Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

  1. #1
    Wallachian's Avatar Praefectus
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa


    Team Proudly Presents

    Repubbrica de Zena
    "Pe Zena e pe San Zorzu."
    (For Genoa and for Saint George)




    The Republic of Genoa

    Historical Background

    From the narrow land between the Apennines and the Sea in Liguria emerges the Republic of Genoa known as La Superba (The Superb) or La repubblica dei Magnifici (The Magnificents’ Republic). Genoa emerged as a self-governing commune within the Kingdom of Italy in the early XIth century, one of a number of Italian city-states during this period. Nominally, the Holy Roman Emperor was overlord and the Bishop of Genoa was president of the city; however, actual power was wielded by a number of elected consuls.

    Muslim raids on the Tyrrhenian Sea were repulsed by the Genoese and in 1087 Genoese and Pisan fleets attacked the Fatimid capital of Mahdia and burned the Arab fleet. This gave Genoa, Pisa and Venice control of the Western Mediterranean and allowed the maritime states to supply troops during the First Crusade. Genoa provided troops and fleets to the crusaders and entered into alliances with the Principality of Antioch and the Kingdom of Jerusalem. The Republic's role as a maritime power in the region secured many favourable commercial treaties for Genoese merchants and also parts of important cities. They came to control a large portion of the trade of the Roman Empire, Tripoli, Antioch, Armenia, and Egypt.

    Over the course of the XIth and particularly the XIIth centuries, Genoa became the dominant naval force in the Western Mediterranean and gained a central position in the slave trade, as its rivals Pisa and Amalfi declined.

    The commercial and cultural rivalry of Genoa and Venice was played out through the XIIIth century. After the Fourth Crusade and the fall of Constantinople Venice gained control of commerce in the Eastern Mediterranean. The first war broke out in 1256 from a dispute over Acre. In order to regain control of commerce the Genoese allied with the Emperor of Nicaea, who wanted to restore the Roman Empire. This happened in 1261 and Genoa regained the upper hand, receiving free trade rights from the Romans and establishing trading posts and settlements in the Aegean Sea, the islands of Chios and Lesbos and in the city of Smyrna. Genoa and Pisa also became the only states with trading rights in the Black Sea. As a result the Genoese conquered many settlements in Crimea and established the colonies of Caffa and Cherson.

    Like many Italian city states the Republic was marked by the struggle between the pro-Imperial popular Ghibelline faction and the pro-Papal old aristocratic, mercantile patriciate Guelph faction. In 1257 a popular uprising brought the Ghibelline Guglielmo Boccanegra to power as Captain of the People. In 1262 the Guelph party regained power which they would hold with short Ghibelline interruptions until the early XIVth century.

    In 1282 Pisa tried to gain control of the commerce and administration of Corsica, after being called for support by rebels against Genoa. In 1284 in the naval Battle of Meloria the Genoese defeated Pisa and the Pisans never recovered as a maritime competitor. Genoese merchants took control of trade and established colonies in Corsica, Sicily and even in Muslim North Africa, Sahara and the Atlantic Coast.

    In 1294 war broke out again between Venice and Genoa. In 1296 a Venetian fleet stormed the Bosphorus. During the course of the campaign, various Genoese possessions in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea were captured, including the city of Phocaea. The Genoese colony of Galata, across the Golden Horn from the Byzantine capital, was also burned down. In 1298 the largest naval battle fought between the two republics ended at Curzola with a crushing Genoese victory. Due to heavy losses the Genoese retreated back home and a compromise peace was reached in 1299.
    nIn 1311 Genoa experienced an internal struggle between the Guelphs and Ghibellines involving the houses of Spinola and Doria. A civil war broke out when the Spinola tried to impose a captain of the people which lasted until 1331.

    In 1339 Simone Boccanegra the candidate of the popular Ghibelline faction was elected for life as the first Doge of Genoa after a revolt of the popolo. During Boccanegra's dogate, Genoese control was extended the length of both the French and Italian Rivieras, and Genoese galleys went to the aid of Castile in their struggles against the Saracens. In December 1344 Boccanegra was forced to resign his office and was succeeded by Giovanni I di Murta.

    It is now 1345 and the new Doge is working to reassert Genoese dominance over the Mediterranean both through the traditional trade but also through force. The Venetians are still the main enemy and they must be defeated once and for all. The Genoese colonies in Crimea are under constant Tatar attack and must be reinforced and the current crusade to retake Smyrna from the Turks must be supported. Boccanegra is still lurking in the shadows ready to retake power. It is time for the Genoese to rise once again! Pe Zena e pe San Zorzo!


    UNITS



    Italian Peasants

    The peasantry of the Italian states was known as contadini due to the fact that they inhabit the contado or the surrounding countryside. They tended to the lands and engaged in agriculture, husbandry and other rural pursuits. But if their lands are invaded or if the local lords calls them to war they are conscripted into armies as rural militia forces and forced to fight for their lives and their land. As weapons they use their agricultural tools such as scythes, rakes, hoes, axes and some of these weapons would develop into actual instruments of war. They do not wear any protection and do not have any military training. As such they are prone to breaking the line and fleeing as soon as they are engaged in serious battle. They are best used as temporary garrison troops, support infantry, mopping up a defeated enemy or as a reconnaissance force as they know the terrain well.


    Berrovieri Raider Infantry

    The berrovieri were mercenaries that appeared in the Italian armies in the XIIIth century and offered their services exchange for pay. Sometimes they actually represented an institutionalized force in the countryside. They had good standing in the rural areas, almost like a rural elite being able to afford a decent house, a horse and some equipment. Some of them came from good or wealthy families and were in search of adventure. The Italian captains of the people also took berrovieri with them when they went to enforce their authority. In other areas the berrovieri would be lower on the social ladder and even engaged in brigandage. Their main role in Italian armies was to perform reconnaissance, to guard border areas and towns and prepare ambushes. Armed with weapons such as maces and protected by brigantines they are a useful light-medium infantry force but can not be relied on to hold the line for too long against other forces.



    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Italian Crossbow Militia

    Along with polearm weapons made of farming equipment the crossbow was the most popular weapon used by the Italian peasantry at war. Although the crossbow had a shorter range then a bow and was slower to reload it almost completely superseded the bow in most medieval Italian armies. The crossbow could be easily used and shot efficiently after only a few weeks of training, whereas a bow required a lot more skill and years of practice. The militiamen using the crossbows come from the peasantry or the urban poor, however a crossbow bolt can be just as deadly as an arrow bolt shot by a marksmen. The militiamen wore little armour other than their thick clothing. They can be used to harass enemy units but will rout quickly if faced by professional enemy shooters or engaged in melee battle.



    Ronconieri Militia

    The roncone was first mentioned in the XIIIth century but became a mainstream weapon of the Italian urban militias in the XIVth century. The roncone originated from a agricultural tool which was used to cut branches off trees. The purpose of the roncone in battle was to pierce armour and to unseat cavalrymen off their horses. There are verious types of roncones but the most common ones include a single piece made of iron with a blade and an extended hook one one side and a spike on the other side. The roncone represented an ideal compromise between the cost of the weapon at a time when iron was a precious metal and utility for work in the fields and woods. The ronconieri were often used in battle in combination with pikemen and pavesari. They could be used against infantry but their main role was against the cavalry.



    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Berrovieri Medium Cavalry

    The berrovieri were mercenaries that appeared in the Italian armies in the XIIIth century and offered their services and their war horses in exchange for pay. In certain regions they were exempt from certain taxes if they undertook to constantly keep a horse and rider equipment. From a social point of view they came from the middle classes and the rich inhabitants of the towns and the countryside, they were the sons of wealthy merchants and farmers, artisans or wealthy nobles of the countryside with a good economic situation. Some of them abandoned their daily activities in certain periods of the year and took up arms to serve as mercenaries in the pay of municipalities. They were hired by the representative of the municipality and contracts were drawn on a personal basis by a notary for a duration of three months. The contracts were renewable. In some cases, if the contracts allowed, the berroviere could be compensated for loss of horse and equipment through an estimation of the value of the armament. The increase use of mercenaries in the wars of Italy meant that there was an ample supply of men that took up arms of their volition at the first hint of war. They are in search of rich spoils and easy money and operate at the edge of legality. Armed with maces and other weapons and protected by armour such as brigantines and chainmail the berroveiri are a common light-medium cavalry available in the Italian armies.



    Click here for more images
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Italian Mounted Crossbowmen

    Many armies of Western Europe employed mounted crossbowmen. These men were armed with smaller and lighter crossbows then the infantry but still capable of piercing armour at close range. These mounted crossbowmen usually deployed behind the line of battle and would sally out from the rear ranks to provide a skirmish screen or a preliminary barrage of bolts. They mix maneuverability with a their rate of fire. Although not having the same range and rate of fire as the eastern horse archers the mounted crossbowmen are still a force to be reckoned with. They are very lightly armoured with limited protection such as brigantines and chainmail and helmet. They use a shot sword for melee engagements but are not well prepared for prolonged hand to hand fighting. They use their mobility to get out of harms way.



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Pisan Archers

    One of the elite forces of the Republic of Pisa, since the twelfth century, it was the guard of the archers of the marina. Pisa was among the four great naval city states of Italy and its navy established trade outposts all throughout the Mediteranean. Pisa, as an international power, was destroyed forever by the crushing defeat of its navy in the Battle of Meloria against Genoa. After that Pisa was driven out of most ifs domains and eventually acquired by Florence. After the annexation of the domains of Pisa by the Florentines, the naval forces of Pisa and all units of the marine went directly to the service of the Medici. During the late XVth century the Pisans tried to free themselves from the Florentine rule and allied themselves with other Italian states. These sailors were very well trained and experienced in combat as much as in navigation. The Pisan archers are protected by brigantine and use composite recurve bows inspired by the Saracens.



    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Genoese Pavise Crossbowmen



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 









    Spadacini Militia




    The spadacini get their name from the word spada meaning sword. In Southern Italy they are known as the clipeati while in other parts of Italy they form part of the targonieri. They represent the men that use large shields with aim of protecting the crossbowmen and handgunners. The word clipeus comes from latin and refers to the large oval shields carried by the infantry, a similar explanation exists for the targa shield aswell. The spadacini usually wear little armour beside their large shield such as padded leather or brigantines. Their role in battle is to allow the shooters to engage the enemy without fear of being attacked and to face any threats to the shooters. They are armed with short swords or daggers. In Naples they are levied from amongst the peasantry as part of the feudal system while in other Italian states they are recruited from rural or urban militias. As they are levied militiamen with little training they can not last long in melees and must be reinforced by professional troops.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 







    Lanzelonghe Militia

    The lanza longa was a 3-4 meter long spear which was in use by the Italian militias ever since the XIIIth century. Although it is shorter then a pike the lanza longa is still used in an organised formation by the Italian militiamen. The lanza longa was developed due to the vulnerability of the infantrymen to heavy cavalry charges and the need to keep the enemy at a distance. The members of the Lanzelonghe are urban militiamen which receive training in the use of the long lance and can form a defensive ring to protect against cavalry charges, although they do not have the sophisticated organisation of the late pikemen. They wear medium armours such as brigantines and helmets and use small heater shields for protection, usually on their upper arm or shoulder. These men are an efficient form of medium infantry which can hold their line against cavalry charges, although repeated heavy cavalry charges will cause them to break. They are their weakest when their formation is broken.


    Italian Spear Militia

    These soldiers represent the typical medieval Italic militias. They are designed to protect the shooters (such as the crossbowmen and arquebusiers) with their large shields. Composed of commoners and peasants, these militiamen can not afford heavy armour, having to settle for reinforced leather clothing. They are a cheap and poorly trained body of men armed with spears and able to form a shield wall which can be used effectively against the impetuosity of the enemy infantry, but it would not hold up in the face of a heavy cavalry charge.



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Italian Pavise Spearmen

    Many Italian settlements of the time such as Venice, Genoa, Milan were divided into 6 neighbourhoods known as the 'sestiere'. Florence was divided into sestiere until 1343 when it was reorgnaised into quartiere (4 neighbourhoods). Rome was more unique in the sense that it actually had 14 neighbourhoods. Naples was divided between 7 'sedili'. Even Venetian territories outside of Italy such as Negroponte and the Island of Crete were also divided into 'sestiere' based on the model of the city of Venice. Each of the sestiere or neighborhoods were required to permanently have 1,500 men in readiness to meet any emergency when half were to muster in the piazza of the city while the other half remained behind to guard its own sestiere. In the case of a general levy Italian states could raise large infantry militia armies. These militiamen are armed with spears and protected by a typical Italian large pavise and wear light armour such as padded armour or brigantines. The pavise spearmen can withstand an initial cavalry charge and can hold their own against similar infantry, however they are still only a citizen militia and will not be able to face professional soldiers in battle for long.



    Click for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 








    Guastatori Raiders

    In medieval warfare the enemy of an army was not only the opposing lord or the opposing city but also their subjects. The city states of Northern Italy relied on the land and crops outside of their gates to feed and sustain their populations. The constant state of war between rival cities meant that enemy states would raid and plunder each other’s lands in an attempt to cripple the enemy economy and reduce their ability to wage war. This devastation could cripple the agriculture for years. The Italian states developed troops whose sole purpose was to burn the enemy crops and pillage the land, these units were known as Guastatori (literally ‘devastators’). The role of these ‘crop burners’ was so important that Italian medieval strategy writers thought it was advisable that every commander have them in their armies. Initially the Guastatori were simple peasants protected only be leather cuirasses, however as the feudal system became more prominent the soldiers started having a more specific role in the armies and they adopted better equipment such as chainmail and helmets. Their main weapons are falchions and axes and they use a round shield for defense. They know the land very well and are masters of ambushing however they will not be able be hold the line against professional and armoured troops.In medieval warfare the enemy of an army was not only the opposing lord or the opposing city but also their subjects. The city states of Northern Italy relied on the land and crops outside of their gates to feed and sustain their populations. The constant state of war between rival cities meant that enemy states would raid and plunder each other’s lands in an attempt to cripple the enemy economy and reduce their ability to wage war. This devastation could cripple the agriculture for years.



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Ug 1



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Rotulari Swordsmen

    The rotulari also known as sword and buckler men appeared in the late XVth century as a response to the pike tactics adopted by the Swiss armies. This fighting style was conceived by the Italians in an attempt to revive the ancient legionnaire swordsman. Armed with the steel shields or bucklers known as rotele and a sword and have their upper body protected by armour but have no protection on the lower body to allow for increased mobility. They they proved to be a formidable opponent to pike armies and and eventually led to the downfall of the pike wall tactics. Their role is simillar to the German doppelsoldner by breaking the push and pike tactics of the enemy phalanx. They are part of the provisionati being a semi-permanent type of troop.


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 









    Italian Arquebusiers

    The Italian handgunners known as "schiopettieri" represent the troops trained in the use of primitive light firearms called variously "sclopeti", "sclopi", "manesche". Called "hand cannons" to distinguish them from pieces of artillery, the handguns are the oldest form of individual firearm: the presence of handguns seems to have been reported in 1284 on the occasion of the defense of Forli by Guido da Montefeltro; But this is an isolated witness and therefore somewhat suspect, the first reliable data dates from half a half-century later. The schiopettieri became more and more numerous in Italian armies starting with the late XIV and early XVth century and including many German experts were included as part of these. These weapons consist of a rudimentary metal tube mounted on a piece of wood and equipped with a primitive firing mechanism which makes aiming very difficult. These weapons caused more fear than actual damage to the enemy troops who were shocked by the noise and the smoke generated during firing. Given their low firing rate, the schiopettieri require good protection from pavisemen and other allied troops and use their swords for close quarter defense.



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 







    Lanze Spezzate Cavalry

    In Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries, mercenary soldiers were recruited in units known variously as barbuta, lance or corazza, consisting of two to six men. The three man lance consisted of two combatants, a men-at-arms and an armed squire, plus a page. In the mid 15th century, soldiers called lanze spezzate (literally broken lances) evolved. These were men who, for some reason, had become detached from their mercenary companies and their lances and were now hired as individuals. They were then placed in new companies and lances under a new commander. They are well disciplined professional soldiers who fight as heavy cavalry with unbroken lances, and are well protected by the finest Italian plate armour.



    Ug 1



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 






    Merchant Cavalry Militia

    The rich as well as the poor must do their civic duty for the Italian states and cities, but the rich prefer to ride. The wealth brought by trade allows Italian merchants to equip themselves with horses and better protection. They can also hire cavalrymen from the countryside and send them to battle on their behalf. However, these men are still just militias and they lack the training and elan of real knights and should not be relied on too far in battle.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Italian Lesser knights

    The Italian lesser knights were known as the milites pro commune in North Italy which literally meant knights for the commune. In Southern Italy the lesser knights came from smaller aristocratic families which had the obligation to provide companions to the knights. The military obligation of the Italian cities required the cavalry services fell on all who could afford them and as such there was a large body of men which owed the service although they were not nobles in the sense of having been knighted. The wealthy men could either go to war themselves or pay for others to go to war on their behalf. As these men were not actually knights they did not posses the usual apparatus of a knight such as squires, retinue or highly expensive equipment. They were armed with the equipment they could afford such as brigantines, coats of plate and sometimes partial plate. In later centuries the Italian local state cavalry would get gradually replaced by mercenaries. But some states such as Florence and Naples continued to try and use their own local force in their defense and various wars. These men go to war to protect their city or commune and have decent morale but they are still largely a militia force and as such can not stand up to properly trained heavy knights in battle.

    Signori Heavy Cavalry




    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Ug 1



    The nobles of Italy were known as signori and their families formed powerful ruling classes all over the peninsula. Unlike other European states the nobles established their own signorias and in many places ruled the state. The Roman families such as the Colonna and Orsini continuously fought each other for supremacy and also for the Papal seat. In Genoa the signori families such as Grimaldi and Giustiniani rivalled each other for trade and for the seat of Doge. In Florence families such as the Pazzi and the Medici established rival banks and battled for influence over the council.
    Various Venetian aristocrats such as the Dandolo or Zorzi houses bred fine horses on their mainland estates, though most of the animals were imported from Germany and Hungary. A regulation of 1239 stipulates that each Venetian knight had to have a war-horse, two other horses and three squires. The 14th century poet Petrarch declared that 'this nation of sailors surpassed all others both on horseback and at sea'. In Naples the Angevin French nobility followed their lord his new country. There they intermarried with the Italian nobility and formed a ruling Angevin nobility. Their successors now form the noble hosts of the Kingdom of Naples and are the most numerous knights and best equipped knights in the Italian peninsula. Similarly, in Sicily Aragonese nobles mixed with the local Italian nobility to form a ruling class but there was constant friction between the local Italian nobility such as the Chiaramonte family and the Aragonese nobility. Other Italian states had their own nobility and as some houses rose to the heights of power others were extinguished. These lords or signori from all over Italy could afford the most expensive equipment of time and are heavily armoured with the latest Italian plate armour, shields and helmets and fight with swords, maces, warhammers and cavalry lances. In battle they deploy in two or three lines and charge with devastating power alongside famed condotierri and the broken lances.

    Genoese Ducal Guard

    Simone Boccanegra was the first Doge of Genoa when he got elected for life in 1339. The office of the doge existed from 1339 until the fall of the republic of Genoa in 1797. Due to the fact that Simone came as a candidate of the popular Ghibelline faction which opposed the old mercantile Guelph faction he recruited a bodyguard corps from Pisa where at the time his brother was captain of the people. By using foreign mercenaries as his guard Boccanegra ensure that he would not be betrayed and assassinated by his own guard. The personal bodyguard of Boccanegra included mounted crossbowmen but also 700 guisarmiers. This ducal guard formed the core of the Genoese protection apparatus which was in charge with protecting the palazzo ducale, the retinue and the Doge himself. As the Genoese focused mainly on naval and mercantile expansion and some of the Doges were great admirals of their time the ducal guard is ready to fight both on land and also maritime battles. These men are protected by heavy armour and used heavy polearms in battle such as halberds or guisarms.



    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




    Ug 1



    Click here for more images

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



    CREDITS

    Tsardoms Team Contributors

    Cesco - modelling, skinning
    VINC.XXIII - modelling
    , skinning
    Bardas Phokas - modelling, skinning
    jurcek - modelling, skinning

    Wallachian - faction research & preview texts

    Matthaeus -
    unit materials, models, skins
    Hrobatos
    - unit materials, models, skins
    phoenix[illusion]
    - unit materials, models, skins
    stevietheconquer - unit coding
    Julio85 - preview screenshots, intro text


    Special Thanks to

    Cesco
    Hyretic
    Yamabusi OSP (Surgeon and Highland Warrior)
    Shredzorz (OSP medieval weapons)
    Mackie's OSP Weapons Pack

    Lord.Calidor(Venetian Units)
    Lord.Hamilton(Medieval Hood from his Stainless Steel Submod)
    Dejawolf OSP armor
    Narf OSP armor
    Ninja
    Madtao Baltic Total War
    Disgruntled Goat's 1066 mod
    Broken Crescent
    Burreck
    Magyar Mod 1.0
    Art of War(Joedreck and Salty)

    Rusichi Total War
    Lithuania Total War
    HELP Team
    The Housekeeper, Mylae and the team of Machiavello Total War
    Ugo Pozzati

    Sorry if we forgot anyone please let us know, lots of people worked on this and many are no longer active so some materials/credits may have been forgotten

  2. #2
    Hrobatos's Avatar Tribunus
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    7,009

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Very nice to see it released!

  3. #3
    Wallachian's Avatar Praefectus
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Its still not fully complete, missing a few pictures but its been in the works for more than half a year and I don't have access to medieval 2. So might as well give this to the public in the meantime.

  4. #4
    Hellvard's Avatar Senator
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Wow, amazing job guys Can't wait to see them in action on my screen





  5. #5
    paleologos's Avatar Moderator
    Artifex Content Staff

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Variable
    Posts
    5,494

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Well, guys, I envy your productivity!
    It takes me forever to finish my models.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    they look very great!great work from the modders here

  7. #7

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    awesome

  8. #8

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    May you and your team get untold amounts of rep.

    When's the next version?
    Absolutley Barking, Mudpit Mutt Former Patron: Garbarsardar

    "Out of the crooked tree of humanity,no straight thing can be made." Immanuel Kant
    "Oh Yeah? What about a cricket bat? That's pretty straight. Just off the top of my head..." Al Murray, Pub Landlord.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    What century are these units supposed to be from? It says mid 14th century in the description but these guys are wearing sallets, armets and barbutes from the early to late 15th century

  10. #10

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    The mod ranges from mid 14th century to early 16th century, so we're good.
    Tsardoms: Total War campaign mapper

    "To govern a republic, it is best to imitate the great god of nature, who does everything little by little, almost unobserved."
    - Nicolò Vito di Gozze, Rector of Ragusa, On the State of the Republics

  11. #11

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    How is it going with the campagne map?

  12. #12
    Wallachian's Avatar Praefectus
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Quote Originally Posted by Athos187 View Post
    What century are these units supposed to be from? It says mid 14th century in the description but these guys are wearing sallets, armets and barbutes from the early to late 15th century
    The mod goes from 1345 to 1530. Each unit appears according to the time period. You may notice some units have two upgrades, one for XIVth century and one for XVth century. Some units dont appear until specific events or dates pass.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Beautiful, I hope you release this piece of work already.

  14. #14
    Julio85's Avatar Semisalis
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Torino, Italy
    Posts
    440

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Woooooow

    It is always great read and admire a Tsardom Faction Preview!

  15. #15
    Dead*Man*Wilson's Avatar Senator
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Heaven or Hell
    Posts
    1,097

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Wondrous. These previews make you want to try every faction.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Nice to see something new from this mod. Very well made and researched roster as always, love the pavise crossbowmen and ducal guard especially, they really look very flashy.
    Btw how far along are you guys in terms of faction unit rosters generally?

  17. #17
    Wallachian's Avatar Praefectus
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Thank you. All the unit rosters for all the factions are done, they have actually been done for about a year. We have a new team member working on reskinning some units for the new croatian faction. But other than that no more work is needed for units generally.

  18. #18
    Dusan Silni's Avatar Tiro
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Belgrade,Serbia
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Quote Originally Posted by Wallachian View Post
    Thank you. All the unit rosters for all the factions are done, they have actually been done for about a year. We have a new team member working on reskinning some units for the new croatian faction. But other than that no more work is needed for units generally.
    Sorry for asking but when did in Tsardoms timeline Croatia exist? After they unified with Hungary 1102.they did not have their state until 1941!

  19. #19
    Svir@c's Avatar Libertus
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Subotica Serbia
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Wow ... Amazing! Really good work guys! Keep up ...
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    -Come not between the Nazgúl and his prey!- J.R.R.Tolkien, The Battle of the Pelennor Fields, The Return of the King

  20. #20
    Wallachian's Avatar Praefectus
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Re: Tsardoms Total War - FACTION PREVIEW: The Republic of Genoa

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusan Silni View Post
    Sorry for asking but when did in Tsardoms timeline Croatia exist? After they unified with Hungary 1102.they did not have their state until 1941!
    It is an emerging faction as part of Hungary. Just as Serbia has the Despotate of Serbia as an emerging faction. Technically, Ragusa was part of Venice, Bosnia and Moldova part of Hungary too. But we represent some of the vassal states as playable. Also at the start of our mod Croatia is in open rebellion and the king of hungary is actively campaigning against the croatian nobles.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •