Page 6 of 18 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 351

Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #101
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    1,624

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Yes I know, I have his book The Severans: The Roman Empire Transformed. But this book and I think The Antonines too are only the hybrid of his two books - History of Rome, The Roman Emperors: A Biographical Guide to the Rulers of Imperial Rome. It´s true that you find a little more information in books about Severans and Antonines, but most info you will find in the two books I mentioned (I found it very repetitive in The Severans, it´s a waste of my limited financial resource for books to buy The Antonines and there are several Pen and Sword books and two Osprey upcoming ). But his other books are great, like the Cleopatra´s biography and The Fall of Roman Empire.

    Still I like Michael Grant´s work.
    Last edited by tomySVK; February 15, 2015 at 04:22 AM.



  2. #102
    ahowl11's Avatar RTR Project
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,291

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I have a lot of his books in my wish list at amazon. Also, some really informative reads but also easy reads are the books that Isaac Asimov wrote on the Greeks and Romans.
    Founder and Leader of The RTR Project, Bringing Rome Total Realism back to the top! Talk to me about joining the RTR Project, and rebuilding a once great community!

    RTRPE II v1.1
    Rome Total History & Mundus Magnus Forums

  3. #103
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    1,624

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Imagination of a Monarchy - Studies in Ptolemaic Propaganda by R.A. Hazzard sounds very interesting and useful for Hellenistic studies.



  4. #104
    Semisalis
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    412

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I just read this book (which is already in the OP) The Macedonian War Machine 359 - 281 BC, David Karunanithy.

    My summary: this book focuses on neglected aspects of the Macedonian army such as recruitment, training, marching, logistics, seige equipment and crossing geographic obstacles (more explored areas such as the sarissa and the phalanx are left for other authors). This is a fascinating book, well researched and referenced, describing a highly professional and organised army and military state. The author also offers some interesting speculations where evidence is lacking. Particularly intriguing are the changes in the army and armour (linen to metallic) that may have taken after Alexander took over and had acces to all the riches and resources of the Archaemenid empire.

    Last edited by Col.KanKrusha; March 01, 2015 at 09:17 PM.
    ~ Too soon old, too late smart ~

  5. #105

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    added the comments to the OP, thanks for valuable feedback. and it was interesting to read some thoughts on the book for me personally (the book's been sitting on my amazon wish list for some time now). sounds like an interesting read and i hope to get to it later this year. cheers

  6. #106

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    So i finally read the Rise of the Seleucid Empire from Seleukus I. to Seleukos II.

    It's a very interesting read. It keeps your attention when reading it. So i would definetly recommend it. On the other side of things, i'm not happy with the lack of detailed maps (would be really helpfull as he gets into a lot of specific details about places), and it gets anticlimactic from time to time; the major battles of the diadochi get resolved really quickly.

    Still overall a very good read. I have learned a lot especially for the period between Alexander's death and the start of EB.

    Will definetly get the Antiochos III book when it comes out.

  7. #107

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Hey Sarkiss--great job with this! So I just read through "Shadows in the Desert" again, and I have to say that we should take it off the list. While its military stuff is really good, Farrokh writes a quasi-nationalistic narrative that has a lot of problems which basically translates into Iranians=awesome, everyone else=sucks. Yeah, I was astounded at how bad it got (he also casually dismisses Seleukid impact on the Iranian plateau) to the point it didn't even seem like an academic work, but rather a fanboy approach to Iranian history.

    On a lighter note, I wish to add two new books to the bibliography:

    http://www.amazon.com/Arsacids-Sasan...ssanians+rahim--An amazing book that goes into ideology of the Arsakids and how the Sassanians both co-opted and diverged from this model. Really amazing book, and even employs the Bablyonian Astronomical Dairies. Recommended for any budding historian of the Near East.

    Another one is: http://www.amazon.com/Decline-Fall-S...+the+Sassanian---Absolutely amazing book that goes into great detail about the Arsakid social structure and very intricate detail about the Sassanian revolution. She argues an up-and-coming idea that the Sassanians were likely a Parthian clan themselves, and that the Sassanian empire should really be called the Sassanian-Parthian empire. Really good stuff, and would highly recommend it.

    Finally, this is a book that we forgot to mention, but whose work has been instrumental in Parthian historiography. Without this work, literally all the stuff that we have on the Parthians (especially the early Parthians) would not exist. This guy (David Sellwood) was THE guy in Parthian numismatics and wrote this amazing book: http://www.amazon.com/introduction-C.../dp/0900696451

    His categorization of Parthian coins is so important that virtually all modern studies on the Parthians use his system. Unfortunately he was forgotten and died with little fanfare in 2012, but we cannot be more indebted to him when it comes to Parthian history. He will not be forgotten. (Rant over)

  8. #108
    Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes's Avatar Primicerius
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Σελεύκεια
    Posts
    3,263

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    That reminds me of a title I read some time ago Seleucid and Arsacid Studies: A Progress Report on Developments in Source Research Author: Jozef Wolski; Publisher: Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences. A very interesting study that has continued from his earlier works on the Seleukids and Arsasids using new research results based on the Graeco-Latin sources, primarily Strabo and Justin, and analysis of recently discovered Babylonian sources will prove to be a very interesting study for those involved in this field of research. I recommend it. It is in English
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seleucid-Ars...words=Arsacids

  9. #109

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Yup, the Astronomical dairies have been incredibly helpful giving huge amounts of political information as well how both powers interacted with the Babylonians. A newer idea that is beginning to get credence is the really close relationships between both powers, to the point that the Arsakids wish to portray themselves as successors to the Seleukids. So despite their hostility, the Parthians were very much influenced by the Seleukids.

  10. #110
    Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes's Avatar Primicerius
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Σελεύκεια
    Posts
    3,263

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tobymoby View Post
    Yup, the Astronomical dairies have been incredibly helpful giving huge amounts of political information as well how both powers interacted with the Babylonians. A newer idea that is beginning to get credence is the really close relationships between both powers, to the point that the Arsakids wish to portray themselves as successors to the Seleukids. So despite their hostility, the Parthians were very much influenced by the Seleukids.
    Indeed, one has only to look at Arsakid numismatics to see the definite Seleukid influences. Which brings me to another title I am sure will be of interest
    The Impact of Seleucid Decline on the Eastern Iranian Plateau: The Foundations of Arsacid Parthia and Graeco-Bactria (Historia: Einzelschriften)
    Author Jeffrey D. Lerner
    Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden GmbH (1999)

    NB It is very difficult to get hold of a copy, so if you have a good University/research library your in luck

  11. #111

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    thanks everyone, will update the OP later on today or tomorrow. cheers

  12. #112
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    1,624

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    added the comments to the OP, thanks for valuable feedback. and it was interesting to read some thoughts on the book for me personally (the book's been sitting on my amazon wish list for some time now). sounds like an interesting read and i hope to get to it later this year. cheers
    Go for it, it´s amazing book. Even if you read several books about Makedonian armies you will learn new things from this book. Also the second volume of Seleukid history called The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III by John D Grainger is out, my copy is on the way:

    http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-S...ardback/p/9791



  13. #113

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Go for it, it´s amazing book. Even if you read several books about Makedonian armies you will learn new things from this book. Also the second volume of Seleukid history called The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III by John D Grainger is out, my copy is on the way:

    http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-S...ardback/p/9791
    Wow awesome. On amazon it said mid-may! Gonna order it too .

    Read a book about pyrhus also. I'm gonna write a short review soon; reading the Study of Lysimachus as we speak as well

  14. #114
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    1,624

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Did you also read Antigonus the One-Eyed by Jeff Champion? Reviews are positive, I think later I will get this book also I´m looking forward to read Pyrrhus´ book review



  15. #115

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Did you also read Antigonus the One-Eyed by Jeff Champion? Reviews are positive, I think later I will get this book also I´m looking forward to read Pyrrhus´ book review
    I did not. But given that i noticed his is the book on Pyrrhus i read, it might be another one i want to get, so thanks for the tip

    Ok, so about Pyrrhus of Epirus by Jeff Champion.

    I have to admit first of all, my knowledge of Pyrrhus was scetchy. I know who he was and approximately what he did, but i really didn't delve in to the characther too much.

    I have to say what i read in the book surprised me. I always thought Pyrrhus was a man that could really create a big Hellenic empire. After reading the book i think he couldn't. For example, it is shown to us that he invaded Italy because he didn't dare to attack Ptolemy Keraunos in Macedonia, despite the latter not have consolidated power. It showed that while he battled with the Romans, he was in my mind clearly the underdog. If the Romans had experience in fighting the Macedonian phalanx and elephants, i'm certain Pyrhus would be obliterated in the first battle. It showed that while he managed to conquer Sicily, he really didn't understand what it was all about in how to proceed in handling the strong Poleis there. He lost support really fast, and i think this would happen to him elswhere as well.

    Still, he was a fascinating character, but the book really turned around my thinking of him as a mini Alexander, to just one of the weaker Hellenic kings in my mind in the era of the diadochi. He basically attacked italy because fight the diadochi seemed too difficult. He planned on attacking africa, but lacked the ability to even secure his home bases.

    For example, i read a lot on Seleucus before Pyrhus, and it's insane how different they approached their would be subjects; needless to say the Italian people's were changing sides as the wind blew, while Babylonia stayed loyal to the Seleucids till the Parthians invaded.

    Ok so i admit this was more about what the new things are instead of the book itself; so about the book :

    I really liked it. It is well written, and while it says that it's intended for a non-academic audience, he does go into quite a few detailes critically citing different historians; why he believes them, why not etc which i think is really great for this kind of work. Also, imho to really understand the book you really need to have a pretty decent knowledge or the period, and look at the map a lot to really understand what's going on, so don't worry about the book being too basic.

    I will definetly buy more books from the author.
    Last edited by Anubis88; March 30, 2015 at 01:01 PM.

  16. #116

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Hi,

    I wished to thank your for sharing.

    I wished to ask if you'll be willing to share Intel about the choices you made on gorytos of Parthians units, specifically early units, sahae ans parni related.

    I wish to do parni reenactment and am looking for anything about that.

    I know there are several "standard" models of gorytos, and that there are two particular "model"," eastern " and "western", but I am limited in the knowledge of where to draw " the line" between east and west in that matter. I feel dahae group is in the middle of everything concerning Scythian cultures.

    Thank you for reading me.


  17. #117
    Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes's Avatar Primicerius
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Σελεύκεια
    Posts
    3,263

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Not a book this time, but a colleague shared this on Twitter
    http://www.pergamon.secondpage.de/index_en.html
    3D 'reconstruction of Pergamon
    Last edited by Basileos Antiokhos Euergetes; April 01, 2015 at 02:42 PM.

  18. #118

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    great stuff, updated the OP, thanks.

  19. #119
    leoni's Avatar Campidoctor
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    1,517

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    this thread is great, and if you take a break from reading...just check this...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmZ6HegULhk

  20. #120

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by leoni View Post
    this thread is great, and if you take a break from reading...just check this...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmZ6HegULhk
    looks great, will be watching it tonight, thanks.
    updated the OP with both English and Spanish versions. cheers

Page 6 of 18 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •