capabilities. Land grant was for life, but not hereditary in contrast to “proper” feudalism. Familiares were the basis of the nobility’s military power, and their main stronghold in maintaining the estates. They could not afford whole harness, but at minimum possessed mail shirt of local production (in later periods brigandine or cuirass) and an helmet. As such they would fought as lance-armed medium cavalry supporting their heavy armored lords.

    Levy Cavalry
    When homeland was threatened, Ban proclaimed “insurrection” or general levy. The county regiments were raised and every able man had to join. In second half of 15th century Croatia was hard pressed by Ottoman attacks, and levies were called upon regularly to check enemy raids. Numerous lower nobility, often not much richer than well-off peasants, served as light cavalry.
    They didn’t have much of an armor (often just helmet and a shield), or tactical discipline, but at least they had numbers and speed. In battle, levy regiments have to be supported by professional troops to have a chance of victory.

    Croatian Hussars
    By the end of 15th century it was clear that old fashioned and slow feudal armies could not stop the Ottomans. A new permanent and highly mobile force was needed. Inspired by successful use in Serbia and Hungary, standing formations of around 1,500 hussars were established in key fortifications. Hussars were light cavalrymen, experts in raids and counter-raids. These brave horseman discarded all armor and carried only shields for protection. In order to catch Ottoman raiders - speed is everything ! Hussar lances have longer reach than Turkish ones, which gives them great advantage in combat. In close combat saber was the most popular choice.
    New tactics were widely adopted by lower nobility and by mid 1490’s hussars were half of total cavalry cavalry forces in the land.

    Mounted Crossbowmen
    After nasty shocks caused by intrusion of eastern horse archers (Mongols in 13., Ottomans in 14. / 15. centuries) it was clear that cavalry formations need ranged support. Thus by late 14th century basic cavalry combat team called “lance” was adopted. It consisted of heavily armored knight, supported by lightly armed retainer and mounted crossbowmen. For instance, when preparing for Crusade in 1396. king Sigismund specifically asked for every knight to be accompanied by two mounted archers or crossbowmen.
    Light crossbows these men used lacked range and rate of fire of bows, but were easy to use and had good armor penetration.
    Traditionally this role in Croatian armies belonged to communities of semi-nomadic Vlachs, rumance-speaking shepherds from Dinaric mountains.

    Knights / Vitezovi
    Most of the land was ruled by mighty feudal nobility - magnates (velikaši). Each magnate raised armed detachments of 4-500 horsemen called flag or banderium, basically a small private army consisting of their kinsmen, retainers and mercenaries. In late medieval period these became permanent formations of professional man-at-arms. Catholic church was also a major landowner, bishops and knights Hospitallers had their own banderiums.
    Core of magnate’s banderium was armored cavalry. Magnates were rich enough to equip their men with full harness of an “western” knight either in German or Italian style armor. Primary weapon of an knight was heavy lance, followed by sword or mace for close combat. Their mounts were proper warhorses, in most cases unarmored.

    Ban / Viceroy of Croatia
    Ban or viceroy is an ancient tradition, going back to 10th century. He was appointed by the king, despite attempts to make this position hereditary. Ban had highest administrative and judicial authority in the land as well as supreme military command. He maintained personal unit “banderium of the Ban” of 500-1000 cavalrymen. This was permanent force, composed of professional man-at-arms. These experienced soldiers had full suits of armor of latest European fashion, imported from well known manufacturing centers of northern Italy and southern Germany. Primary weapon of an man-at-arms was heavy lance, followed by sword or mace for close combat.



    Last edited by Matthæus; November 02, 2018 at 05:17 AM.

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