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Thread: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

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    The Wise Coffin's Avatar History is the Future
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    Default Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster



    Greek settlers longing for a new hope at distant shores landed and in northern Libya founding the city of Kyrene, a name soon to be well known in Africa. At first having good relationships with the Libyan indigenous population, the Greeks soon violated them, expelled them from their lands with the help of their superior weapons. Further expeditions were started and finally the Libyans managed to stir up the mighty Pharaoh for a fight against the expanding city state, but even he lost against the proud Greek phalanx. However, no one is invincible and the citizens had to pay a terrible price for that lesson when thousands of their sons never returned from yet another expedition against the Libyans. Now they concentrate on economical strength, but that power can be easily translated into military power...

    The excellent economical basis of the state ensured rich and effective equipment for the typical Greek hoplites also let into battle by the Kings of Kyrene. Adapting, they chose to use even Egyptian techniques for their arms and armor. Also Egyptian influence is reflecting in their lifestyle, especially the religion seeing the absorption of the oracle god Amun as Zeus Ammon. Still, trade is the best source of income since Kyrene holds the iron monopoly on the mysterious Silphion-plant.


    The King of Kyrene has three different choices if he wants to expand further. In the south, there are the ferocious Libyans with their poor land, in the east, the mighty Pharaoh awaits, more than ready to crush Kyrene, but there is still another option, a naval expedition, to conquer many distant lands.



    | Hellenic & Lybia AOR |

    Dorikoi Hoplitai (Dorian Hoplites) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    Many years ago the chariot was the supreme weapon in Hellas, though with the improvement of smithing techniques better weapons and armor could be made, and slowly infantry made a comeback. Furthermore, as war became a less elitist activity (although there still is no such thing as a standing citizen army), more people could take part. Combined with the rugged terrain of Hellas, which made cavalry largely unfeasible, this brought about the rise of the phalanx. Contrary to popular opinion, the hoplites did not derive his name from the shield (which is correctly known in this period as the 'aspis') but from the general word for 'weapon' - 'hoplon'. Hoplitai fight together in a compact formation, forming a solid front with their large round shields and advancing slowly so as to maintain order. Their principle weapon is the xyston thrusting spear, though more often than not the victorious phalanx is the one that can push forward the hardest, and hold formation the longest. These are generally reliable infantry against most other infantry types, though they are hard to maneuver and are quite vulnerable to cavalry.

    Hoplitai are generally drawn from the higher strata of cities, and minor cities can often find their hoplitai being used as pawns by more powerful, influential cities. Sparta, for example, mostly filled her armies up with allied hoplitai, as her own troops were too valuable to waste.\n\nThe Dorikoi are one of the four major Greek ethnē into which the Greeks of the ancient period considered themselves divided, along with the Aioloi, Achaioi and Iōnes. They were diverse in way of life and social organization, varying from the populous trade center of the city of Corinth, known for its ornate style in art and architecture, to the isolationist, military state of Sparta. And yet, all Greeks knew which localities were Dorik, and which were not. Dorikoi states at war could more likely, but not always, count on the assistance of other Dorikoi states.

    Akontistai (Hellenic Javelinmen) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    The current military trends in Hellas are very much in favor of heavy infantry. Lighter troops and cavalry generally fall into very slim supporting roles, and often don't make an appearance on the battlefield at all. Very few people have looked into the possibilities of skirmishers, and few have studied skirmishing tactics in any detail. Thus the harassing role is left to the poorest sections of society who cannot afford the armor of a hoplite nor spare the time for the training. The Akontistes is, as a result of his lack of armor and his hard, hand-to-mouth farming lifestyle, extremely fast and well able to read the land and hide in long grass, but he suffers from poor morale. He is named after his javelin, the akontion, and this weapon can be quite useful, even against the well armored hoplite, though as his only side arm is a club, the Akontistes should stay away from melee.

    The concept of the skirmisher only really became popular in Greece in the Peloponnesian Wars in the second half of the fifth century BC, in his incarnation as the peltastēs, named after his shield, the peltē.

    Toxotai (Hellenic Archers) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    In much the same manner as the Greeks have not had much of a tradition for javelin troops, so they are not really accustomed to fielding powerful contingents of archers. The Toxotai are of much the same social status as the Akontistai, and have largely derived their abilities with the bow from hunting wild animals. Their name comes from the Greek for bow, 'toxon', and they have the potential to be quite useful in battle, though their bows aren't really powerful enough to make them worthwhile to use against hoplites. Greek bowmen are not up to the standard of their Asiatic counterparts, and the usual advice applies concerning keeping them away from the enemy. Even though they aren't the best archers, when used properly they are still an asset to an army.\n\nThe Greeks never really used their own archers that much at all, preferring where necessary to hire foreign mercenaries or conscript conquered peoples. Even leaders such as Epimanondas and Alexander the Great followed this practice.

    Thētes Sphendonetai (Hellenic Slingers) UNIT MADE BY THE BATTLE FOR HELLAS TEAM
    Thētes are manual workers or sharecroppers, they served voluntarily in the role of personal servant, or as auxiliaries armed for instance with the sling or as rowers in the Navy. Slingers are much valued by commanders for their ability to maintain a barrage on an enemy unit for long periods. They can supplement the ammunition in their satchels with the stones on the ground at their feet, so they are much less likely to run out than other missile troops. Using slings of varying length according to the range of their target, their shots strike home with a terrible impact which can knock a man back even if it strikes his armour. Other than a knife and the simple clothes they stand up in, they carry nothing to assist them in a fight at close quarters, preferring instead to retreat to the shelter provided by friendly infantry when such danger threatens.

    Hippikoi (Hellenic Cavalry) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    Again, thanks to the phalanx-centered nature of Greek warfare, and the mountainous nature of Greece (there are few large pastures), cavalry is not prominent. That’s not to say that it isn't used, but it is expensive and there aren't many men who can field horses from their estates. Greek cavalry are not poorly armored though - because horsemen have to be wealthy to afford a horse, they can generally also afford a cuirass and helmet, though the lack of stirrups means that their armor cannot be too heavy (the soldier would be more likely to fall off then). Hippikoi are typically used as advance scouts, skirmishers and strike forces, quick raiders who can lob javelins and hit a phalanx in the rear or the flank. Attacking a phalanx head on however is highly inadvisable, as the light Greek horses would not penetrate very far into the formation. Nonetheless, they are valuable troops, and their scarcity makes them highly valuable on the battlefield. Thanks to this scarcity though, they come in smaller unit sizes than most other cavalry.

    Temeh'u Khet (Lybian Infantry) Unit Made by the Bronze Age Team
    The Libyans settled as mercenaries in Temeh were a very important part of the Egyptian military ever since the early days of the civilization. These loyal and professional, yet expandable men are the cannon fodder in the first lines of the army. Their equipment is neither sufficient for engagement with heavy armored troops nor for fighting eastern archers. Nevertheless, the javelins can hit the enemy from distance and they can be used in close combat, while a leather shield offers minimal protection. Although they seem to be another outdated relict of the old Egyptian army, they have overcome hoplite armies on African ground more than once.

    The Egyptians divided the human race into four classes, namely the Egyptians (Kemet), the A’mu (Semites), the Neh’esu (Nubians) and the Temeh’u (Temehu) in the country Tmh’ (Libyans). The Neh'esu refers to all Africans bordering Egypt from the south, like the Ethiopians; the Temehu covers all Africans bordering Egypt from the west; and the A'mu are obviously the Semites bordering Egypt from the east (of the Middle East), like the Akkadians and the Phoenicians, whom originally were Saharan groups split from the Afro-Asiatic family around the 5th millennium BC.


    Tehen'u Wedi (Lybian Archers) Unit Made by the Bronze Age Team
    The Libyan mercenaries of Tehenw seem equally outdated as their Temeh counterparts, but again it is deadly to underestimate the striking power of these men. Even though only possessing the same obsolete bow like most Egyptian archers, the Libyan archers are a necessary missile back-up of the army. But their greatest value is again the fact that they are expandable in every way.

    The Egyptians divided the human race into four classes, namely the Egyptians (Kemet), the A’mu (Semites), the Neh’esu (Nubians) and the Temeh’u (Temehu) in the country Tmh’ (Libyans). The Neh'esu refers to all Africans bordering Egypt from the south, like the Ethiopians; the Temehu covers all Africans bordering Egypt from the west; and the A'mu are obviously the Semites bordering Egypt from the east (of the Middle East), like the Akkadians and the Phoenicians, whom originally were Saharan groups split from the Afro-Asiatic family around the 5th millennium BC.

    | Kyrene |

    Kyrēnaioi Hoplitai (Kyrenian Hoplites) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    The bulk of Kyrene’s military would be formed by the famed citizen infantry, called hoplites. A heavy wooden shield enforced by a bronze rim and blazon and bronze cuirasses in connection with closed bronze helmets has given them the reputation of men of bronze in Egypt and Libya. A fearsome sight and a terrible foe as they are, they soon became dominant in the Kyrenaika, they were the guaranty of victory against the Pharaoh and yet alone their presence can decide battles. However, their myth of invincibility has been scattered by recent defeats, so the enemy grew more confident.

    Kyrene owes its birth to a Greek Island named Thera in ancient times and which today is known as Santorini, located in the Southern Aegean Sea. As a result of the rise in population that took place in the Greek world during the 8th and 7th century BCE, the Therans became concerned about the effects of overpopulation and dispatched an expedition to the North African region. The traditional date for this event is 630 BCE. During the expedition, some citizens were relocated to an offshore island, not far from the North African coast. The natives that lived in Libya welcomed the newcomers and showed them an inland site more auspicious and the Greeks chose a spot marked by the presence of an abundant spring to found a new city.


    Epibatai (Kyrenian Marines) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    As a state located at the shores of a primary sea trade route and widely dependent on it, Kyrene had to maintain a strong naval force. The citizens of Kyrene were ready to defend their home and vital trade routes at sea, too, so they also mustered marine troops if necessary. They have adapted their arms to naval combat on ships using javelins instead of a thrusting spear and a sword for close combat. Although citizens rarely fight battles on land with marine equipment, it is a possibility especially when running large scale naval operations that include raiding parties devastating other powers’ coastlines.

    The name of the city is rooted in one of the many myths about Apollo’s love affairs with young women. In this case, Kyrene was the daughter of a Thesalian King named Hypseus and a water nymph. He took Kyrene to North Africa and they got married. The springs where the Greeks chose to found the city were identified as the domain of the Kyrene, hence the city’s Greek name Kurene.

    Hippeis Hoplitai (Kyrenian Heavy Hoplites) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    The horse owning nobility of Kyrene still loved their horses and they were famed for the beauty and power of their mounts. However, military developments had degraded horsemen to an auxiliary role in most Greek societies, including that of Kyrene. So these men, like many hippeis of many Greek states, fought on foot as hoplites. As a progressive elite, they were a lot more open-minded towards new developments in arms and armor, thus they use the new linen armor which is derived from Egyptian techniques. This kind of armor is as effective as bronze armor, but does not heat up and offers far better protection against arrows. The silphium plant, which made them rich and has become symbol for Kyrene, can be found very often on their shields.

    During the Greco-Persian wars, Kyrene (along with Egypt, Libya and Barke) became part of the Sixth Province of the Persian Kingdom during the time of Darius I. After this, Kyrene gradually gained political independence until it became a republic in about 460 BCE. During the Peloponesian war, Kyrene supported the Spartan army by providing them with ships and sailors.

    Epilektoi Kyrēnaioi (Kyrenian Elite Cavalry) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    The horse owning nobility of Kyrēnē still loved their horses and they were famed for the beauty and power of their mounts. However, military developments had degraded horsemen to an auxiliary role in most Greek societies, including that of Kyrēnē. So now the role to be in the elite cavalry goes only to a small group of rich nobleman, they are the most experienced and influent men in all of Kyrenaika. Being on horses these soldiers can't use the heavy shield that the hoplites use, so they go to battle without it.

    Several famous figures are recorded in history as coming from Kyrene: it was the birthplace of Eratosthenes, an important ancient Greek Alexandrian scholar. Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates was also born in Kyrene: The Kyrenaics, a famous school of philosophy in the 3rd century BCE founded by Aristippus, was based in this city. About 250 BCE, the Third Buddhist Council took place in India: Ashoka the Great, the famous Indian emperor who ruled form 268 BCE to 232 BCE, encouraged and supported Buddhist missions all over the Indian Mauryan empire and even beyond as far as Greece, Egypt and Syria. Kyrene is one of the many cities which received Buddhist missionaries.

    Basiliskoi (Kyrenian Royal Hoplites) UNIT MADE BY THE RISE OF PERSIA TEAM
    Like all dynasties, the Battiadai were in need of a loyal bodyguard. While the tyrants of mainland Greece often relied on mercenaries, the legitimate kingship of the Battiadai found enough acceptance among the people allowing them to form a mighty guard from loyal Kyrenian fellows. These handpicked men were equipped with the best arms and armor the rich state of Kyrene could afford. Due to the conservative nature many of these men had, this meant excellent, although slightly old-fashioned – but not outdated – equipment.

    Chosen not only for their loyalty, but also for their combat performance they provided reliable cover for the King during the battle and could act as shock troops creating or exploiting gaps in enemy lines. Their heavy equipment will protect them, but it makes them less mobile, of which a foe like the nimble Libyans can take advantage of. On their shield-blazons they proudly show off Zeus Ammon, a Kyrenian cult absorbing the Egyptian oracle-god Amun, which spread soon all over Greece.

    The city lost its political independence again during the time of the Ptolemaic dynasty, after the death of Alexander III of Macedon (323 BCE). Finally in in the year 74 BCE, the city became under Roman control.


    SWIFT REMINDER THAT ALL HORSE MODELS AND TEXTURES COMES FROM THE CLASSICAL AGE: TOTAL WAR MOD
    Last edited by The Wise Coffin; July 12, 2016 at 07:45 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

    Great work! I'm hoping that the Libyan units pack a surprising punch...

  3. #3
    Argive Strategos's Avatar Civis
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    Default Re: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

    Cool stuff, the royal cav and bodyguards are my favourite units, they look so badass

  4. #4

    Default Re: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

    Great Work!!! For the Kyrenian Elite Cavalry I believe it would be better to be with an other helmet rather than Corinthian or with a Petasos.



  5. #5
    demagogos nicator's Avatar Domesticus
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    Default Re: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

    Good looking rostrer

  6. #6

    Default Re: Rise of Persia 3.0 |PREVIEW| Kyrene Roster

    Nice looking units I can't wait for version 3 I might start as Kyrene for my first file I always thought it was an interesting location to start in

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