Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

  1. #1
    Roma_Victrix's Avatar Gatorade, is it in you?
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    12,620

    Default Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    1,000-year-old onion and garlic eye remedy kills MRSA

    This is rather funny, actually, considering how the heavy duty anti-bacterial medicines of modern science - penecillins and cephalosporins - are unable to kill the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus "superbug", yet this Anglo-Saxon recipe from the 9th century that includes cow bile does the job just fine. As the article explains, the ingredients by themselves seem to make no difference, but when used in tandem the mixture suddenly appears to kill roughly 90% of all MRSA it comes into contact with in lab tests. Whoever was curious enough to try medieval Anglo-Saxon medicinal concoctions should get some sort of reward for this (i.e. the microbiology researchers at the University of Nottingham where the British Library's Bald's Leechbook manuscript was translated from Old English into modern English). It was a bold move, Cotton, and it paid off.



    So what do you guys think? Do you think we should continue to scoff at medieval scientific claims, particularly those regarding medicine, given how they were largely ignorant about the natural world and most of their remedies were obviously ineffective (like bloodletting, for instance)? Or should we take them far more seriously when they present such remedies and test them out just in case?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Various traditional medicine claims are worth subjecting to scientific scrutiny at least once, for all the magical thinking, occasionally people stumble upon things via trial and error even if they have no clue about the real mechanism. Even chimpanzees self-medicate.
    Quote Originally Posted by Enros View Post
    You don't seem to be familiar with how the burden of proof works in when discussing social justice. It's not like science where it lies on the one making the claim. If someone claims to be oppressed, they don't have to prove it.


  3. #3

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Several years ago(2004), in the UK they stumbled upon a mix 4 essential oils(orange, grapefruit, lemon plus another). They diluted this with water, put it in an atomizer, sprayed a surface, and killed MRSA consistently.

    Any bacteria will survive an agent, pass along immunity, and create a potentially dangerous pathogen. It's inevitable. Mixing various agents means a potential to reduce adaptability.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15555788
    Abstract

    Patchouli, tea tree, geranium, lavender essential oils and Citricidal (grapefruit seed extract) were used singly and in combination to assess their anti-bacterial activity against three strains of Staphylococcus aureus: Oxford S. aureus NCTC 6571 (Oxford strain), Epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus (EMRSA 15) and MRSA (untypable). The individual essential oils, extracts and combinations were impregnated into filter paper discs and placed on the surface of agar plates, pre-seeded with the appropriate strain of Staphylococcus. The effects of the vapours of the oils and oil combinations were also assessed using impregnated filter paper discs that were placed on the underside of the Petri dish lid at a distance of 8mm from the bacteria. The most inhibitory combinations of oils for each strain were used in a dressing model constructed using a four layers of dressings: the primary layer consisted of either Jelonet or TelfaClear with or without Flamazine; the second was a layer of gauze, the third a layer of Gamgee and the final layer was Crepe bandage. The oil combinations were placed in either the gauze or the Gamgee layer. This four-layered dressing was placed over the seeded agar plate, incubated for 24h at 37 degrees C and the zones of inhibition measured. All experiments were repeated on three separate occasions. No anti-bacterial effects were observed when Flamazine was smeared on the gauze in the dressing model. When Telfaclear was used as the primary layer in the dressing model compared to Jelonet, greater zones of inhibition were observed. A combination of Citricidal and geranium oil showed the greatest-anti-bacterial effects against MRSA, whilst a combination of geranium and tea tree oil was most active against the methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (Oxford strain). This study demonstrates the potential of essential oils and essential oil vapours as antibacterial agents and for use in the treatment of MRSA infection.


    http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/45/5/639.full
    Tea tree oil has recently emerged as an effective topical antimicrobial agent active against a wide range of organisms. Tea tree oil may have a clinical application in both the hospital and community, especially for clearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage or as a hand disinfectant to prevent cross-infection with Gram-positive and Gramnegative epidemic organisms. Our study, based on the time–kill approach, determined the kill rate of tea tree oil against several multidrug-resistant organisms, including MRSA, glycopeptide-resistant enterococci, aminoglycoside-resistant klebsiellae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and also against sensitive microorganisms. The study was performed with two chemically different tea tree oils. One was a standard oil and the other was Clone 88 extracted from a specially bred tree, which has been selected and bred for increased activity and decreased skin irritation. Our results confirm that the cloned oil had increased antimicrobial activity when compared with the standard oil. Most results indicated that the susceptibility pattern and Gram reaction of the organism did not influence the kill rate. A rapid killing time (less than 60 min) was achieved with both tea tree oils with most isolates, but MRSA was killed more slowly than other organisms.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1....1904/abstract
    Abstract

    Ninety-one essential oils, each distilled from a single plant source, and 64 blended essential oils obtained from a commercial source were screened using the disc diffusion assay for inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Of the 91 single essential oils, 78 exhibited zones of inhibition against MRSA, with lemongrass, lemon myrtle, mountain savory, cinnamon and melissa essential oils having the highest levels of inhibition. Of 64 blended essential oils, 52 exhibited inhibitory activity against MRSA, with R.C. (a combination of myrtle, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus australiana, Eucalyptus radiata, marjoram, pine, cypress, lavender, spruce, peppermint and Eucalyptus citriodora oils), Motivation (a combination of Roman chamomile, ylang ylang, spruce and lavender oils) and Longevity (a combination of frankincense, clove, orange and thyme oils) blended essential oils having the highest inhibitory activity. These results indicate that essential oils alone and in combination can inhibit MRSA in vitro. Application of these results may include the potential use of essential oils as an alternative therapy for various diseases sustained by S. aureus MRSA. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    None of which means it's safe. Chemical agents might kill MRSA but damage tissue. Phenol is utilized in clean room pharmaceutical operations producing sterile drugs for immunocompromised patients. Phenol kills most pathogens but is harmful to tissues. Many over-the-counter cleaning agents or Listerine (mouthwash) have phenol in it, but it's bad for the mucous membranes.

    Note that people with common mold allergies have started using apple cider vinegar with active culture as a benign cheap safe disinfectant.
    Last edited by RubiconDecision; November 13, 2015 at 08:07 PM.

  4. #4
    Roma_Victrix's Avatar Gatorade, is it in you?
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    12,620

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Quote Originally Posted by sumskilz View Post
    Various traditional medicine claims are worth subjecting to scientific scrutiny at least once, for all the magical thinking, occasionally people stumble upon things via trial and error even if they have no clue about the real mechanism. Even chimpanzees self-medicate.
    Excellent point. It's a shame I can't rep you right now!

    Quote Originally Posted by RubiconDecision View Post
    Several years ago(2004), in the UK they stumbled upon a mix 4 essential oils(orange, grapefruit, lemon plus another). They diluted this with water, put it in an atomizer, sprayed a surface, and killed MRSA consistently.

    Any bacteria will survive an agent, pass along immunity, and create a potentially dangerous pathogen. It's inevitable. Mixing various agents means a potential to reduce adaptability.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15555788

    http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/45/5/639.full

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1....1904/abstract

    None of which means it's safe. Chemical agents might kill MRSA but damage tissue. Phenol is utilized in clean room pharmaceutical operations producing sterile drugs for immunocompromised patients. Phenol kills most pathogens but is harmful to tissues. Many over-the-counter cleaning agents or Listerine (mouthwash) have phenol in it, but it's bad for the mucous membranes.

    Note that people with common mold allergies have started using apple cider vinegar with active culture as a benign cheap safe disinfectant.
    More excellent points! And to be honest I've never heard about that apple cider vinegar recipe before. I'll have to look into that.

  5. #5
    Iskar's Avatar Insanity with Dignity
    Citizen

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Frankfurt, München, somtimes my beloved Rhineland
    Posts
    4,928

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Interesting finds. I would say, however, that the way to go would not be simply applying the historical recipes, but examining the components and how they interact to understand how they are detrimental to the bacteria metabolism and then amplify the effect with the methods of modern scientific pharmacology.
    "Non i titoli illustrano gli uomini, ma gli uomini i titoli." - Niccolo Machiavelli, Discorsi

    I can heartily recommend the Italian Wars mod by Aneirin.

    On an eternal crusade for reason, logics, catholicism and chocolate. Mostly chocolate, though.

    Under the patronage of the impeccable Aikanár, alongside Neadal/Aneirin. Humble patron of Cyclops, Frunk and Abdülmecid I.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Quote Originally Posted by Roma_Victrix View Post
    1,000-year-old onion and garlic eye remedy kills MRSA

    ...

    So what do you guys think? Do you think we should continue to scoff at medieval scientific claims, particularly those regarding medicine, given how they were largely ignorant about the natural world and most of their remedies were obviously ineffective (like bloodletting, for instance)? Or should we take them far more seriously when they present such remedies and test them out just in case?

    Things is said MRSA super bug developed over the past decades in response to hospital sterile environments so technically our AngloSaxon forefathers were still wrong as they poured this stuff in someone's eye for entirely different reasons than a Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus "superbug"!


    Obviously studying these old methods for medical merits should be done and is being, the trouble is when apparently it is a one off mentioning in a single old manuscript. Interesting question there is why this knowledge did not stay on our forefathers radar, getting repeated everywhere in every following medicine book or even via oral tradition.
    "Sebaceans once had a god called Djancaz-Bru. Six worlds prayed to her. They built her temples, conquered planets. And yet one day she rose up and destroyed all six worlds. And when the last warrior was dying, he said, 'We gave you everything, why did you destroy us?' And she looked down upon him and she whispered, 'Because I can.' "
    Mangalore Design

  7. #7

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Medical researchers and medical staff were and are deeply concerned about prions. We really don't know much about them. Did you know some very common metal ions disrupt prions? We have to throw out preconceived ideas and be willing to actually TEST, VERIFY, RETEST, PUBLISH, blah blah blah and get over the idea that some herb or some idea is crackpot.

    The patients deserve scientists who look at all of the solutions.
    ...
    The worst possible situation occurs in the USA. Unscrupulous companies sell herbs and spurious products especially homeopathy items, that do NOTHING. There is scant evidence that oral consumption of an herb will cure anything, or even lessen a symptom. Many are not even standardized so one product or even one tablet or capsule could be radically different in potency. As such, it's nonsense.

    Then on top of this, patients are embarrassed to tell their physicians that they're self-medicating because what the physician prescribed is of low efficacy plus has terrible side effects (particularly sexual side effects). So the physician can't do a proper medical history, has to hem and haw around to demonstrate resonance with the patient, and then earn trust, before they admit, "Yeah, I heard ___ works, so I'm also taking that, but not regularly, but sometimes I take a lot, blah, blah, blah.

    Some herbs might have remarkable phytochemicals which could be utilized to significantly treat symptoms or ailments but without testing and responsibility with manufacturers and patients, then it's the blind leading the blind.

    Herbs have side effects. Herbs can interfere with common metabolic processes. Herbs can oppose the very pharmaceuticals the physician prescribes.

    But dopey physicians also don't track what other drugs the patient is taking (polypharmacy), a major issue in geriatrics, and counts upon a pharmacy system to catch drug interactions. Of course these are missed, and luckily we still have considerate pharmacists (chemists in the UK), who catch them. Or diligent RNs catching them during charting.

    We have a ton of sick patients who deserve better cheaper health care, and oral medications are the cheapest way to manage but no panacea.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    971
    New superbug in China threatens to defeat last-resort antibiotics By Helen Branswell
    November 18, 2015


    Experts have been warning for a while that the bell is tolling for the end of the antibiotic era, presaging a time when infections won’t be treatable with the drugs that have changed modern medicine. On Wednesday, that ominous knell got a little bit louder.
    Chinese and British scientists reported that they have found a strain of Escherichia coli that is resistant to colistin, the antibiotic of last resort for gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli. The resistant bacteria were found in pigs, raw pork meat, and in a small number of people in China.

    http://www.statnews.com/2015/11/18/s...hina-colistin/

    Anglo-Saxons once again save the world from the yellow menace.
    Eats, shoots, and leaves.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Anglo-Saxon garlic and onion eye recipe from the 9th century kills 90% of MRSA "superbug"

    Yellow Peril, get it right.

    It's the scary map of antibiotic resistance, and contagion that's the issue.
    http://www.cgdev.org/page/looking-drug-resistance
    http://www.antibioticresearch.org.uk...l-cancer-2050/

    At the end of all the pandemic waves without antibiotics, Africa, then Asia, Latin America, then then the EU, then America falls.

    Australia rules a world absent most humans.

    Unless the infected travel by plane to Australia first.
    ...
    Want to see how you'd be if in charge? Play Pandemic.
    http://www.crazymonkeygames.com/Pandemic-2.html
    Last edited by RubiconDecision; November 19, 2015 at 11:46 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •