Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 40

Thread: City Management Guide for EB2

  1. #1

    Icon4 City Management Guide for EB2

    Intro

    Back when I first started playing EB1 I found a guide for RTW called City Management Guide for Rome: Total War by MarekBrutus. I really loved this guide as it was the first one that went into detail on how the economy/city management side of the game worked. Later when I got MTW2 in anticipation for EB2, the first thing I did was google if Marek(or anybody else for that matter) had done a similar guide for MTW2. Unfortunately I couldn’t really find anything similar to that. Most guides concentrated on the combat side of the game(for obvious reasons). So when the first version of EB2 came out, there were some things in the game that I didn’t fully understand. So I started googling around trying to figure how some of the stuff worked. Sometimes I found the answers while at other times I did not. Over the years though I collected more and more info on the different mechanics and started to think about collecting it into a guide similar to Mareks. It took a long time but I finally decided it was time to get this out. It’s still not finished though! The reason I decided to release it this early is:

    1. Even though not finished I think it has enough content to be helpful to many players.
    2. I thought the release of EB2 version 2.3 would be a good time to release this since it’s such a big update and might bring more players in.
    3. I thought releasing the guide might motivate me to finish it in a more reasonable time.

    When I first decided to not just figure things out for myself but to actually try and turn it into a guide, I used the original guide by MarekBrutus as the base on which to build. Since RTW and MTW2 use the same game engine, many things from RTW worked the same way in MTW2. Of course there were differences too and EB2 further changed things up. The way I have gone about learning all the different mechanics was the same in each case. First I would read up how it worked in RTW using Mareks guide, then I would search through every forum I could find and try to figure out how that thing works in MTW2. Lastly(and most importantly) I tested if the things I read from Mareks guide and the internet actually work as they they say in EB2.

    One thing I found out very early on was that the forums are full of contradicting and erroneous information. Obviously there is a lot of correct information as well, but since I usually didn’t know anything about the subject it was hard to figure out which information was correct and which was not. Mareks Guide, being made for RTW, also included some incorrect information although to my surprise most of it was accurate even in EB2(of course the actual numbers would differ since EB2 devs have changed many of them to better suit their needs but the basic principles were usually the same). Because of all this I needed to test everything myself in EB2 to make sure what was true and what was not. In my guide I didn’t want to claim anything that I had not tested myself in-game(no matter how true I might think it is). Therefore(since the guide isn’t complete yet) in some parts of the guide I have explained how I think(or have heard) a mechanic works but I always specifically mention if I have not tested it yet.

    Of course I’m only one man and since I have worked on this for more or less since the first release of EB2(obviously very sporadically and lazily) it is possible that there are a lot of mistakes within this guide. Therefore I would welcome people to point out any mistakes I might have made, so I can continue to improve the guide in the future.

    Like I said, this guide is not complete yet and one of the bigger things missing is worth mentioning here. One of the new things in MTW2 was the addition of a new type of settlement. There are two settlement types in MTW2; cities and castles. In EB2 castles have been renamed to camps to represent some of the nomadic factions. When it comes to many of the settlement mechanics, the numbers differ for cities and camps. I have not tested camps at all which means that everything I say in this guide applies to cities only! I will (hopefully) add camps in at a later date. Also, throughout this guide I use the words city/settlement/province interchangeably. In all cases I’m referring to cities(not camps).


    Settlement Screen

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    The Settlement screen, where you build your buildings and train your units, gives you only the most basic information of that settlement: Income, Public Order(PO), Households(i.e. population) and Population Growth(PG). At the bottom of this scroll there are three buttons. From left to right these are:

    Show building browser - Useful for planning what buildings to get and seeing which buildings are even available to you(although note that there are some buildings that won't show here which makes things a bit more complicated).
    Ask advisor for recommendation… - I think this one is disabled in EB2.
    Show settlement details - Opens the Settlement Details screen.

    Settlement Details Screen

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    To get a better understanding of your settlements you have to open the Settlement Details screen. This screen gives a more detailed account of everything that's going on in your settlement. This is the most important screen for managing your cities and the majority of this guide consists of explaining everything you see in this screen. It’s divided into four main parts:


    1. Population Growth(PG) - the total growth rate of the city.
    2. Public Order(PO) - how happy the population is. If this dips below 75% you will start getting riots.
    3. Income - how much money the city is making for you. Some sources of income and expenses are not shown here but are instead found in the Financial Overview screen(more on that later).
    4. Culture - the total culture of your settlement.


    Each of these parts consists of two rows of icons. In each case the top row shows you the bonuses while the bottom row shows the negatives(this is indicated by the small + and - signs at the end of each row). At the right side you will also see the totals(top row minus the bottom row). Sometimes you might notice that some of the icons are transparent or blinking. These are warnings or notifications for the player that something is about to change in the settlement. The blinking icons mean that they are about to disappear. For example if you put a building in the build queue that reduces trade income, you will see that some of the trade income icons start blinking to indicate that once the building is complete, you will lose trade income. The transparent icons on the other hand mean that you are about get them. For example if you put a building in the build queue that increases law, you will see that a new transparent law icon will appear to indicate that once the building is complete your law will increase.

    At the bottom of the scroll there are also two buttons:

    Show trade summary for this settlement - This opens Trade Details screen that gives an even more detailed account of your trade income, we’ll go over this is later in the guide.
    Set this settlement to be the faction’s capital - Allows you to move your capital which can be useful in some situations.


    Population Growth (PG)

    Top row shows all the things increasing PG while bottom row shows all the things decreasing it. Each icon represents at least 0.5% PG.

    Positive factors:

    Food Import(represented by grain sacks) - Food import is basically health from RTW. It’s just been renamed. As of this writing food import is provided by only one building line: the granary(grain dole). There’s three levels of this building. They give the following bonuses:

    Level 1 = 1.5% PG
    Level 2 = 2.5% PG
    Level 3 = 3.5% PG

    There are also some governor ancillaries that can increase food import.

    Improvements(house with corn) This bonus comes from buildings other than granaries. So farms, some temples, some government buildings etc.

    Tax bonus(money bags with green arrow) – Low taxes give 0.5% PG


    Negative factors:

    Famine(skulls) – This is the main factor limiting growth in EB2. Famine is directly related to population level. The more population you have, the more you have famine. There is no way to permanently reduce famine, other than decreasing population. This is important to remember when you want to grow a city to a big size, as you need to overcome the famine via positive PG bonuses. There are some governor traits/ancillaries that can also increase/decrease famine(but obviously these only apply while that person is the governor). Famine at different city levels is as follows:

    Huge City (24 000 population) = -5.5% PG
    Large City (12 000 population) = -3% PG
    City (6 000 population) = -2% PG
    Large Town (2 000 population) = -0.5% PG
    Town (800 population) = 0% PG

    Whenever your population reaches the next threshold, a new tier of walls becomes available to build. Once built, the settlement officially becomes the next tier(Town -> Large Town etc). It seems like these walls have a hardcoded effect on famine(there's no mention of famine in the building files). I haven't tested this much, but as an example, when your Large Town reaches around 5700 population your famine goes up to 2%. It will still be at 2% when you reach 6000 pop. When you then build the next tier walls to become a City your famine will go back to 1.5%. I will have to do some more testing on this but the point is that you should build walls as soon as they become available.

    Plague(rat) - Sometimes you get plague in your cities. This can give as much as -10% PG and it blocks ALL trade income. It lasts around three turns. I have not tested plague very much so I can’t say much about how or why a city catches it, it might just be random chance(also once it happens, you can spread it to other cities with your infected units and agents). I have heard that health buildings would help you against plague(in EB2 health is renamed food import) but again I haven’t tested this so I can’t say how exactly that would help, if at all.

    Tax penalty(money bags with red arrow) – High taxes give -0.5% PG and very high taxes give -1% PG.

    Capturing a city - Although this isn’t part of the Settlement Details screen, I thought I’d include this here since it can still have a big impact on population levels. When you capture a settlement you get three choices:
    Occupy - no effect on population
    Sack - about 25% of the population is killed
    Enslave - about 75% of the population is killed


    Public Order (PO)

    Top row shows all the things increasing it while bottom row shows all the things decreasing it. Also note that each settlement has a basic public order level of 100% which is not visible. So you have to add that to the total from the two rows in order to get the right number. Each icon represents at least 5% PO.

    Positive factors:

    Garrison(soldier) - The presence of soldiers gives a garrison bonus that can go all the way up to 60% PO. The higher the population of the city, the more soldiers you need to get the same amount of garrison bonus. If you come from EB1 then there is one big difference when it comes to garrisons. Unlike in RTW where every unit counted the same for garrison purposes, in MTW2 some units are considered peasants(they have the “is_peasant” tag in the files) and only count as half when it comes to garrison bonus. Now unfortunately the in-game unit cards don’t show whether the unit has this tag or not. So in order to know whether a unit is peasant or not, you need to either check the EDU file yourself(quite annoying and time consuming) or use the Recruitment Viewer(way easier and faster to check).

    Here is the equation for Garrison bonus:

    GPO = S / P * 750 / US

    Where:

    GPO = Garrison Public Order
    S = Number of soldiers in the garrison(remember to halve the number of soldiers in any peasant units)
    P = Population of the city
    US = Unit Size modifier(normal = 1, large = 1.5, huge = 2)

    Note that this is not a perfect equation but simply the best I have come up with and the result is in any way rounded to the nearest 5% in game(and the rounding principles seem a little weird sometimes). Therefore it is possible that the equation gives an answer that is off by 5%. If you get results that are more than 5% off, please tell me so I can take a look.

    If you want to figure out how many men you need to get x% garrison bonus, use this equation instead:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    S = 1 / 750 * GPO * P * US

    Where:

    S = Number of soldiers you need
    GPO = the amount of Garrison Public Order you want
    P = Population
    US = Unit Size modifier(normal = 1, large = 1.5, huge = 2)

    For convenience, here's the results for getting max garrison bonus(60%) at different city levels using huge unit size:

    Huge City (24 000 population) = 3840 soldiers
    Large City (12 000 population) = 1920 soldiers
    City (6 000 population) = 960 soldiers
    Large Town (2 000 population) = 320 soldiers
    Town (800 population) = 128 soldiers


    Law(scales) – Law bonuses are given by certain buildings(like strategic fortifications, port garrisons, temple of governors etc). There are also some buildings that give a penalty to law(this is shown in the building card as +-X). Note however that the total law of a settlement can never be negative(so you will never see law in the bottom row). This means that if your city has 0% law and you build a building with -5% law, you would still have 0% law(so no effect on PO). If you were to then build another building with 10% law you would now have 5% law in the city.

    Law is also used for fighting corruption but we’ll talk about that later in the guide.

    Buildings of entertainment, fun, culture and the maintenance of good order(house with a flag) – Commonly known as just happiness. Happiness bonuses are given by many buildings including theatres and most temples. There are also some buildings that give a penalty to happiness but just like law, the total happiness can never be negative.

    Governors influence(scroll/papyrus with a star) - This is given by certain governor traits. A very rare effect in EB2. At the time of this writing it’s mainly just used on Carthage faction leader and faction heir traits(it’s called local popularity in the trait descriptions). One point of local popularity gives 5% PO.

    Tax bonus(money bags with green arrow) - low taxes give 15% PO.

    Games/Races(happy and unhappy mask) - Some of the higher level theaters give the ability to throw games/races. The player can then set how often he wants to have these. This gives the following bonuses:

    Yearly = 0% PO
    Monthly = 20% PO
    Daily = 30% PO

    Of course you have to pay for the monthly and daily games/races. The exact prices are listed later in the guide.

    Food Import(grain sacks) - In addition to increasing population growth, food imports also give a bonus to public order. There are three levels in the granary building line(which is currently the only building giving food import) giving the following bonuses:

    Level 1 = 10% PO
    Level 2 = 10% PO
    Level 3 = 20% PO


    Negative factors:

    Famine(skulls) - In addition to reducing population growth, famine also reduces public order. As mentioned in the PG section, famine is directly related to population level. The more population you have, the more you have famine. You get approximately 5% famine for every 3000 population. This is not an exact calculation plus the game rounds the number to the nearest 5%. Famine at different city levels is as follows:

    Huge City (24 000 population) = -40% PO
    Large City (12 000 population) = -20% PO
    City (6 000 population) = -10% PO
    Large Town (2 000 population) = 0% PO
    Town (800 population) = 0% PO

    There is no way to permanently reduce famine, other than decreasing population. This is important to remember when you want to grow a city to a big size, as you need to overcome the famine via positive PO bonuses.

    Distance to capital(wheel) - Determined by the distance to your capital city. The farther the city is from your capital, the bigger the penalty. This seems to be capped at -60% PO.

    No governance penalty(scroll/papyrus with a red cross) – If you have no military units in the city you get -45% PO.

    Tax rate penalty(money bag) – High taxes give -25% PO, Very High taxes give -50% PO.

    Unrest(pitchfork on flame) - Unrest is probably the most complicated public order modifier in the game. There are tons of different things affecting it including faction specific events/missions. In this guide I won't be going over any faction specific stuff. The first thing we should cover is the different types of unrest. By this I mean that not all the unrest in the game behaves the same. There are three basic forms of unrest as I see it. Governor/agent unrest, temporary unrest and base unrest. Governor/agent unrest is simply the unrest you get from agents and governors traits/ancillaries/loyalty and it is only applied while the governor/agent is in the city. Temporary unrest is the most common type of unrest and as the name implies it is temporary meaning that once you get it, it will decay at a rate of 5% per turn until it is gone. Base unrest represents the reluctance of the population to being ruled by foreign powers. Every single settlement has a base unrest value set in the files. This can be anything from 10% to 100% and unlike temporary unrest, this does not go away. However, base unrest does not apply to “home” provinces. So if you are playing as Rome, you won’t get base unrest in your starting provinces but if you were playing as Carthage and you took over Capua(one of the Roman starting provinces), you would get the base unrest. The total unrest in a city is capped at 80%, although the game does still keep track of the true unrest value which might sometimes confuse players as it might seem like the temporary unrest is not decaying but this is just because the true unrest is above 80% so you can’t see the change.

    Things that cause unrest:


    1. Settlement base unrest
      • Here's a map that shows the base unrest of all the provinces(open in new tab to see full size image):
        Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
        As you can see, there are two outliers when it comes to base unrest; Ptolemais-Akko with 75% and Albabagenna with 100% base unrest. In the latter case it means the base unrest is higher than the maximum unrest(80%). This means it's practically impossible to reduce unrest here, since you would need -25% unrest from your governor just to get it down to 75%(5% reduction).

    2. Initial settlement turmoil
      • A few settlements start the game with some temporary unrest:
        • Korinthos = 60%
        • Pella = 40%
        • Persepolis = 25%
        • Shardin = 20%
        • Ariminum = 15%
        • Pantikapaion = 15%
        • Arpi = 10%
        • Arretium = 10%
        • Korsim = 10%

    3. Major and minor city unrest
      • There are some major and minor cities that will give you extra unrest whenever you conquer them. This is in the form of temporary unrest and it won’t apply to the founder faction. So for example if you’re playing as Romani and lost Rome to an enemy faction but then take it back you wouldn’t get this unrest since you’re the founder faction of Rome. If on the other hand you were playing as Epeiros and took Rome you would get this extra unrest. Here's the list of cities:
        Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
        Roma, Capua, Kart-Hadast, Gader, Pella, Demetrias, Ambrakia, Epidamnos, Athenai, Korinthos, Seleukia, Antiocheia, Tarsos, Alexandreia, Membhis, Diospolis-Megale, Baktria, Oskobara, Armavir, Shamushat, Amaseia, Trapezous, Bibracte, Gergouia, Maidunon, Turgi, Nertobriga, Kapidava, Kabula, Maryab, Pergamon, Taksashila, Pantikapaion, Paniardis, Sekeiza, Kontrebia

    4. Taking a settlement
      • When you conquer a settlement you get three choices: Occupy, Sack and Enslave. Occupy gives 30% temporary unrest, sacking gives -20% temporary unrest and enslaving gives -40% temporary unrest. So sacking and enslaving actually decrease unrest(but being temporary unrest this “bonus” decays as explained previously). See the example below.

    5. Enemy spies
      • I have heard that spies can also cause unrest when they are inside an enemy city. Apparently it’s 5% unrest for every point of subterfuge while the spy is in the city. I have not tested this.

    6. Governor traits and ancillaries
      • Some traits and ancillaries can also cause(or reduce) unrest. Obviously this will only last as long as the governor is in the city.

    7. Governor Loyalty
      • The loyalty of the governor also affects unrest. The lower the loyalty, the more unrest it gives.(This was added in 2.3 so I haven’t had time to test how exactly this works yet.)

    8. Some other stuff
      • There are a whole bunch of other stuff like faction specific events etc that can also give unrest. I won’t be listing these.


    Example on base unrest and capturing settlements:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    As Romans, you take Patava. Patava has base unrest of 30% and the founder faction is getai. Once you take it, you choose to enslave it. This gives -40% temporary unrest. The city is now at -10% unrest. You can’t actually see negative unrest in-game, just like you can’t see any unrest that is above 80%. So at this moment it would seem like the city has no unrest at all. Let’s say the governor you installed increases unrest by 5%. You would now be at -5% unrest. You wait one turn and you are now at 0% unrest(since the temporary unrest “bonus” is decaying). You wait one more turn and are at 5% unrest(so this is the first time you can actually see the unrest in the Settlement Details Screen). And so the temporary -40% unrest is just gonna decay every turn until it’s gone and you find yourself at 35% unrest(30% base unrest + the 5% from your governor).


    Civil Unrest(black and white mask) - If you’re coming from EB1 and are not familiar with the addition of religion into MTW2, I suggest checking the culture section later in the guide and then coming back here. Civil unrest is directly related to your settlements culture percentage. The lower it is, the higher the civil unrest penalty. This is capped at -50% PO and goes away entirely if you get your culture % high enough.

    Your governor’s influence can reduce the civil unrest penalty. For a more detailed look at civil unrest and how much governors can affect it, check the appendix.

    Governors traits/ancillaries - Your governors traits and ancillaries can affect PO by increasing/decreasing law, happiness, food import, famine or unrest. These are shown in the appropriate sections.


    Income

    Top row shows gross income, while bottom row shows expenses. Note that this section doesn’t actually show all the incomes and expenses in the game. The ones that are not shown here will instead be found in the Financial Overview screen which we will go over later in this guide.

    Positive factors:

    Local production/farming(house with corn) - Farming gives you income according to the total farming level of the settlement. Each settlement has a base farming level of 1 which is modified by buildings/traits/ancillaries. The total income is then modified by your campaign difficulty and harvest quality. At normal difficulty and average harvest, each farming level is equal to 160 income. The harvest quality goes from poor->average->good->excellent. You can see what the harvest quality is by hovering over the farming income icon(or via the Trade Details screen). All provinces have average harvest at turn 1. After the first turn harvest can change randomly. Season doesn't seem to affect it(you can get excellent harvest even in winter turn) and it can change more than one "step" in one turn(so you can go from poor harvest this turn to excellent next turn). Also, while there are buildings/traits/ancillaries that decrease farming level, the total farming level of a province can never go below 1. So in other words all provinces will always have at least some farming income, no matter how many maluses they got.

    The equation for farming income is:

    FI = 160 * FL * H * CD

    Where:

    FI = Farming Income
    FL = Farming Level(so 1 + all the upgrades from buildings/traits/ancillaries)
    H = Harvest (poor = 0.95, average = 1, good = 1.0375, excellent = 1.08)
    CD = Campaign Difficulty (easy = 1.2, normal = 1, hard = 0.92, very hard = 0.85)

    Note that this is not a perfect equation and so you should not take the results as anything more than approximations. As an example, let’s say you have a settlement with buildings giving you a +3 to farming. At very hard difficulty and with excellent harvest, the equation would say you had a farming income of 160 * (1 + 3) * 1.08 * 0.85 = 587.52. Whereas if you were to check this in-game, you would see that it’s actually only 586.

    For a table showing the actual in-game farming income at some of the lower farming levels see the appendix.

    Taxes(moneybags) - Tax income is affected by population, tax level and campaign difficulty.

    Hard campaign difficulty gives around 4-8% less taxes compared to normal difficulty while very hard gives around 8-15% less taxes compared to normal difficulty. I have not tested easy difficulty yet. These numbers are not the most accurate since it also depends on the population of the settlement.

    The effects of tax levels are as follows:

    Low Taxes = -20% tax income compared to normal
    High Taxes = +20% tax income compared to normal
    Very High Taxes = +50% tax income compared to normal

    To get a good overview of how population affects taxes at different difficulty levels, see the appendix.

    Basically the higher your population, the more pop you need to get the same increase in taxes. Also, you will immediately see a weird dip in tax income. In normal difficulty this happens as you come close to 8k pop. At 7905 population you get 1300 tax income(at normal tax level) but once you go up one pop to 7906 your taxes drop down to 1138 and it won’t come back to 1300 until you have around 16 000 pop. The point where this tax drop happens changes with your campaign difficulty.
    This means that although taxes play a big part in your finances in the early game, they should lose on importance later on when cities get bigger. I assume this is done to encourage players to look for other income sources(especially trade).

    Mining and metallurgy(pickaxe) Not all settlements have mining income. Mining is restricted to only those settlements that have at least one minable resource in them as this is required to build the mine building. Once a mine is build you get a steady mining income that is not affected by campaign difficulty and the only factors that can change it during the game are governor traits/ancillaries and the bonus from the mine building(the level two mine gives a bigger mining bonus).

    All the resources in the game are represented in the campaign map by little models. You can hover over these to see what they are. Some of these resources are considered minable. You need at least one minable resource in the settlement in order to be able to build a mine. Each resource has a trade value which is used in the equation for mining income. For the minable resources, the trade values are:

    Gold = 10
    Gems = 8
    Silver = 7
    Tin = 5
    Copper = 5
    Lead = 5
    Iron = 4
    Marble/Granite = 3

    Mining bonuses(level 1 mine/level 2 mine):

    Gold = 7 / 12
    Silver and Gems = 5 / 9
    Everything else = 3 / 5

    The equation for mining income is:

    MI = 5 * MB * TV

    Where:

    MI = Mining Income
    MB = Mining Bonus
    TV = The combined Trade Value of all the minable resources that the settlement has

    IMPORTANT NOTE: If the settlement has resources with different Mining Bonuses, then you must use the highest Mining Bonus in the equation to get the right answer. This is the reason why in some settlements you can see two or three different mining incomes in the mine building card(the highest one is the one using the highest Mining Bonus and this is the correct one, the other numbers are the results of using the lower Mining Bonuses in the equation).

    Let’s take an example:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Town A has the following resources:

    1 silver
    1 iron
    3 copper
    4 lead

    It has a level 1 mine. Since it has resources with different mining bonuses(5 for silver, 3 for the other) we need to use the highest one which is 5 for silver. The total trade value of all the resources is 46. So the total mining income is:

    5 * 5 * 46 = 1150


    Trading income(horse cart) - Trade, in EB2, is the selling of resources a city has, to cities that don’t have those resources.

    Trade income is probably the most complicated type of income in the game. I haven’t figured out any kind of formula for calculating this but I can give some insight into all the things that affect it.

    The Settlement Details screen gives only the total trade income of your settlement. To get a more detailed breakdown of trade income, you need to open the Trade Details screen:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    The Trade Details screen lists all the cities you are trading with divided into three parts: “Land Trade(Imports and Exports)”, “Sea Imports” and “Sea Exports”. The resource icons show which resources are being traded and on the right side is the total trade income from that city. At the bottom of the screen is the total trade income from all the cities. Weirdly, below that you can also find the farming and mining income as well as the total income from trade, farming and mining combined. I’m not exactly sure why these are in the Trade Details screen or why it only includes farming and mining but not other forms of income(like taxes).

    A small note about total trade income as reported by Trade Details screen vs Settlement Details screen:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The total trade income reported in the Trade Details screen is not correct! If you compare it to the total trade income in the Settlement Details screen you will notice that there the total is around 75% of what it is in the Trade Details screen. The Settlement Details screen is the correct one!


    Let’s first look at who can a city trade with:

    1. A city cannot trade with an enemy city(so no trading with the eleutheroi for example).
    2. In land trade, a city can trade with all cities it shares a land border with.
    3. In sea trade, you are limited by the amount of trade fleets you have. Each trade fleet(which you get from port buildings) allows you to sell your resources to one city. This gives you export income while also giving the other city import income. The player cannot choose where to send his trade fleets, instead the game sends them automatically to the most profitable cities. Only restriction is that they cannot be send to cities with which your city shares a land border with(since you are already doing land trade with them). Although sea export is limited by the number of trade fleets you have, sea imports don’t require you to have trade fleets, only that somebody else send their trade fleets to your city. As far as I can tell there is no limit on the number of sea imports a city can have.
    4. While trading, a city cannot sell a resource that the other city also has.


    Example 1(land trade):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Town A has 1 olives and 1 amber resource.
    Town B has 1 olives and 1 amber resource.
    Town C has 1 warhorse and 1 amber resource.

    Towns A and B can both sell olives to town C. Just because town A is selling olives doesn’t mean that Town C now has olives, so any number of towns could sell olives to town C quite comfortably.
    Town C can sell warhorses to both town A and town B. Just because Town C is selling their one warhorse resource to town A doesn’t mean that they now don’t have warhorses. A city can sell their 1 resource to every city it is trading with(assuming the trading city doesn’t already have that resource).
    None of the towns can sell amber to each other.


    Example 2(sea trade):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Town A has 1 spices and 1 honey resource and no trade fleets.
    Town B has 1 salt and 1 honey resource as well as a building that gives 1 trade fleet.
    Town C has 1 slaves and 1 honey resource well as a building that gives 2 trade fleets.

    Town C has two trade fleets and(since there are only two other cities in this example) sends them to towns A and B. This gives town C export income from the two cities for selling slaves to them(Can’t sell honey since both towns have it).

    Town B has one trade fleet and so the game picks the most profitable city to trade with. Let’s say it sends the trade fleet to town A. This gives Town B export income from town A for selling salt(can’t sell honey). Town B also gets import income for the slaves that town C sent here.

    Town A has no trade fleets and so can sell none of its resources overseas. It does however get import income from both town B(salt) and town C(slaves).


    Sea Imports

    Before we go over all the things affecting trade income, we should mention sea imports as they work differently than other trade income. Sea imports are always 20% of exports. So in the sea trade example above, if the trade fleet that town B sent to town A gives 1000 export income, then town A would get 200 import income(0.2 * 1000 = 200). There is nothing that can increase sea imports other than increasing the export income. Note that this rule does not seem to apply to land imports. This has lead me to believe that there might not be any land import at all in the game(despite the fact that the Trade Details Screen clearly says “Land Trade(imports and exports)”).

    Things that affect trade income:

    1. The number and type of resources both cities can sell to each other
      • How many of each resource you have and their trade value
      • How many of each resource the other city has and their trade value
      • Remember you can’t sell resources that the other city also has.

    2. Land vs Sea
      • Sea trade is more profitable than land trade.

    3. Distance
      • I have only tested this in sea trade(and even there only very briefly). It seems that the distance is measured from port to port. And the shorter the distance, the bigger the bonus.
      • I have a feeling that distance is not applied to land trade at all but I'll have to test this more.

    4. Population of both cities
      • How the population is distributed between the cities doesn’t matter. It’s the combined population of both cities that is used as a modifier for increasing both cities trade income.

    5. Trade bonuses from buildings
      • There are several different trade bonuses that buildings can have. I will go over these bonuses later in the guide.

    6. Trade bonuses from the governor’s traits and ancillaries
      • These increase/decrease land trade and sea export.

    7. Enemy forces
      • Enemy fleets can block ports and thus all sea trade.
      • I have heard that enemy armies can block land trade by sitting on the roads but I have not tested this yet(I’m sceptical of this since you don’t need roads to trade with neighbours. Maybe they don’t block all the trade but only the bonus you would get from the road building[see below]).

    8. Trade rights
      • Doubles sea export
      • Triples land trade
      • This seems to apply after all other trade bonuses


    Trade bonuses from buildings:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    There are three different trade bonuses that buildings can have:

    Improved roads and trade - This bonus is only available via the road building. This is also the most complicated of the three bonuses. There are three levels of roads. In addition to increasing trade this bonus is also responsible for putting roads on the campaign map(once you build the first level of roads) and increasing the movement range of units(each level of roads increases movement by a fixed amount). The trade bonuses on the other hand are more complicated. First off, this bonus only affects land trade, not sea trade(obviously). Second, the first level of roads does not affect trade at all(even though it has the same “Improved roads and trade” text). The second level increases base land trade by around 100% but with a few restrictions. In order to get this bonus the city you are trading with has to have at least level 1 roads. Furthermore, there has to actually be a road connecting the two province in the campaign map.

    Example 1:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Rome shares land borders with four other settlements: Arretium, Ariminum, Luceria and Capua(and thus is able to trade with them via land). We’ll assume all settlements start with no roads. You then build a level 1 roads in Rome. You will not get a trade bonus from “Improved roads and trade”(since level 1 roads don’t give any bonus). You then upgrade the roads to level 2. Again you will not get a bonus(since the neighbouring settlements don’t have at least level 1 roads). You then build level 1 roads in all the neighbouring provinces. Rome will now get the 100% base trade bonus to its trade with Arretium and Capua(which are connected via roads in the campaign map) but will not get any bonus to its trade with Ariminum and Luceria(since there is no road connecting these to rome in the campaign map).


    Similarly, the third level of roads increases base land trade by another 100% but requires that the city you are trading with has at least level 2 roads(and again you need an actual road connecting the provinces in campaign map).

    So in the example above, if you upgrade Rome’s roads to level 3 you would not get any bonus from the level 3 roads(since the other settlements only have level 1 roads). If you then upgrade all the neighbouring settlements to level 2 roads, Rome would now get the 100% bonus(for a total of 200%) to its trade with Arretium and Capua, but not Ariminum and Luceria.

    Trade Good Bonus: +X - The most common of the building bonuses. This bonus is found on many buildings including markets, roads, road garrisons, river ports etc. Each +1 increases trade income by approximately 10%. This affects both land trade and sea exports. Some buildings can also give a negative Trade Goods Bonus giving -10% trade for each -1.

    Trade Good Bonus: +X
    Trade Goods(above): Land Trade Bonus(+) or Malus(+-)
    - A rare bonus used in only a handful of buildings. Each +1 increases the base LAND TRADE income by around 100%(so basically the same amount as roads just without all the complicated requirements). So this does not affect sea trade at all. Some buildings can also give a penalty but the combined bonus from all the buildings in the city can never be negative. So if you had one building giving +1 and another giving -2, then you would get 0 bonus income from these.

    When it comes to the two latter bonuses, some buildings have further requirements to get these bonuses. As an example, level 1 roads, in addition to having the “Improved roads and trade” bonus also has the “Trade Good Bonus: +1”(land trade) bonus BUT you only get this in settlements that have salt or amber resource. Similarly, level one port, in addition to giving you 1 trade fleet, also has a “Trade Good Bonus +1” but you only get this bonus if you also have an Industry building in the settlement.


    Improvements(house with corn) This covers buildings that simply give a flat amount of income. This includes industry buildings and some government buildings. This modifier is also used in EB2 as a way to add building upkeep to the game(using a negative number). So some buildings have a negative “bonus”, for example most level one temples have a -50 income “bonus” on them. Note however that the total income bonus from “improvements” can never be negative.

    Some examples:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Example 1:
    Town A has a level 1 industry building. This gives 200 income from “improvements”.
    You then build a building with -100 building upkeep. You will now have 100 income from “improvements”.
    You then build a building with -200 building upkeep. You will now have 0 income from “improvements”(the total cannot go below zero).

    Example 2:
    Town A has no buildings that increase “improvements”.
    No matter how many buildings with building upkeep you build, your income won’t go down(the total cannot go below zero).

    Example 3:
    Town A has a level 1 industry building(+200 income).
    Town B has a building with -200 building upkeep.

    Town A will still give you 200 income, while town B would give you 0 income. So building upkeep can’t reduce the “improvement” bonus from other cities.



    Negative factors:

    Corruption penalty(moneybags with a hand) - Corruption is calculated as a percentage of your gross income(gross income = the total of the top row). How big of a percentage depends on the city’s law bonus and how far the city is from your capital. Cities that are very close to the capital won’t have any corruption but as they get farther away they start getting it. Corruption starts small at 1% of gross income but as distance increases so does the percentage. I assume this could go all the way to 100% of gross income but in EB2 corruption is capped at 1200 so you won’t see any higher corruption than that.

    To combat corruption you can move your capital to a more central location in your empire but you can also use law bonuses to help you. Each 5% of law decreases the percentage of gross income that corruption takes by 3.75 percentage points. So if the city’s corruption is 50% of gross income, then increasing law by 5% would knock it down to 46.25% of gross income. And conversely buildings with law penalties will increase corruption by the same amount. Also note that even though corruption is capped at 1200, the game still keeps track of the “real” corruption and so in some distant cities law won’t actually help at all since even with the law reduction the corruption would still be over 1200(so you won’t see any change).

    If you remember from the PO section earlier in the guide, the total law bonus of a settlement can never be negative. But although the PO from law can’t be negative, the game still tracks the total law in a settlement. And interestingly negative law DOES affect corruption. So if you have 0% law in a settlement and build a building with -5% law it WILL increase corruption. Also, if a city is close enough to the capital to not have any corruption, law penalties might be enough to introduce corruption there.

    Games/Races(happy and unhappy mask) - Extra costs for throwing games/races:

    Yearly = 0 (gives 0% PO)
    Monthly = 500 (gives 20% PO)
    Daily = 1000 (gives 30% PO)

    Devastation penalty(burning house) - I have not done any proper testing on devastation yet so everything here is just things I have heard people say or have noticed in my own games. Devastation is caused by enemy armies. It represents the army devastating the countryside, burning and stealing what they can. In game terms it robs you of your income. The amount of devastation is calculated as a percentage of your farming income. How high a percentage depends on how many “tiles” are devastated. Devastation is capped at 1200. Note that the percentage can go above 100% of you farming income so even with low farming incomes(like 320 for example) you can still get 1200 devastation if you let the enemy do its thing. I assume this means that each “tile” that gets devastated represents X% of your farming income and so the longer you let the enemy raid your territory, the more tiles will be devastated.

    Two important things about devastation. First, apparently the army has to not move in their turn in order to cause devastation. So if the enemy army keeps moving each turn, you should not get any devastation. And second, devastation can happen even across borders. This is probably the most confusing thing for new players who see their lands are devastated(devastated land is marked in the campaign map as burned ground) but can’t see any enemy in their territory. That’s because even if the enemy is on their side of the border, they can still cause devastation in your province. So it seems that armies have a sort of “raiding radius” and any enemy province that falls within that radius can be devastated. I don’t know how many “tiles” an army can devastate per turn or whether the size/composition of the army matters. Also once the enemy is stopped(like if you kill the army) the devastation doesn’t seem to go away instantly. But like I said, I haven’t really tested any of this.

    Governors traits/ancillaries - Your governors traits and ancillaries can further affect income by increasing/decreasing farming, tax, mining and trade income. These are shown in the appropriate sections.


    Culture

    MTW2 added religion into the game. In EB2 this has been renamed to culture. Each faction has a culture and some cultures are used by several different factions(since there is only a limited number of different cultures you can have in the game). This section shows your own culture on the top row and any foreign cultures in the bottom row. On the right side you can see the total culture percentage of the settlement(top row minus bottom row). This percentage can go from -100% to +100%.

    Things that cause culture to change:

    1. Settlements “founding faction”. Each settlement has a founding faction set in the files. For example Roma, Arretium, Ariminum, Capua and Luceria(roman starting factions) all have Romani as their “founding faction” and so will always drift towards the Romans culture no matter who owns the settlements.
    2. Settlements owner. If you own a settlement then it will slowly drift towards your culture. This bonus is the same amount as the “founding faction” bonus so if you take over a foreign settlement this will negate the “founding faction” culture conversion.
    3. Governors presence. If there is a governor in the settlement he will slowly convert the people to your culture. I would assume that all governors convert at the same rate, regardless of their skills, though I have not tested this.
    4. Neighbour conversion. It seems neighbouring settlements also affect the culture but I have not tested how this works exactly.
    5. Buildings. Some buildings convert people to a specific culture.


    How does culture affect you:

    1. Civil Unrest. Low culture % adds a public order penalty to the settlement as described earlier in the guide.
    2. Building restrictions. Some buildings require you to have a certain culture % before you can build them.



    Financial Overview

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



    1. Local production/farming
      • Total farming income as explained earlier in the guide.

    2. Mining and metallurgy
      • Total mining income as explained earlier in the guide.

    3. Trade
      • Total trading income as explained earlier in the guide.

    4. Merchant Trade
      • Total income from merchant agents. [Merchants are not used in EB2]

    5. Taxes
      • Total tax income as explained earlier in the guide.

    6. Wages
      • This covers agent upkeep as well as wages you need to pay for each family member and admiral.
      • 50 for each family member and admiral.
      • Agent upkeep costs are listed in their unit cards.

    7. Army Upkeep
      • Total upkeep cost of all your military units and ships.

    8. Recruitment
      • The amount of money you spent on recruiting units this turn.

    9. Construction
      • The amount of money you spent on buildings this turn. This can also be positive if you have demolished buildings this turn.

    10. Additional Income
      • Not sure what this includes.

    11. Diplomacy/Tributes
    12. Corruption and Other
      • Income column shows the money you get from capturing a settlement and the money you get from “Improvements” buildings(as explained previously in the guide).
      • Expenditure column shows the total corruption and devastation of all your settlements.
    Last edited by Poppis; November 04, 2017 at 01:17 PM.

  2. #2
    QuintusSertorius's Avatar EBII Hod Carrier
    Artifex

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,775

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Excellent work!

    Something to add to the Unrest section is the Troublesome Regions script. That's a know-able source of unrest that will be experienced by everyone.

  3. #3

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Very nice guide. Might want to mention something about the difference between Camps and Cities. The former does not allow you to make any changes in the tax rate, and "camp ports" use a completely different income mechanism than "city ports". Also, one of the new features of v2.3 is the "Pastoral Settlement" system (sort of a camp-city hybrid), so that might be something you want to talk about (after you've played around with it).
    EBII Council

  4. #4
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    4,180

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Hi Poppis, this is a stunning work, thank you!
    I've got a request: if I ever make something similar for the SSHIP, can I use your entry as a template?
    Second, is it really so easy with population growth in the EBII? I've written a guide for PG in the SSHIP and there're many more factors...
    JoC
    If you want to play a historical mod in the medieval setting the best IMO are:
    Stainless Steel Historical Improvement Project and Broken Crescent.
    Read my opinions on other mods here.
    ........................................................................................................................................
    Reviews of the mods (all made in 2018): SSHIP, Wrath of the Norsemen, Broken Crescent.
    Home rules for playing a game without exploiting the M2TW engine deficiencies.
    Hints for Medieval 2 moders: forts, merchants, AT-NGB bug.
    Thrones of Britannia: review, opinion on the battles, ideas for modding. No good mod yet, alas!
    Dominant strategy in Rome2, Attila, ToB and Troy: “Sniping groups of armies”. Still there, alas!
    .................................................................................................................................................................................
    Mod leader of the SSHIP: traits, ancillaries, script, historical improvements, fixes everywhere.

  5. #5

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Awesome guide, thanks! Learned a few things. I also have some notes:

    1) One thing worth mentioning is that the building browser is not a complete list of all the buildings that could be built in a province. Something guarded by an event counter condition won't even show up in the building browser until that's true. e.g. colony buildings that are limited by timers won't show up until they have points available (so hellenic, roman colonies etc, but not eastcols which don't have a trickle of colonist points restriction)


    2) The guide on farming income mentions a base farming level of 1 for all provinces, which might suggest we lack a mechanic for differentiating fertile provinces. But it's worth noting that provinces with the 'grain' resource get bonuses to their farming level. I believe the game engine will factor that in when showing you the farming level of a building in a particular province, but people might be surprised that the same tier of farm gives different level bonuses in different provinces and not realize it was tied to the grain resource.

    3) Yes, spies do cause temporary unrest. It's a great way as Parthia to get some land from the Seleukids without stirring up full war: incite revolt and take a city or two from the rebels.

    4) The mining section suggests the only thing that affects mining income was building the 2nd tier of mines. However there are both traits and ancillaries that gives mining bonuses...or penalties.

    5) The "Corruption and Other" part of the income summary should show devastation losses in the expenses column.

  6. #6

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Thanks for all the feedback and good words.

    Quote Originally Posted by QuintusSertorius View Post
    Excellent work!

    Something to add to the Unrest section is the Troublesome Regions script. That's a know-able source of unrest that will be experienced by everyone.
    I will have to take a look at that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kull View Post
    Very nice guide. Might want to mention something about the difference between Camps and Cities. The former does not allow you to make any changes in the tax rate, and "camp ports" use a completely different income mechanism than "city ports". Also, one of the new features of v2.3 is the "Pastoral Settlement" system (sort of a camp-city hybrid), so that might be something you want to talk about (after you've played around with it).
    Like I said in the intro, I have completely skipped castles(camps) in the guide for now for the simple fact that it's so much work, haha. Of course I would like to add them in(and hopefully WILL add them in eventually) but I will admit they are not high on my list of priorities at the moment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    Hi Poppis, this is a stunning work, thank you!
    I've got a request: if I ever make something similar for the SSHIP, can I use your entry as a template?
    Second, is it really so easy with population growth in the EBII? I've written a guide for PG in the SSHIP and there're many more factors...
    JoC
    You can use it however you like, it's made for the community to use after all. Besides it's based on the guide by MarekBrutus anyway.

    About pop growth, I glanced over the post you linked. I assume you are familiar with the descr_settlement_mechanics.xml file. If so, I can tell you that out of all the SPF factors, the only ones used in EB2 are:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    SPF_HEALTH
    SPF_BUILDINGS
    SPF_TAX_RATE_BONUS
    SPF_SQUALOUR
    SPF_PLAGUE
    SPF_TAX_RATE_PENALTY


    All the other ones are set to 0.0. So I'm guessing your mod uses more of those factors thus making it more complicated.

    Quote Originally Posted by myarta View Post
    Awesome guide, thanks! Learned a few things. I also have some notes:

    1) One thing worth mentioning is that the building browser is not a complete list of all the buildings that could be built in a province. Something guarded by an event counter condition won't even show up in the building browser until that's true. e.g. colony buildings that are limited by timers won't show up until they have points available (so hellenic, roman colonies etc, but not eastcols which don't have a trickle of colonist points restriction)


    2) The guide on farming income mentions a base farming level of 1 for all provinces, which might suggest we lack a mechanic for differentiating fertile provinces. But it's worth noting that provinces with the 'grain' resource get bonuses to their farming level. I believe the game engine will factor that in when showing you the farming level of a building in a particular province, but people might be surprised that the same tier of farm gives different level bonuses in different provinces and not realize it was tied to the grain resource.

    3) Yes, spies do cause temporary unrest. It's a great way as Parthia to get some land from the Seleukids without stirring up full war: incite revolt and take a city or two from the rebels.

    4) The mining section suggests the only thing that affects mining income was building the 2nd tier of mines. However there are both traits and ancillaries that gives mining bonuses...or penalties.

    5) The "Corruption and Other" part of the income summary should show devastation losses in the expenses column.
    1. Yeah I was wondering how accurate it actually is considering how complicated the buildings are in EB2.

    2. Yes, farms do give bigger bonus when there's grain in the province. You can of course see the difference by simply looking at the building card but it might be a good idea to mention it that it's the grain resource that's causing it.

    3. I suspected as much.

    4. Oh yeah traits/ancillaries. So traits and ancillaries can effect a whole lot of PG, PO and income that this guide covers. I purposefully left out most mentions of traits and ancillaries when I was frantically putting this guide up today, with the idea that I would add all the mentions of traits/ancillaries at the end of each section right before posting this guide. And of course I forgot to do that(although there's probably like some random mentions of traits/ancillaries here and there in the guide). I will add these tomorrow(hopefully).

    5. I will keep that in mind.

  7. #7
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    4,180

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppis View Post
    About pop growth, I glanced over the post you linked. I assume you are familiar with the descr_settlement_mechanics.xml file. If so, I can tell you that out of all the SPF factors, the only ones used in EB2 are:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    SPF_HEALTH
    SPF_BUILDINGS
    SPF_TAX_RATE_BONUS
    SPF_SQUALOUR
    SPF_PLAGUE
    SPF_TAX_RATE_PENALTY


    All the other ones are set to 0.0. So I'm guessing your mod uses more of those factors thus making it more complicated.

    2. Yes, farms do give bigger bonus when there's grain in the province. You can of course see the difference by simply looking at the building card but it might be a good idea to mention it that it's the grain resource that's causing it.

    4. Oh yeah traits/ancillaries. So traits and ancillaries can effect a whole lot of PG,..
    Most of my miniguide was related to the traits indeed.

    But the "Trade" issue is left out in the dark. Actually, I've couldn't find how does it work...

    I'm curious, however, in what sense "grain" impacts on the population growth through the granaries? If somebody can explain, I'd be grateful.

  8. #8

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Just income, not population growth, though you could probably make population growth dependent on it too if you wanted.

    Code:
            farms_five city requires factions { f_rome, f_carthage, f_makedonia, f_epeiros, f_kh, f_seleukid, f_ptolemaioi, f_baktria, f_hayasdan, f_pontos, f_parthia, f_aedui, f_arverni, f_getai, f_saba, f_saka, f_numidia, f_pergamon, f_gandhara, f_bosporan, f_arevaci, f_boii, f_nabatu, } and not building_present hinterland_pastoral_city and building_present_min_level govrome provinc or building_present_min_level govcarthage carthage_kleruch or building_present_min_level govkh kh3 or building_present_min_level govhayasdan hay_satrap or building_present_min_level govparthia parth_pbm or building_present_min_level govaedui aedui_mig or building_present_min_level govarverni arverni_mig or building_present_min_level govgetai getai_pettyking or building_present_min_level govsaba saba_clients or building_present_min_level govsaka saka_sat or building_present_min_level govnumidia numidia4 or building_present_min_level govgandhara gandhara_viceroyal or building_present_min_level govbospor bosptyra or building_present_min_level govarevaci arevaci_pact or building_present_min_level govboii boii_mig or building_present_min_level govnabatu nabatu_admin or building_present_min_level govbaktria baktria3 or building_present_min_level govmakedonia makedonia5 or building_present_min_level govpergamon pergamon5 or building_present_min_level govptolemaioi ptolemaioi5 or building_present_min_level govepeiros epeiros5 or building_present_min_level govpontos pontos5 or building_present_min_level govseleukid seleukid3
            {
                capability
                {
                    population_growth_bonus bonus 4
                    farming_level 5
                    farming_level bonus 2 requires factions { all, } and resource grain
                    happiness_bonus bonus -3
                }
                material wooden
                construction  10
                cost  8000
                settlement_min large_city
                upgrades
                {
                    land_reform1
                    farms_six
                }
            }

  9. #9

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Thank you so much!!!

    I've been waiting for a guide like this ever since I picked up EBII

  10. #10

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Very nice. By the way, is there a guide that explains why one should build temples other than the one that povides a law bonus and faster construction? Because at least on paper, that seems to be the best deal so far.

  11. #11
    QuintusSertorius's Avatar EBII Hod Carrier
    Artifex

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,775

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    There's no guide, but different temples trigger different traits/ancillaries for FMs present in the settlement.

  12. #12
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    4,180

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by athanaric View Post
    Very nice. By the way, is there a guide that explains why one should build temples other than the one that povides a law bonus and faster construction? Because at least on paper, that seems to be the best deal so far.
    Yes, indeed, this would also be very useful: description of pros and cons for building a particular type of temples and explanation/analysis when you should build that or another temple. The decision is taken very early in building-up a city so a player needs an overview beforehand.In the EB1.2 there was the Ludens guide to the temples - very useful.


    Myarta, I can't make out how the two following statements square:
    Quote Originally Posted by myarta View Post
    2) The guide on farming income mentions a base farming level of 1 for all provinces, which might suggest we lack a mechanic for differentiating fertile provinces. But it's worth noting that provinces with the 'grain' resource get bonuses to their farming level. I believe the game engine will factor that in when showing you the farming level of a building in a particular province, but people might be surprised that the same tier of farm gives different level bonuses in different provinces and not realize it was tied to the grain resource.
    Quote Originally Posted by myarta View Post
    Just income, not population growth, though you could probably make population growth dependent on it too if you wanted.
    So is the growth of population related to grain or not?

    What brings another question: how mechanic for differentiating fertile provinces work? Does it work only for the income (more money from provinces with grain - you've shown in the code)? Or is there mechanism making some provinces (with grain or through any other means) growing faster (and ultimately bigger) than the other?

    To be clear" the term "Food Import(represented by grain sacks)" is to be understood as "Import from the province to the city of this province" - as it has nothing to do with the other provinces? (you just build a granary in the city and that's all - while in the other mods it's also dependent (or thought to be dependent - even Gigantus is unsure) on the provinces that province trade with (by land or by the sea), ie. if they have (presumably) grain that's imported to the province).
    Last edited by Jurand of Cracow; October 20, 2017 at 11:20 PM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    What I was saying is that the EB2 building effects award extra farming_level to provinces that have grain, as shown here:

    Code:
                capability
                {
                    population_growth_bonus bonus 4
            farming_level 5
                    farming_level bonus 2 requires factions { all, } and resource grain
            happiness_bonus bonus -3
                }
    It looks like the line dependent on grain only affects farming_level, which I believe is only your income. The population growth bonus doesn't have any conditions on the grain resource therefore the growth rate is the same across all provinces who build this exact building, but the income level differs. It's possible you could make the growth bonus change too, by putting in a 2nd population line contingent upon having grain that adds an additional bonus. I haven't tried to mod that but it might work.

    And yes, the Food Import Poppis is referring to is the granary building and isn't connected to the trade system.

  14. #14

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    So is the growth of population related to grain or not?

    What brings another question: how mechanic for differentiating fertile provinces work? Does it work only for the income (more money from provinces with grain - you've shown in the code)? Or is there mechanism making some provinces (with grain or through any other means) growing faster (and ultimately bigger) than the other?
    No, the presence of grain has no effect on pop growth. Grain does have an effect on farming level, in that you get higher farming level bonus from farms if you have grain in the province. And farming level only affects income. This is how it works in EB2. In other mods, farming level can affect pop growth.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    To be clear" the term "Food Import(represented by grain sacks)" is to be understood as "Import from the province to the city of this province" - as it has nothing to do with the other provinces? (you just build a granary in the city and that's all - while in the other mods it's also dependent (or thought to be dependent - even Gigantus is unsure) on the provinces that province trade with (by land or by the sea), ie. if they have (presumably) grain that's imported to the province).
    Food import has nothing to do with other provinces or trade. You just build the building and you get the "food import" bonus. I know this might be a somewhat confusing to new players since it's called "import" which might suggest it has something to do with trade imports, but it doesn't(remember that food import is just renamed health, so it works the same as health). I might have to make this more clear in the guide.

  15. #15
    Tiro
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Logrolńo ( La Rioja)
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Excelent work! . I was going to say that once some Team members take a look to this guide and if they dont find "big errors" sticky this post to the upper side of the subforum? Since Quintus and Kull already said it looks like an excelent work.... there is my suggestion sticky this one?


    Talking about plagues, in my experience if famine is higher than population grow for XXX turns ( dont know the maths behind) in a settlement, that settlement is going to have "plague" sooner than later.

    If an army or character finish turn in a city with plague, theyll become ill and will have a plague symbol in their info screen, not sure about characters/armies moving inside a plagued city but not finishing turn there. If character they have a chance to die each turn and if army it will loose soldiers each turn till they "cure" from plague. I usually take out of the plagued city all characters and armies ( i leave only inside city the minimun amount of soldiers to avoid riots) and park the others just outside the city till they are "cured" + one more turn. I dont know the exact reason but if your character/army become cured one turn ( they loose the plague icon) and in that same turn you move them inside the city... the city will become plagued again and need to repeat "the process" to cure them. Of course any healthy character/army/unit merging with a plagued stack will become plagued next turn too. I have played some funny "NBQ" ancient wars with my spies spreading plagues in enemy cities.

    Regards:

    melvidh
    Last edited by melvidh; October 21, 2017 at 05:49 AM.

  16. #16
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    4,180

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Thank's Poppis and Myarta for your answers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Poppis View Post
    No, the presence of grain has no effect on pop growth. Grain does have an effect on farming level, in that you get higher farming level bonus from farms if you have grain in the province. And farming level only affects income. This is how it works in EB2. In other mods, farming level can affect pop growth.
    I'll have a look at this while playing but I recall a suspicion that it's somehow hardcoded (and maybe residual from RTW engine). I don't know where (in which file) it could be modded to switch it on and off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppis View Post
    Food import has nothing to do with other provinces or trade. You just build the building and you get the "food import" bonus. I know this might be a somewhat confusing to new players since it's called "import" which might suggest it has something to do with trade imports, but it doesn't(remember that food import is just renamed health, so it works the same as health). I might have to make this more clear in the guide.
    @Quintus, @Kull - maybe it'd be useful to change the name in 2.4 as it confuses - I suppose - also the other players? Just a thought.


    Quote Originally Posted by melvidh View Post
    Talking about plagues, in my experience if famine is higher than population grow for XXX turns ( dont know the maths behind) in a settlement, that settlement is going to have "plague" sooner than later.
    I think it's more complicated. "Health" plays an important role here. In EBII "Health" is... "Food import"?

  17. #17

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Very nice work! Very much appreciated (and tables too! cool!) - Bookmarked for later use.

    I've heard rumours that high influence Governors convert more culture than lower influence governors (or convert it faster). Are these just stories people have passed around, or is there some truth in it?

    Also, how would you best utilise this info in a roleplaying setting? I'm guessing if you can spot the ressources that foreign regions contains, you could choose which region to invade first, depending on their mining ressources and whether their ressources are different from you or not.
    The letter "D" on my keyboard sometimes fails to work. I usually notice it when it happens but some o slip through the net...

  18. #18

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    Thank's Poppis and Myarta for your answers.I'll have a look at this while playing but I recall a suspicion that it's somehow hardcoded (and maybe residual from RTW engine). I don't know where (in which file) it could be modded to switch it on and off.
    It is set in the descr_settlement_mechanics.xml file.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    I think it's more complicated. "Health" plays an important role here. In EBII "Health" is... "Food import"?
    More complicated, yeah... Everybody(since RTW times) keeps saying how health is important and helps you fight plague and squalor(famine) but I have never heard anybody explain how it does that. Personally I'm a bit sceptical about all this.

  19. #19
    Jurand of Cracow's Avatar History and gameplay!
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cracovia
    Posts
    4,180

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppis View Post
    It is set in the descr_settlement_mechanics.xml file.
    Well, I think I know the file pretty well, but I miss where precisely is the SPF related to grain? Or anything related to grain?

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppis View Post
    More complicated, yeah... Everybody(since RTW times) keeps saying how health is important and helps you fight plague and squalor(famine) but I have never heard anybody explain how it does that. Personally I'm a bit sceptical about all this.
    In the SSHIP forum we are quite convinced it does, although I haven't seen precise data. Maybe QS or Gigantus can confirm/reject?

  20. #20

    Default Re: City Management Guide for EB2

    Quote Originally Posted by Jurand of Cracow View Post
    Well, I think I know the file pretty well, but I miss where precisely is the SPF related to grain? Or anything related to grain?
    Oh I think I misunderstood you. There is no hardcoded relationship with the grain resource. It's just added as a requirement in the building files.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •