Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 71

Thread: [Preview] Bactria

  1. #1

    Default [Preview] Bactria

    Bactria








    Overview:
    The Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was – along with the Indo-Greek Kingdom – the easternmost part of the Hellenistic world, covering Bactria and Sogdiana in Central Asia from 250 to 125 BC. It was centered on the north of present-day Afghanistan. The expansion of the Greco-Bactrians into present-day eastern Afghanistan and Pakistan from 180 BC established the Indo-Greek Kingdom, which was to last until around 10 AD.

    Several important trade routes from India and China (including the Silk Road) passed through Bactria and, as early as the Bronze Age, this had allowed the accumulation of vast amounts of wealth by the mostly nomadic population. The first proto-urban civilization in the area arose during the 2nd millennium BC. Control of these lucrative trade routes, however, attracted foreign interest, and in the 6th century BC the Bactrians were conquered by the Persians, and in the 4th century BC by Alexander the Great. These conquests marked the end of the Bactrian independence. From around 304 BC the area formed part of the Seleucid Empire, and from around 250 BC it was the centre of a Greco-Bactrian kingdom, ruled by the descendants of Greeks who had settled there following the conquest of Alexander the Great. The Greco-Bactrians, also known in Sanskrit as Yavanas, worked in cooperation with the native Bactrian aristocracy. The Greco-Bactrians used the Greek language for administrative purposes, and the local Bactrian language was also Hellenized, as suggested by its adoption of the Greek alphabet and Greek loanwords. In turn, some of these words were also borrowed by modern Pashto.

    Diodotus, the satrap of Bactria founded the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom when he seceded from the Seleucid Empire around 250 BC and became King Diodotus I of Bactria. In 247 BC, the Ptolemaic empire (the Greek rulers of Egypt following the death of Alexander the Great) captured the Selucid capital, Antioch. In the resulting power vacuum, the satrap of Parthia proclaimed independence from the Selucids, declaring himself king. A decade later, he was defeated and killed by Arsaces of Parthia, leading to the rise of a Parthian Empire. This cut Bactria off from contact with the Greek world. Overland trade continued at a reduced rate, while sea trade between Greek Egypt and Bactria developed. Diodotus was succeeded by his son Diodotus II, who allied himself with the Parthian Arsaces in his fight against Seleucus II. Euthydemus, a Magnesian Greek according to Polybius and possibly satrap of Sogdiana, overthrew the dynasty of Diodotus I around 230-220 BC and started his own dynasty. Euthydemus was attacked by the Seleucid ruler Antiochus III around 210 BC. Although he commanded 10,000 horsemen, Euthydemus initially lost a battle on the Arius and had to retreat. He then successfully resisted a three-year siege in the fortified city of Bactra (modern Balkh), before Antiochus finally decided to recognize the new ruler, and to offer one of his daughters to Euthydemus's son Demetrius around 206 BC. Classical accounts also relate that Euthydemus negotiated peace with Antiochus III by suggesting that he deserved credit for overthrowing the original rebel Diodotus, and that he was protecting Central Asia from nomadic invasions thanks to his defensive efforts.

    Following the departure of the Seleucid army, the Bactrian kingdom seems to have expanded. In the west, areas in north-eastern Iran may have been absorbed, possibly as far as into Parthia, whose ruler had been defeated by Antiochus the Great. These territories possibly are identical with the Bactrian satrapies of Tapuria and Traxiane. Demetrius, the son of Euthydemus, started an invasion of the Indian subcontinent from 180 BC, a few years after the Mauryan empire had been overthrown by the Shunga dynasty. Some historians suggest that the invasion of the subcontinent was intended to show their support for the Mauryan empire, and to protect the Buddhist faith from the religious persecutions of the Shungas as alleged by Buddhist scriptures (Tarn). Demetrius may have been as far as the imperial capital Pataliputra in today's eastern India (today Patna). However, these campaigns are typically attributed to Menander. The invasion was completed by 175 BC. This established in the northwestern Indian Subcontinent what is called the Indo-Greek Kingdom, which lasted for almost two centuries until around AD 10.

    The Buddhist faith flourished under the Indo-Greek kings, foremost among them Menander I. It was also a period of great cultural syncretism, exemplified by the development of Greco-Buddhism. During or after his Indian campaigns, Eucratides was attacked and defeated by the Parthian king Mithridates I, possibly in alliance with partisans of the Euthydemids. In the year 141 BC, the Greco-Bactrians seem to have entered in an alliance with the Seleucid king Demetrius II to fight again against Parthia. Mithridates I managed to occupy territory between the Indus and the Hydaspes towards the end of his reign, Heliocles I ended up ruling what territory remained. The defeat, both in the west and the east, may have left Bactria very weakened and open to nomadic invasions. Around 140 BC, eastern Scythians (the Saka, or Sacaraucae of Greek sources), apparently being pushed forward by the southward migration of the Yuezhi started to invade various parts of Parthia and Bactria. The Yuezhi further expanded southward into Bactria around 120 BC, apparently further pushed out by invasions from the northern Wusun. It seems they also pushed Scythian tribes before them, which continued to India, where they came to be identified as Indo-Scythians. Around that time the king Heliocles abandoned Bactria and moved his capital to the Kabul valley, from where he ruled his Indian holdings. Having left the Bactrian territory, he is technically the last Greco-Bactrian king, although several of his descendants, moving beyond the Hindu Kush, would form the western part of the Indo-Greek kingdom. The last of these "western" Indo-Greek kings, Hermaeus, would rule until around 70 BC, when the Yuezhi again invaded his territory in the Paropamisadae (while the "eastern" Indo-Greek kings would continue to rule until around AD 10 in the area of the Punjab region). Overall, the Yuezhi remained in Bactria for more than a century. They became Hellenized to some degree, as suggested by their adoption of the Greek alphabet to write their Iranian language, and by numerous remaining coins, minted in the style of the Greco-Bactrian kings, with the text in Greek. Around 12 BC the Yuezhi then moved further to northern India where they established the Kushan Empire.

    This faction overhaul will be released with 1.2

    Units
    This faction overhaul adds 25 new units to Bactria, and also adds additional AOR units. Here are some pictures of the new units:

    Spear Infantry
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Bactrian Levies) Spears, shields and light armours were attributes of Bactrian warriors as noted by Herodotus. These men are drawn from lower parts of the society.

    (Bactrian Infantry) Equipped in typical Bactrian manner, these men form fierce infantry, although their light armours make them easier targets.

    (Greco-Bactrian Thureophoroi) Even though Greco-Bactrians were far away from the western Greeks, they were still fast to adapt to new changes in combat. Sculptures of soldiers armed with Thureos shields are a testimony to this.

    (Greek Colonists) Greeks were the most common western colonists in Bactria. They were settled in their own city-states and did not share their privileges with natives or even other colonists. Armed as typical hoplites, those soldiers fight in a phalanx.

    (Yavana Guard) The name "Yavana" was name given firstly to Greeks, later to all westerners in India. King Menander had his own group of these bodyguards and advisors that would accompany him at all times. Their equipment is similar to elite hoplites.


    Melee Infantry


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Bactrian Hillmen)
    These hillmen are bands of warriors from the various tribal clans native to the Pamir mountains of Bactria. They are fierce in battle but have poor equipment and are better suited for ambush tactics.

    (Greco-Bactrian Assualt Infantry) Exotic climate and animals were a shock for Hellenic troops but not enough to break their spirit. Curved swords, axes and heavy blades are perfect weapons to pierce thick elephant hide while light armour allows for better movement in difficult terrain.

    (Greco-Bactrian Thorakitai) Being one of the last independent Hellenic states, Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek kingdoms survived long enough to witness change in ways of combat. Armed with javelins and swords, clad in good quality armour, these soldiers can be relied upon on the field of battle.


    Pike Infantry

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Macedonian Settlers) Macedonian settlers were only a small part of Greco-Bactrian society. Their sole purpose was to fight among the ranks of the disciplined pike phalanx.


    Missile Infantry

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Bactrian Archers) These men are skirmishers only and not inclined to close with enemy troops. They are armed with a powerful composite bow and a long dagger suitable only for defence.



    (Bactrian Slingers) In battle, slingers are used as light skirmishers, troops with no armour or melee weapons but who rush forward against the enemy to pepper them with stones, only to flee when threatened.

    (Bactrian Javelinmen) Lightly armed javelinmen, these Bactrian warriors can harass and disrupt the enemy battle line.

    (Pisidian Settlers) Brought to India to settle in military colonies, Pisidians made an important part of the Indo-Greek armies. While they do not use much armour, their skills in skirmishing and melee combat more than make up for it.

    (Cretan Settlers) Renowned for their skill with the bow, Cretans were offered to settle in military colonies in India. Exceptional ranged abilities and good quality equipment make these men deadly of the battlefield.

    (Greco-Bactrian Peltasts) Peltast combat was similar to the Bactrian philosophy of combat. More like medium infantry then skirmishers, Greco-Bactrian Peltasts are solid troops that are perfect for supporting the heavier and slower phalanx.


    Cavalry

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    (Bactrian Light Cavalry) Light cavalry armed with spears and javelins. These native horsemen were once prized by the Persians and are now used by their new Greek rulers in the same fashion.

    (Bactrian Horse Archers) Light, ranged horsemen were the most common sight in Bactrian cavalry forces. They are not able to hold for a long time in close combat but if all goes well, they will never need to do resort to this.


    (Bactrian Cavalry) Bactrian horsemen formed the majority of Greco-Bactrian mounted units. They were the first sent to stop incoming attackers in order to buy time for rest of the army to assemble. While they do not use the best equipment, they are very fierce warriors.

    (Greek Citizen Cavalry) Greek settlers often fought as a cavalry force. They use similar equipment to their hellenic kin in the Mediterranean.

    (Greco-Bactrian Cavalry) The threat of nomads was always alive in Greco-Bactrian kingdom. Bows, long weapons and medium armour allow these men to combat the horse archers and heavy cavalry of their nomadic neighbours.

    (Greco-Bactrian Late Cavalry) As the threat of nomadic incursions increased over time, Greco-Bactrians had to adapt in order to counter the horse archers and cataphracts from the north and east. Their equipment got heavier but they still remain swift on the battlefield.

    (Yavana Heroic Cavalry) Indian sources mention a Greek cavalry unit, 3000 men strong and called them "Heroes among men". Their equipment is similar to that of the native Bactrians, consisting of javelins, swords and shields.


    (Greco-Bactrian Noble Cavalry) Bactrian nobility was employed in ranks of elite heavy cavalry since Alexander the Great added them into his Hetairoi and Agema regiments. Mixed origin riders makes for great versatility. Their trademark palm leaves are depicted on Bactrian coins.


    (Greco-Bactrian Cataphracts) During Alexander's conquest of the east, Bactrians often fought along nomadic cataphracts. Greco-Bactrians, accustomed with shock tactics of Steppe warriors, were able to field such units faster then other Hellenic kingdoms. While not as armoured as the classic Parthian cataphracts, these riders display the early evolution of cavalry into more heavy units.


    (Greco-Bactrian Heavy Cataphracts) These elite Baktrian cavalry are extremely heavy cataphracts borrowing from Parthian and Saka tradition and training. The combination of natural steppe skill and greek training ethos has rendered these men some of the finest horsemen in the known world.


    AOR Units

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    (Sogdian Axemen) Often hired to protect merchant caravans along the silk road, these soldiers wear native style dress and some are equipped with scythian armour. They wield large axe polearms to fend off cavalry and infantry.


    (Sogdian Archer Spearmen) These soldiers are equipped with recurve bows and short spears to counter mounted enemies on the steppes.


    (Sogdian Skirmishers) These men risk their lives by closing with the enemy while carrying only the lightest of equipment. Most armies use poorly equipped levies as skirmishers, very often as javelinmen, since these troops require relatively little training and financial investment, relying mostly on widespread natural skills and scant gear.


    (Sogdian Camel Riders) Sogdians are renowned traders that brave the long journey along the silk road between Bactria and China. They ride hardy Bactrian camels and use bows to fend of bands of steppe nomads that may try to take their treasures.


    Credits:

    - Some unit names and inspiration from the Europa Barbarorum/EBII team.
    - Helmet models: OSP - Open Source Project
    - Horse Armour: Avetis CIU Mod
    - Faction research, unit concepts and descriptions - KAM 2150

  2. #2

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Oh wow! I wasn't expecting Bactria to get any more attention due to them being kind of obscure, and already having a great variety of units anyway. Looks like my favourite hellenic faction just got the largest roster expansion for 1.2 to date...

    Best faction preview so far for me!

  3. #3
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Just a note, Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was the subject of my MA Thesis so this preview is pretty much made from military part of it

    I told this Diego mutliple times, but once again, I have to give him a big thank you for bringing my work to life. I wanted to do them justice, with strict differences between certain subjects of that faction and Diego was patient enough to change stuff constantly until we had the final result

  4. #4

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Really great work, I enjoyed reading this preview and ended up reading more about badass Yuezhi
    You could defenitley feel special love is given to Bactria, this roster is outstanding and one of the best in the game (obviously much better than silly Roman)), although their position in the corner of a map gives then huge advantage.

  5. #5

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Well the roster makes this look like one of the most interesting factions/regions in the game now, so congrats on this effort.

    What's funny to imagine is young people getting an interest in history who might google search "Bactria" or some other related term, could easily be met now with google images of the units from this mod - perhaps the exact ones listed above. It's an unexpected way to bring your college work to life for the world, but it's there for them to see nonetheless!

  6. #6
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Also some of the units are tied to the time they settled in the Kingdom, so for example Cretan archers will not be avaliable until Thorax reform since they and Pisidians were settled after campaigns in India.

  7. #7

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Quote Originally Posted by KennyTheKlever View Post
    Well the roster makes this look like one of the most interesting factions/regions in the game now, so congrats on this effort.

    What's funny to imagine is young people getting an interest in history who might google search "Bactria" or some other related term, could easily be met now with google images of the units from this mod - perhaps the exact ones listed above. It's an unexpected way to bring your college work to life for the world, but it's there for them to see nonetheless!
    If you will try to google in english for any units of Hayasdan roster researched and made by EB team, you will end up finding info on them in the whole internet somehow related to EB team's job.

  8. #8

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Wow, great work Kam!

  9. #9
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Quote Originally Posted by suras333 View Post
    Wow, great work Kam!
    Wow, great work Diego and Kam! - I fixed it

  10. #10

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Of all the new previews I like this one by far the most.

    Also, it seems that this time all of the units are really historical, so kudos for that.

  11. #11
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Well, I tried to be as true to sources as possible but in the end, every mod makes its own version of history and all of them are equally subjective view of the researcher. My main points were to show distinc differences between different nations that lived there and obvious military progression so they have plenty of units that can be upgraded into higher grade after certain reform. To be honest, ancient resources are so scarce that most of units take more liberties then people think. If we would go with full on accuracy, then most of armies would have pretty much light infantry, heavy infantry, skirmishers, light cavalry, heavy cavalry and that it all ; P
    Last edited by KAM 2150; November 25, 2016 at 03:00 PM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Pretty nice preview

  13. #13

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Looking good!

  14. #14
    Tiro
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Virginia, US of A
    Posts
    266

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Oh for crying out loud - this is like the 4th preview (at least) that has made me super excited to try a faction that I usually ignore. By the time 1.2 comes out, my crippling ADD is going to leave me paralyzed at the faction selection screen. How will I survive? ;-)

    On a more practical note, the presence of one pike unit (that looks awesome btw) makes me wonder.......is the number of pike units for Bactria going to be scaled back?

  15. #15
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Yes, they will just have one pike unit. Overal 1.2 will have much less pike units as some of them were redundant.

  16. #16

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Quote Originally Posted by KAM 2150 View Post
    Well, I tried to be as true to sources as possible but in the end, every mod makes its own version of history and all of them are equally subjective view of the researcher. My main points were to show distinc differences between different nations that lived there and obvious military progression so they have plenty of units that can be upgraded into higher grade after certain reform. To be honest, ancient resources are so scarce that most of units take more liberties then people think. If we would go with full on accuracy, then most of armies would have pretty much light infantry, heavy infantry, skirmishers, light cavalry, heavy cavalry and that it all ; P
    You did a very good job, from what I can tell.

    As for the rest of it, on one hand you are right, on the other... Well, there was quite a bit of distinction, especially in ancient times, in regards how people geared themselves for war, and how they conducted it.
    However, it is also true that none of that was set in stone, and IRL people would quickly adapt to new gear, new tactics etc.

    Generally, I do believe it is quite easy to get a considerable amount of different and distinct units, if you look at the game overall (and not every faction for itself).
    But then again, I for one, always prefered that there werent that many different units in a faction (well, less than most people seem to like, from what I can see).
    Also, I really liked how in Rome 1 many (most?) factions were HEAVILY geared towards a certain playstyle.
    So, for me, there is no need to have more than, let`s say, 10 units that are available to a faction, as long as they are original, fun to play, and stay competitive (through reforms etc.)

  17. #17
    Tiro
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Virginia, US of A
    Posts
    266

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Quote Originally Posted by KAM 2150 View Post
    Yes, they will just have one pike unit. Overal 1.2 will have much less pike units as some of them were redundant.
    That seems fine to me. There definitely seemed to be a bit of unnecessary overlap in the Successor Pike Rosters. Are the Native Pike units drawn from non-Greek populations going to be a reform unit by any chance? Having the cheap levy pike units available from the start always seemed counter intuitive based on my understanding of the political cost-benefits of non-Greek pike soldiers during those times.

  18. #18
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Only Egypt has native pikes avaliable from the Diadochi states, rest have either regular Macedonians (Macedonia, Epirus) oraz military settlers from Katoikiai system. At the moment, there are no levy pikes as regular pikes were...levies anyway ;P Maybe Macedon will get their lightly, poorly trained pikes later on but I guess there will be no reason to recruit them, especially will population system.

  19. #19

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Preview looks awesome KAM! Bactria was my favorite faction to play in EB, and I can't wait to give them a go once 1.2 releases. I also did a bit of research on the Bactrian Kingdom in my undergrad and I fell completely in love with it as a historical subject. If you don't mind, I would love to read your thesis if you are able to send it?

  20. #20
    KAM 2150's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    7,145

    Default Re: [Preview] Bactria

    Well, how good is your Polish then? xD

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •