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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #161
    alex33's Avatar Ordinarius
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Has anyone read: The Antigonid Army byNicholas Sekunda? http://www.amazon.co.uk/Antigonid-Ar...antigonid+army Any experience with this book? Does anyone know any good books about the antigonid army?

  2. #162

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by alex33 View Post
    Has anyone read: The Antigonid Army byNicholas Sekunda? http://www.amazon.co.uk/Antigonid-Ar...antigonid+army Any experience with this book? Does anyone know any good books about the antigonid army?
    haven't read it, but the author is one of the leading academicians in the field, so it is definitely worth a look.

    added to the OP, thank you.

  3. #163
    Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes's Avatar Primicerius
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I have two very good ones I am reading currently. Well I am reading dozens, but most do not probably interest fans of this era. As they are mostly Sixth and Seventh Century CE. However if you are I will gladly share.
    Roman Palmyra: Identiny, Community, and State Formation
    Identity, Community, and State Formation

    Andrew M. Smith II

    Joins the diplomatic and political history of the Roman and Parthian empires with the historical ethnography of Palmyra as a frontier community
    Examines the shaping and maintenance of Palmyrene identity in diaspora settings, in both Roman and Parthian territories
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    A fuller ano detailed description follows, I added because I felt it necessary to convey my recommendation for this title. As I do most books concerncerning cultural identity in Near East, particularly amongst the Greeks.
    That has fueled considerable debate among scholars concerning the nature of the interactions between Romans and natives in the Near East. Notions of imperialism, specifically "cultural" imperialism, frame much of the debate. Through a detailed analysis of Palmyrene identity and community formation, Andrew M. Smith II presents a social and political history of Roman Palmyra, the oasis city situated deep in the Syrian Desert midway between Damascus and the Euphrates river. This city-state is unique in the ancient world, since it began as a humble community, probably no more than an isolated village, and grew--due in part to its role in the caravan trade--into an economically powerful, cosmopolitan urban center of Graeco-Roman character that operated outside of Roman rule, yet under Roman patronage. The book therefore focuses on two aspects of Palmyrene civilization during the first three centuries of the Common Era: the emergence and subsequent development of Palmyra as a commercial and political center in the desert frontier between Rome and Parthia (and later Persia), and the "making" of Palmyrenes. This study is thus concerned with the creation, structure, and maintenance of Palmyrene identity and that of Palmyra as an urban community in a volatile frontier zone. The history of Palmyra's communal development would be wholly obscure were it not for the archaeological and epigraphic materials that testify to Palmyrene achievements and prosperity at home and abroad. These, complemented by the literary evidence, also provide insight into the relatively obscure historical process of sedentarization and of the relationships between pastoral and sedentary communities in the Roman Near East. In addition to examining Palmyra as a frontier community, the book will move beyond Syria to explore the development and maintenance of Palmyrene identity in diaspora settings in Italy, north Africa, and Europe. This study is thus concerned with the creation, structure, and maintenance of Palmyrene identity and that of Palmyra as an urban community in a volatile frontier zone




    Fejfer, Jane, Mette Moltesen & Annette Rathje (ed.)
    Tradition
    Transmission of Culture in the Ancient World

    Contributors: Niels Bargfeldt/Cecilie Brøns/Jane Fejfer/Solvejg Hansen/Signe Isager/Ifke van Kampen/Arja Karivieri/Jens Krasilnikoff/Eva Morten-sen/Christian Mühlenbock/Marjatta Nielsen/Nora Petersen/Rubina Raja/Sine Grove Saxkjær & Jan Kindberg Jacobsen/Stine Schierup/Lone Wriedt Sørensen/Christina Videbech/Kristina Winther-Jacobsen.

    Jane Fejfer is associate professor of classical archaeology at the University of Copenhagen.

    Mette Moltesen is former curator of Ancient Sculp-ture at Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen.

    Annette Rathje is associate professor emerita of classical archaeology at the University of Copenhagen and editor-in-chief of the monographic series Acta Hyperborea

    Tradition – from the Latin tradere, literally to hand over or hand down – has many meanings and as a concept has a long history in Western culture. When using archaeological remains to interpret the social relations of people of Antiquity, tradition becomes an important concept. We cannot explain change without knowing and being conscious of la longue durée of material culture. Thus, over a long-term perspective archaeologists seek to trace a record of continual change.


    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    This lavishly illustrated book takes readers from prehistoric Santorini to Late Antique Rome and discusses the role of tradition in the transmission of culture and the creation, maintenance and negotiation of identity in the ancient world. Covering a wide array of subjects, including cultic rituals and the use of magical objects and symbols, votive traditions in Greek sanctuaries, funerary portraits, and Iron Age pottery, Tradition reveals how culture inheres in each and how actions and objects alike play a role in the continuation and change of culture. With its thoroughly interdisciplinary approach, Tradition breaks new ground in the studies of the classical and ancient world.
    Last edited by Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes; September 09, 2015 at 02:50 AM.

  4. #164

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Has anyone mentioned The Fall of Carthage by A Goldsworthy?

    If so, apologies.

    Great read with lots of detail on military matters.
    "I should like to see...the last king strangled with the guts of the last priest"

  5. #165

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I've a request to all good people
    Could anyone share a link to good book, articles about Crete, please? I'm interested in pre-roman (starting from neolithic) and roman time frame.
    Last edited by Demon Soul; September 15, 2015 at 01:05 PM.

    "najłatwiej i najpiękniej nie gnębić drugich, ale samemu nad sobą pracować, żeby być możliwie jak najlepszym" Sokrates

  6. #166
    Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes's Avatar Primicerius
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I have several in my library that deal with Bronze Age Aegean, not specifically Krete, but as to be expected a significant proportion is devoted to Minoans and surrounding cultures, trade etc.
    I will let the titles and books do the talking. The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean (Oxford Handbooks in Archaeology)by Eric H. Cline (Editor)
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The Greek Bronze Age, roughly 3000 to 1000 BC, witnessed the flourishing of the Minoan and Mycenean civilizations, the earliest expansion of trade in the Aegean and wider Mediterranean Sea, the development of artistic techniques in a variety of media, and the evolution of early Greek religious practices and mythology. The period also witnessed a violent conflict in Asia Minor between warring peoples in the region, a conflict commonly believed to be the historical basis for Homer's Trojan War. The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean provides a detailed survey of these fascinating aspects of the period, and many others, in sixty-six newly commissioned articles.



    The Aegean Bronze Age (Cambridge World Archaeology)
    Hardcover – 3 Mar 1994
    by Oliver Dickinson (Author)

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Oliver Dickinson has written a scholarly, accessible, and up-to-date introduction to the prehistoric civilizations of Greece. The Aegean Bronze Age, the long period from roughly 3000 to 1000 BC, saw the rise and fall of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. The cultural history of the region emerges through a series of thematic chapters that treat settlement, economy, crafts, exchange and foreign contact (particularly with the civilizations of the Near East), and religion and burial customs. Students and teachers will welcome this book, but it will also provide the ideal companion for amateur archaeologists visiting the Aegean.



    Aegean Art and Architecture (Oxford History of Art)
    by Donald Preziosi
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    This book introduces the reader to the historical and social contexts within which the arts - pottery, gold, silver, and ivory objects, gravestone reliefs, frescoes, and architecture - of the Aegean area developed. It examines the functions they served, and the ways in which they can be read as evidence for the interactions of many different peoples and societies in the eastern Mediterranean. It also provides an up-to-date critical historiography of the field in its relationship to the growth of ancient art history, archaeology, and museology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, giving a contemporary audience a clear appreciation of what has been at stake in the uncovering and reconstruction of this ancient society.


    Political Economies of the Aegean Bronze Age by Daniel J. Pullen (Author, Editor)

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The amazing discovery of the 'first European civilization' in Crete, Greece and the Aegean islands during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was beyond what anyone had imagined. Beginning with the Neolithic period, before 3000 BCE, and ending at the close of the Bronze Age and the transition to the Iron Age of Hellenic Greece (c.1000 BCE), this is the first comprehensive introduction to the visual arts and architecture of this extraordinary era.

    This book introduces the reader to the historical and social contexts within which the arts - pottery, gold, silver, and ivory objects, gravestone reliefs, frescoes, and architecture - of the Aegean area developed. It examines the functions they served, and the ways in which they can be read as evidence for the interactions of many different peoples and societies in the eastern Mediterranean. It also provides an up-to-date critical historiography of the field in its relationship to the growth of ancient art history, archaeology, and museology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, giving a contemporary audience a clear appreciation of what has been at stake in the uncovering and reconstruction of this ancient society.
    Last edited by Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes; September 15, 2015 at 10:34 PM.

  7. #167

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Thank you Gaius.
    I think I'll choose two of them (the prices ).

    "najłatwiej i najpiękniej nie gnębić drugich, ale samemu nad sobą pracować, żeby być możliwie jak najlepszym" Sokrates

  8. #168
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    The last volume of Grainger´s history of Seleukid empire is coming out at 30.11.2015:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



  9. #169
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    This books looks very interesting and very promising

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



  10. #170

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    just ordered this, looks promising:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/030015204...051_TE_3p_dp_1

  11. #171
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    The last volume of Grainger´s history of Seleukid empire is coming out at 30.11.2015:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    I must get my hands on that book.
    "First get your facts straight, then distort them at your leisure." - Mark Twain

    οὐκ ἦν μὲν ἐγώ, νῦν δ' εἰμί· τότε δ' ούκ ἔσομαι, ούδέ μοι μελήσει

  12. #172

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    If you guys don't mind my asking, what was the reference for the veils/turbans on the Maures? I don't mean that in any passive aggressive way, I'm just curious for if I can justify it for my berbers in the Attila period.

  13. #173
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Apollodotos I Soter View Post
    I must get my hands on that book.
    Also the first and second volume of the trilogy are great books

    I just found new book (at least for me ) about Hellenistic Bactria called Lost World of the Golden King by Frank L. Holt.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



  14. #174
    leoni's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    may someone find this helpfull, as i am http://www.stoa.org/projects/demos/a...greekEncoding=

  15. #175
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Also the first and second volume of the trilogy are great books

    I just found new book (at least for me ) about Hellenistic Bactria called Lost World of the Golden King by Frank L. Holt.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Grainger's books are amongst the best when it comes to the hellenistic east. That other book about Bactria looks interesting too.
    "First get your facts straight, then distort them at your leisure." - Mark Twain

    οὐκ ἦν μὲν ἐγώ, νῦν δ' εἰμί· τότε δ' ούκ ἔσομαι, ούδέ μοι μελήσει

  16. #176

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Ahiga View Post
    If you guys don't mind my asking, what was the reference for the veils/turbans on the Maures? I don't mean that in any passive aggressive way, I'm just curious for if I can justify it for my berbers in the Attila period.
    Sorry for the late response, I didn't see this earlier. I'm not a historian, so I don't really browse this thread often.

    The historian(s) who concepted the North African units are no longer around. I took a look through the older threads in the internal forum, but I can't seem to find the relevant thread. The Maure units were concepted years ago. The newer versions redone by Tux a couple of months back were modifications of the existing unit. I can't find any information or discussion about the turban wrappings on the Maure units in that thread either.

    Sorry I can't be of any help.

  17. #177

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    The last volume of Grainger´s history of Seleukid empire is coming out at 30.11.2015:

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    just bought the first volume and this seems to be available on the amazon already.

    adding the sources in, thanks everyone

  18. #178
    leoni's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    what do you know about the ancient olympics....check it out here, with some cool animations...http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health...tent-section-4

  19. #179
    leoni's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    and amphipolis tomb animation...these could be used as event clips...http://greece.greekreporter.com/2014...king-3d-video/

  20. #180
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Interesting - in the Pen and Sword website you can only preorder the last volume. Well, I have the last volume as preordered - I just have to wait

    http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-F...rdback/p/11175

    Please, post the review of Hannibal: A Hellenistic Life when you can



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