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Thread: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

  1. #181

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Interesting - in the Pen and Sword website you can only preorder the last volume. Well, I have the last volume as preordered - I just have to wait

    http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-F...rdback/p/11175

    Please, post the review of Hannibal: A Hellenistic Life when you can
    will do as soon as I get around to reading it. the reviews were pretty good. btw, Yale also published a work on Xerxes that has a somewhat similar title: Xerxes: A Persian Life. looks very interesting, will be getting it too, one day.
    good price for Grainger's book on Pen and Sword but delivery is pricie.

  2. #182

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sylon View Post
    Sorry for the late response, I didn't see this earlier. I'm not a historian, so I don't really browse this thread often.

    The historian(s) who concepted the North African units are no longer around. I took a look through the older threads in the internal forum, but I can't seem to find the relevant thread. The Maure units were concepted years ago. The newer versions redone by Tux a couple of months back were modifications of the existing unit. I can't find any information or discussion about the turban wrappings on the Maure units in that thread either.

    Sorry I can't be of any help.

    No worries, I appreciate the effort! The new ones look great, all things said.

  3. #183
    tomySVK's Avatar Campidoctor
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Also there is a new book about ancient Iberia coming out soon. It´s called Weapons, Warriors and Battles of Ancient Iberia by Fernando Quesada Sanz.

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 



  4. #184

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    An interesting title soon to be published: An Invincible Beast: Understanding the Hellenistic Pike Phalanx in Action. anyone knows the author?
    here is another one for those who are into the Punic wars: Force Projection in the Punic Wars: Contrasting Approaches

  5. #185
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    An interesting title soon to be published: An Invincible Beast: Understanding the Hellenistic Pike Phalanx in Action. anyone knows the author?
    here is another one for those who are into the Punic wars: Force Projection in the Punic Wars: Contrasting Approaches
    The first book is in OP Also I have pre-ordered the book long time ago, it looks as must need for Hellenistic fans. The author wrote book A Storm of Spears and the book has positive reviews.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Storm-Spears...750155&sr=1-15

    I didn´t know the second book. Looks very interesting. Thanks for posting



  6. #186

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    lol, how did it end up in the OP when the book isnt even out yet? a mystery:-) storm of spears was author's PhD thesis, iirc. im curious what his prose is like, how readable. i ordered the second book, like its angle and focus.

  7. #187
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    lol, how did it end up in the OP when the book isnt even out yet? a mystery:-) storm of spears was author's PhD thesis, iirc. im curious what his prose is like, how readable. i ordered the second book, like its angle and focus.
    I posted the book as the future release some time ago So you ordered also Storm of spears? It looks like good book



  8. #188

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    I posted the book as the future release some time ago So you ordered also Storm of spears? It looks like good book
    ha-ha, mystery solved!
    i ordered the one on Punic Wars by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. wanted to read a narrow-focused purely military perspective on the conflict (its only 80 pages or so).

  9. #189

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Not sure if these books were mentioned yet (some probably were), but here are some suggestions of mine (all about Baktria/Indo-Greeks):

    Frank L. Holt has written some excellent books. "Into the Land of Bones" covers Alexander's campaign, while "Lost World of the Golden King" covers the baktrian and indo-greek kingdoms. The latter has lots of (in my view, mildly interesting) stuff about coins, coin recovery and the "history" of baktrian archaelogy/history science. BUT it is probably the most concise knowledge base about Baktria and the indo-greeks. It is also, by far, the most modern book about this topic.

    H.G. Rowlinson, Bactria - The History of a Forgotten Empire. Pretty interesting book. I think along with Tarn's standard book one of the best sources about ancient Baktria. Less opionated than Tarn, I think, but Rowlinson's book also has some outdated stuff in it.

    Finally a novel that really surprised me positively: Steven Pressfield, The Afghan Campaign. (http://www.stevenpressfield.com/the-afghan-campaign/)
    Probably the best novel about the diadochi time period that I ever held in my hands. Really gritty, tough, "realistic", but a fantastic read.

  10. #190
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeion View Post
    Frank L. Holt has written some excellent books. "Into the Land of Bones" covers Alexander's campaign, while "Lost World of the Golden King" covers the baktrian and indo-greek kingdoms. The latter has lots of (in my view, mildly interesting) stuff about coins, coin recovery and the "history" of baktrian archaelogy/history science. BUT it is probably the most concise knowledge base about Baktria and the indo-greeks. It is also, by far, the most modern book about this topic.
    Lost World of the Golden Kingt is in OP, but I don´t have read it yet. Thanks for your review

    There is also a Czech book about Bactrian Kings and Indo-Greek kings and their coins called Encyklopedie řecko-baktrijských a indo-řeckých panovníku z pohledu jejich mincí by Michal Mašek, book has 400 pages. It´s pretty good. Maybe some czech speaking fans/readers will find this information useful.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sarkiss View Post
    ha-ha, mystery solved!
    i ordered the one on Punic Wars by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. wanted to read a narrow-focused purely military perspective on the conflict (its only 80 pages or so).
    There is also publication called Operational issues of insurgency/counter insurgency: the Maccabean revolt by Ernest A. Szabo by them.

    http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/s...id/1000/rec/25
    Last edited by tomySVK; November 21, 2015 at 06:55 AM.



  11. #191

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    I think Holt mentions the book by Masek in his "Lost World of the Golden King" book. What I like about the Golden King is that he introduces a lot of different theories and information, puts it into context etc. Very thorough and scientific approach. He does not claim to know what exactly happened, but he shows what is likely, what is maybe a bit less likely but still possible and so on.

    And like I said it's also great that it is very much up to date, while when you read Tarn, for example, you can never be sure what findings are already proven to be wrong by modern archaeology.

  12. #192

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    A Critical History of Early Rome: From Prehistory to the First Punic War, Gary Forsythe(2006)

    Read this a few months ago and loved it. When I first started reading Roman history most books I read were mostly about the post Punic war era when Rome was already a great power so this book was perfect for me in bridging the cap from the foundation of Rome to the First Punic war.

    "As indicated by the title, the overall approach adopted throughout this volume is rather critical toward the general reliability of the surviving ancient sources of early Roman history. Agreeing with M. I. Finley's famous dictum that "the ancients' ability to invent and their capacity to believe are persistently underestimated," the author regards a critical approach as entirely justified and necessary."

  13. #193

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Although it's not covering the EB timeframe, I would advise everyone who has the slightest interest in greek history to read the following book from Christian Meier: http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00ZOGREEA?keywords=christian%20meier%20athen&qid=1448350260&ref_=sr_1_1&s=books-intl-de&sr=1-1



  14. #194

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Updated the OP (we are running out of space there!), thanks fellas.

  15. #195
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    a internet history sourcebook...may some like it...http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook08.asp

  16. #196
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Do you read Seleucid Dissolution: The Sinking of the Anchor guys? Is it good?

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 





  17. #197
    Ἀπολλόδοτος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ's Avatar Yeah science!
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    Quote Originally Posted by tomySVK View Post
    Do you read Seleucid Dissolution: The Sinking of the Anchor guys? Is it good?

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Nope, looks interesting, wouldn't mind having a look at it.
    "First get your facts straight, then distort them at your leisure." - Mark Twain

    οὐκ ἦν μὲν ἐγώ, νῦν δ' εἰμί· τότε δ' ούκ ἔσομαι, ούδέ μοι μελήσει

  18. #198

    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    In the fiction section, I recommend the Tyrant series by Christian Cameron. On the author's website he has a "prequel" short story about the main character of the first two books, Kineas of Athens. They're about his first battle, against Alexander at Chaeronea, Part 1 and Part 2.
    It began on seven hills - a historical house-ruled Romani AAR
    Heirs to Lysimachos - a semi-historical Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR
    Philetairos' Gift - a second attempt at an Epeiros-as-Pergamon AAR


  19. #199
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    A recommendation for the fiction section that might be a bit off, but it's really excellent, possibly the best historical fictional autobiography ever written, and it's about a Roman emperor. I know that the time is a bit off, a couple of decades after the end-year of the game, but it's worth a read.

    Memoirs of Hadrian (French: Mémoires d'Hadrien) by Marguerite Yourcenar

    The novel is basically an autobiographical memoir of the Emperor Hadrian, in which the aging emperor retells his life to his successor Marcus Aurelius. It's masterfully written and extremely well-informed, with a glimpse into the mind of the most powerful man in the Ancient world during his life, his life achievements, loves, failures, outlooks, and philosophy. Yourcenar won instant acclaim in the 1950s when it was published (after a decade of writing), and the book is still considered the golden standard for writing historical (biographical) fiction. It's basically what Flaubert's Salammbô was supposed to be. She was also the first woman to be admitted into the Académie française. All in all, I loved the book as a glimpse into Antiquity other works of scholarship and fiction can rarely achieve - I also quite fondly remember her essay about the writing process and trying to situate her story in the long-gone days.

  20. #200
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    Default Re: Europa Barbarorum Bibliography

    There is a new book about Republican Roman army coming out next year by Michael M. Sage called The Army of the Roman Republic: From the Regal Period to the Army of Julius Caesar (Pen and Sword publisher).

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 




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