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Thread: Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

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    Default Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

    Hannover (Hanover) 1789-1815

    To produce the following lists covering 1789 to 1815 I have drawn on L von Sichart “Geschichte der Königlich-hannoverschen armee (unable to cross-check later information as no access to volume 5 covering 1803 onwards), Otto von Pivka "Armies of the Napoleonic Era", Philip Haythornthwaite "The Napoleonic Source Book", Peter Hofschröer “The Hanoverian Army of the Napoleonic Wars” from the Osprey Men-at-Arms series, George Nafziger "Napoleon's German Enemies - Armies of Hanover, Brunswick, Hesse-Cassel & Hanseatic Cities (1792-1815)”, Richard Partridge & Michael Oliver "Napoleonic Army Handbook - The British Army & Her Allies", Knotel "Uniforms of the World", W J Rawkins “The Hanoverian Army 1814-15: Infantry”, N Ludlow Beamish “History of the King’s German Legion”, Mike Chappell “The King’s German Legion (1) 1803-1812” & “The King’s German Legion (2) 1812-1816” from the Osprey Men-at-Arms series, various magazines, articles & websites including http://www.kgl.de/ & http://www.kgl-linie.de/index.html.

    Hanover’s military was firmly linked to Great Britain from 1714 when the Elector of Hanover became King George I of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. From 1 February 1814 the Hanoverians were no longer considered part of the British Army.

    During the Napoleonic Wars Prussia briefly occupied Hanover in 1801. France invaded Hanover in spring 1803 becoming the ruling state and dissolving the army in July. Under great pressure from Napoleon Prussia accepted Hanover in exchange for territories for Murat & Bavaria. Britain declared war on Prussia’s occupation in March 1806 – though it wasn’t prosecuted with any vigour. Following Prussia’s catastrophic defeat in 1806-07 much of Hanover was incorporated into the Kingdom of Westphalia; in 1810 the northern territory became part of Metropolitan France. Many Hanoverian soldiers fled to Britain and joined the King’s German Legion, fighting with distinction in the Peninsular War.

    Following the French defeat in Russia, and the liberation of Northern Germany in 1813 a number of Hanoverian units were raised to serve with the Allied Armies. They fought as part of Wallmoden’s Corps in Bernadotte’s Army of the North

    Note: While nearly all sources consulted give just regimental numbers for the early Army, Nafziger does include regimental titles – I have included the latter as well in case any wants to “personalise” further their troops. Titles in brackets are those in Sichart.

    1789

    Infantry
    Garde-Regiment

    1st Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Stockhausen
    1794 von Scheither
    2nd Infanterie-Regiment (Prinz Friedrich)
    1789 von Reding (Nafziger has Prinz Friederich)
    1792 von Isendorff
    1794 von Dincklage
    3rd Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Redden
    1792 von Scheither
    1794 von Steding
    4th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Mutio
    1793 Bothmer
    5th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von der Beck
    1797 von Hugo
    1800 von Geyso
    1802 von Hassell
    6th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Bessel
    1792 von Hammerstein
    7th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von dem Bussche
    1794 du Plat
    8th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 Prinz Ernst von Mecklenburg-Strelitz
    1802 Prinz von Schwarzburg-Sonderhausen
    9th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Wurmb (Nafziger has von Quernheim)
    1793 von Wagenheim
    1794 von Duering
    1796 von Hugo
    1798 disbanded
    10th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 de Polier
    1791 von Diepenbroick
    1801 von der Wense
    1802 became 9th Infanterie-Regiment
    11th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Taube
    1795 von Diepenbroick
    1802 became 10th Infanterie-Regiment
    12th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Linsingen
    1795 von Walthausen
    1798 disbanded
    13th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Ahlefeld
    1792 von Bessel
    1795 von Scheither
    1802 became 11th Infanterie-Regiment
    14th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 von Wagenheim
    1791 disbanded
    15th Infanterie-Regiment
    1789 untitled
    1791 disbanded
    14th Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment formed 1791
    1793 Thies
    1794 von Diepenbroick
    1802 became 12th Infanterie-Regiment


    1789 - Each regiment comprised 2 battalions - each of 1 grenadier & 5 musketeer companies. Regimental HQ had 11 men; the 12 companies combined had 144 officers, NCOs & musicians, 152 grenadiers and 480 musketeers.

    1791 – Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment formed with 11 men HQ, 2 battalions each of 4 companies of 176 men. Attached to the Regiment were 2 Jäger companies, of 101 men.

    1792 - On active service Combined Grenadier battalions had a staff of 7 men, and 4 companies each of 158 men; Musketeer battalions had a staff of 9 men, and 4 companies each of 156 men. Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment companies had 100 men, and the regimental HQ had 13 men.

    1793 - Expeditionary force sent to Holland – 6 Infantry Regiments of 2 battalions of 4 musketeer companies; regimental HQ of 23 men, musketeer companies of 156 men. Three Combined Grenadier battalions of 4 companies each of 176 men, plus battalion HQ of 4 men.

    1794 –2nd, 3rd, 7th, 8th, 12th & 13th Regiments reinforced from the disbanded Land-Regimenter. These Regiments now comprised 2 battalions, each of 1 grenadier and 4 musketeer companies; plus a regimental depot company. They had a regimental HQ of 15 men; all companies were 100 men strong.

    1796 – Combined Grenadier battalions comprised battalion HQ of 7 men, 4 companies each of 158 men. One Grenadier battalion had 6 companies each of 104 men and battalion HQ of 7 men. Musketeer battalions comprised headquarters of 9 men, and 4 companies each of 156 men.

    1798 – Garde-Regiment had regimental HQ of 23 men, where as Line regiments had HQ of 22 men. All regiments (except the Leichtes) comprised 2 battalions of 1 grenadier and 5 musketeer companies. A grenadier company had 108 men, while a musketeer company had 106 men. Leichtes Infanterie Regiment did not have grenadier companies.

    1800 - Each battalion formed Scharfschützen unit of 65 men.

    1801 – End of June Leichtes Infanterie Regiment’s Jäger companies disbanded.

    1802 - Infantry battalions comprised 4 companies (1 grenadier & 3 musketeer).
    Garde-Regiment HQ 23 men, Grenadier companies 108 men & Musketeer companies 106 men. Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment had 8 companies of 106 men.

    Note: Grenadier companies were often stripped out of parent regiments to form combined Grenadier battalions: e.g. in 1793 three Grenadier battalions were mobilised for service in Holland.

    Garrison Regiments
    Lüneburg Garnison Regiment
    Ratzeburg Garnison Regiment
    1st Hameln Garnison Regiment
    2nd Hameln Garnison Regiment

    1789 – A garrison regiment was in effect a battalion and comprised 550 men.

    1798 – Two new garrison regiments raised; each had a Regimental HQ of 11 men and 2 battalions of 4 companies each of 118 men.

    1800 – New garrison regimentsdisbanded.

    Militia
    Hanover Land-Regiment
    Celle Land-Regiment
    Calenberg Land-Regiment
    Lüneburg Land-Regiment
    Grubenhagen Land-Regiment
    Wend Land-Regiment
    Hamel Land-Regiment
    Hoya Land-Regiment
    Göttingen Land-Regiment
    Diepholz Land-Regiment

    1789 – Each Regiment comprised a battalion of 5 companies, each of 110 men.

    1794 - Landregimenter disbanded and their personnel incorporated into the line.

    Cavalry

    Leib-Garde Regiment

    1st Cavallerie Regiment – also known as Leib Regiment
    1789 von Jonquières
    2nd Cavallerie Regiment
    1789 von Hammerstein
    1793 Prinz August, Herzog von Cumberland
    1798 von Bülow
    3rd Cavallerie Regiment
    1789 von Bremer
    1793 von Hammerstein
    1795 von Maydell
    1802 von Pflüg
    4th Cavallerie Regiment
    1789 von dem Bussche
    1795 von Wangenheim
    1799 von Schulte
    5th Cavallerie Regiment, Dragoner
    1789 von Ramdohr
    1797 Bremer
    6th Cavallerie Regiment, Dragoner
    1789 von Dachenhausen (Nafziger has 1789 Schmiedchen; 1793 von Dachenhausen)
    1803 van Hattorf
    7th Cavallerie Regiment, Dragoner
    1789 Graf von Oeynhausen (Nafziger has Friederichs; and then 1793 Graf von Oeynhausen)
    8th Cavallerie Regiment, Dragoner
    1789 von Estorff
    1795 Niemeyer
    9th Cavallerie Regiment, Leichte Dragoner
    1789 von Freytag (Nafziger has von Mannschaften)
    1795 became 9th Cavallerie Regiment, Königin Leichte Dragoner
    1798 von Hattorf
    1803 von Linsingen
    10th Cavallerie Regiment, Leichte Dragoner
    1789 von Minnigerode
    1794 von Linsingen
    1795 became 10th Cavallerie Regiment, Prinz Wallie Leichte Dragoner

    Note: 1st to 4th Cavalerie Regimenter were classed as Reuter (Heavy Cavalry).

    1789 - All regiments comprised 4 squadrons totalling 373 men. Garde & Reuter Regiments had a regimental staff of 9 men; whereas Dragoner & Leichte-Dragoner regiments had a regimental staff of 12 men.

    1793 - Expeditionary force sent to Holland – 4 combined cavalry regiments, each with HQ of 22 men (Light dragoons had 21 men); 4 squadrons each of 150 men. Regiments were combined as follows: Leibgarde & 2 Cavallerie Regiment; Leibregiment & 4 Cavallerie Regiment; 5 & 7 Cavallerie Regiments; and 9 & 10 Cavallerie Regiments, Leichte Dragoner. In addition all the individual constituent regiments maintained a depot of 100 men.

    1795 - All regiments reduced to 2 squadrons of 140 personnel each; Reuter with 13 Regimental staff and Dragoner with 20 regimental staff.

    1798 – Garde had a regimental staff of 16 men, whereas Reuter, Dragoner & Leichte-Dragoner Regiments had a regimental staff of 14 men. All regiments had 2 squadrons each of 182 men.

    1802 – All regiments had Regimental staff of 16 men; & 2 squadrons each of 182 men.

    Artillery

    1789 – The artillery was organised into a regiment of 2 battalions each of 5 companies.
    Two companies were horse artillery batteries, known as “geschwinder artillerie”. Each horse battery had 2 x7pdr howitzers & 4 x 3pdr cannon; serviced by 78 men.
    The remaining 8 companies were used to form 4 heavy batteries. Each heavy battery had 3 x 7pdr howitzers & 6 x6pdr cannon; serviced by 72 men.

    1802 – reorganised into 2 horse batteries (each of 2 x 7pdr howitzers & 6 x 6pdr cannon; each battery serviced by 140 men), 3 Line artillery batteries (2 x 7pdr howitzers & 6 x 6pdr cannon; each line battery serviced by 88 men), 1 heavy battery (6 x12pdr cannon), and 2 fortress batteries.

    1803 – Königlich Teutschen Legion (King’s German Legion)

    In August 1803 Baron Decken was commissioned to raise a corps of light infantry with the title “The King’s Germans”, shortly afterwards titled ‘King’s German Regiment’. At the same time major Colin Halkett was empowered to raise an infantry battalion. ‘All foreigners, but preferably gallant Germans, are hereby invited to take service in this corps....’. Copies of this proclamation were circulated in Hanover, resulting in many former Hanoverian soldiers taking passage to Britain to enlist. In December the numbers resulted in the proposal for a force of all arms be raised and to be known as “The King’s German Legion”.

    By January 1805 the Legion comprised:
    1 Heavy Dragoon Regiment
    1 Light Dragoon Regiment
    4 Line Battalions
    2 Light Battalions
    2 horse artillery batteries
    3 foot batteries

    By February 1806 the Legion comprised:

    2 Heavy Dragoon Regiments -converted to Light Dragoons at the end of 1812.
    3 Light Dragoon Regiments - called Hussars from late 1808 though not officially converted until end of 1812.
    8 Line Battalions
    2 Light Battalions
    2 horse artillery batteries
    4 foot batteries

    In 1813 a Foreign Veteran Battalion was formed for worn out soldiers of the KGL.

    Each of the battalions had 10 companies each of 111 men; and a sharpshooter detachment of 58 men armed with rifles. Battalion HQ was 13 men.
    Cavalry regiments had a HQ of 17 men, and 4 squadrons each of 178 men.
    Batteries had 225 personnel.

    In 1815, battalions had 6 companies each of 112 men, HQ of 14 men – light companies were rifle armed as were the light battalions. Cavalry Regiments had HQ of 15 men and 4 squadrons each of 176 men. Horse batteries had 230 men & foot batteries 231 men.


    1813

    Following the disastrous defeat of the French in Russia, and the liberation of Northern Germany in 1813 a number of Hanoverian units were raised to serve with the Allied Armies. Each battalion comprised 4 companies of 120 men, and each Hussar Regiment of 3 squadrons (later increased to 4) of 150 men.

    Leichtes-Bataillon Lüneburg
    Leichtes-Bataillon Bremen-Verden
    Feld-Bataillon Lauenburg
    Feldjägerkorps – initially 2 then 4 companies (disbanded September 1814).
    Husaren Regiment Bremen-Verden
    Husaren Regiment Lüneburg (later Prinz Regent Husaren Regiment)

    In May/June 1813 the army was joined by:

    Feld-Bataillon Bennigsen
    Feld-Bataillon Röhl (later called Langrehr)

    By August 1813

    1 foot artillery battery

    By the end of 1813

    Husaren Regiment Herzog von Cumberland (Duke of Cumberland’s)
    2 artillery batteries (1 horse & 1 field or both field – sources contradict)

    At the beginning of 1814 the following units joined the army:

    Leichtes-Bataillon Grubenhagen
    Leichtes-Bataillon Osnabruck
    Feld-Bataillon Calenburg

    In January 1814 thirty Militia battalions (Landwehrbataillon) – each of 4 companies of 160 men, there were no elite companies - were raised:

    Landwehrbataillon Alfeld (later Einbeck)
    Bentheim
    Bremerlehe (later Osterholz)
    Bremervörde
    Celle
    Gifhorn
    Goslar (later Salzgitter)
    Hameln
    Hannover
    Harburg
    Hildesheim
    Hoya
    Iburg (later Melle)
    Lüchow
    Lüneburg
    Meppen
    Münden
    Nienburg
    Northeim
    Osnabrück
    Osterode
    Ottendorf
    Peine
    Quakenbrück
    Stade
    Uelzen
    Verden
    Diepholz
    Ratzeburg
    Springe

    1815

    Infantry
    On 4 February 1815 all Feld & Landwehr-Battalionen were combined into regiments. Although 1 Feld-Battalion & 3 Landwehrbattalionen formed a regiment, they continued to operate separately.

    Nr 1 Bremen Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Bremen (formerly Leichtes-Bataillon Bremen-Verden)
    Landwehrbattalion Ottendorf
    Landwehrbattalion Stade
    Landwehrbattalion Bremervörde
    Nr 2 Verden Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Verden (formerly Feld-Bataillon Bennigsen)
    Landwehrbattalion Verden
    Landwehrbattalion Bremerlehe
    Landwehrbattalion Harburg
    Nr 3 Hoya Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Hoya (formerlyFeld-BataillonLangrehr)
    Landwehrbattalion Hoya
    Landwehrbattalion Nienburg
    Landwehrbattalion Diepholz
    Nr 4 Osnabrück Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Osnabrück (also known as Feld-Battaillon Herzog von York)
    Landwehrbattalion Osnabrück
    Landwehrbattalion Quackenbrück
    Landwehrbattalion Melle (formerly Landwehrbattalion Iburg)
    Nr 5 Lüneburg Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Lüneburg
    Landwehrbattalion Lüneburg
    Landwehrbattalion Celle
    Landwehrbattalion Gifhorn
    Nr 6 Lauenburg Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Lauenburg
    Landwehrbattalion Ratzeburg
    Landwehrbattalion Bentheim
    Landwehrbattalion Lüchow
    Nr 7 Calenburg Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Calenburg
    Landwehrbattalion Hannover
    Landwehrbattalion Hamlen
    Landwehrbattalion Neustadt
    Nr 8 Hildesheim Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Hildesheim
    Landwehrbattalion Hildesheim
    Landwehrbattalion Uelzen
    Landwehrbattalion Peine
    Nr 9 Grubenhagen Regiment
    Feld-Bataillon Grubenhagen
    Landwehrbattalion Alfeld
    Landwehrbattalion Salzgitter (formerly Landwehrbattalion Goslar)
    Landwehrbattalion Springe
    Nr 10 Göttingen Regiment
    Feldjägerkorps (formed in 1815)
    Landwehrbattalion Osterode
    Landwehrbattalion Münden
    Landwehrbattalion Northeim

    Cavalry

    Each regiment comprised 4 squadrons of 150 men.
    Husaren Regiment Bremen-Verden
    Husaren Regiment Lüneburg (later Prinz Regent Husaren Regiment)
    Husaren Regiment Herzog von Cumberland
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; September 29, 2011 at 07:41 AM. Reason: formatting
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

    Thank you
    It was very helpful, there is not much info on the Hanoverians of 1813 that we are using in NTW3

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

    Does anyone have any information or pictures on the uniform of the Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment in 1791-1799?

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    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
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    Default Re: Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

    Quote Originally Posted by MadManYo View Post
    Does anyone have any information or pictures on the uniform of the Leichtes Infanterie-Regiment in 1791-1799?
    Try: https://books.google.co.uk/books/abo...IC&redir_esc=y

    Also see attached.

    Haythornthwaite "Uniforms of the French Revolutionary Wars" says: Jaeger companies had green jackets & waistcoats, yellowish leather breeches, grey gaiters and yellow lace and epaulettes (officer had gold); whereas Knotel "Uniforms of the World" says the Jaeger had all green uniforms......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hanover.jpg  
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; July 21, 2015 at 03:40 PM. Reason: Comments on the Jaeger
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Hanoverian Regimental names 1789-1815

    Thanks Prince this is very helpful

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