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Thread: Epeirote "Preview"

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    Default Epeirote "Preview"

    Note: This was originally compiled by Legio XX Valeria Victrix months ago (August? ), so some of the statements are a little dated (and our screenshot of the Phyletai Illyrikoi has a slightly different tunic). Good luck whereever you are Legio!

    Hopefully you'll enjoy something new that was added to the mix thanks to VandalCarthage, and at least one new addition (for the next patch) in a screenshot below also.
    --------------------------
    Greetings Europa Barbarorum fans!

    This week's preview consists of one of our previously hidden, or Occultus, factions: Epeiros!

    For this week’s preview, a lot of thanks must go around. For units, most praise should be directed towards Spartan Warrior and Panda Centurion as well. I can't say enough to praise SW, who as everyone knows already, keeps amazing us week after week, and is an absolute machine. Our faction icon is the work of Dux Corvanus. Work on unit descriptions was mostly handled by Urnamma, with the help of others. Recent active historical advisors for this faction include QwertyMIDX and Teleklos Archelaou. Faction description and banner also by Teleklos Archelaou. So many other people have contributed heavily to this faction’s development. Thanks also go out to our scripting team and to Malrubius who has done a lot with our Hellenic traits. Many others have contributed along the way, but the list grows so long, that we might never get to the preview itself if we keep going!

    So, without further ado, this week, the EB team is proud to present:





    EPEIROS
    Epeiros, "the Mainland", the home of "wintry Dodone", the famed Molossian hounds, and of course, Pyrrhos. The regional tribes were formed into a strong state in the fourth century, led by their Molossian king. Conquests in Italy and an alliance with Rome were of little help when their great king Alexandros was killed in 330. Now another king has unified Epeiros and had great successes pacifying the Illyrians, and in battle in Italy and Sicily. Pyrrhos held much of Southern Italy and then took control of the island of Sicily except for two strongholds at the north and west. But he abandoned his hopes of conquering the island, his mother's homeland, and after a defeat at the hands of a Roman consular army he has taken his main force back to Hellas and pushed the Macedonians all the way to the coasts of the Aegean.

    Pyrrhos' military forces are modeled on the Successor armies of Makedon. Heavy phalanx infantry are the core with a strong reliance upon mercenary troops which include Gallic warbands, Kretan archers, Italiote hoplites, Tarentine cavalry, and many others. Heavy Successor cavalry units as well light javelin cavalry are available, and of course, heavily armored Indian elephants, one of the most recognizable features of the army of Pyrrhos, are at your disposal, as are mechanai of Hellenic siege craft.

    While your army is strong, and your position is sound, one misstep could bring your empire crashing to the ground. The kingdom of Epeiros is at a crossroads. Do you double your efforts and attempt to push the Makedonians into the Aegean from their coastal possessions at Pella and Demetrias? You are already at war and have claimed the title of "King of Makedonia" and need only drive them from the north. Their possessions in southern Hellas are more problematic though. The memory of Sicily is but a fleeting dream, and it will take much effort if you are to resume your great plan to seize the entire island. Your control in southern Italy even is in danger of succumbing to the further aggression of Rome, with whom you are at war, unless you act strategically to solidify your position or give up your last stronghold there. The Illyrian tribes to your north are strong and wild, but more effort in bringing them under your control could do much to strengthen your kingdom for further campaigns elsewhere and their help has brought great benefits to you in the past. Finally you have just been invited by a deposed king of Sparta to help him take control of the Peloponnese, though you are not openly hostile towards them. Seizing Thermon to the south and the wealth and prestige the Oracle of Apollo at Delphi grants should be an early goal, but do you dare to lead your army past the Makedonians in Korinthos and take on Makedon and the Spartans there as well? The choice is yours. But a word to the wise: "Stay away from Argos!"

    A Brief History of Epeiros

    The region of Greece known as Epirus was first settled by Greek colonists in the 6th Century BC. They set up a dynasty known as the Molossians. The Molossians believed that they were descended from Neoptolemos, the son of the famed classical hero Achilles. Neoptolemos was a savage and ruthless warrior who had fought at Troy after the death of his father. According to the Molossian legend, following the war he and his followers emigrated to the shores of Epirus.

    Epirus was important to Greek religion and practice, because it was the home of the sacred shrine at Dodona. Here there was an ancient and massive oak tree that was alleged to contain Zeus’ spirit which would communicate to the oracles through the rustling of the leaves. The oracle at Dodona was the second most important in Greek mythology, behind only the oracle at Delphi.

    A second Neoptolemos entered Epirote history sometime in the 4th Century BC, and unlike the Neoptolemos of the 12th Century BC, this one was real and not a product of legend. Neoptolemos bore two children of great renown in the ancient world. His daughter, Olympias, was married off to Philip II of Macedon, and was the mother of the ruler of the known world: Alexandros. His son was another Alexander, known as Alexander Molossus, who was outshone by his cousin in Macedon of the same name. Nevertheless, when Alexander Molossus attained the throne in 343 BC, he had plans for expansion.

    In 333 BC, the city of Taras (Tarentum) in southern Italy, a traditional Greek bastion in that region of the Mediterranean, asked for assistance in a war against the Samnites, Lucanians, and Bruttians. In the same year that Alexandros set off to conquer the Persian Empire, an Epirote Alexander set off to invade Italy and the western Mediterranean. Ironically, it was under very similar circumstances that faced Pyrrhos five decades later. Alexander Molossus was initially successful in Italy, and even entered into a pact with the Romans against the Samnites. Unfortunately for him, his benefactors, the Tarantines, double-crossed him and he lost his favorable position. In 330 he was defeated by an allied army at Pandosia and was killed in the battle. Thus ended the first Epirote foray into Italy.

    Back in Epirus, Aeakides assumed the empty throne. After the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, he played politics in the tumultuous neighboring kingdom of Macedonia, siding with Olympias in her struggle against one of Alexander’s successors, Cassander. Aeakides shared Olympias’ fate, and when she was put to death in 313, he was dethroned simultaneously. His son, soon to be a great general of the ancient age, was then only two years old, and the family had to fly from Epirus to Illyria. Epirus was a Macedonian client state until 306, when Pyrrhus of Epirus, only 12 years old at the time, was put back on the Epirote throne. His early reign was filled with intrigue and interruption as he was dethroned in 301 BC while attending a wedding outside the country. At the age of 17, Pyrrhus was brought on campaign with his brother-in-law, Demetrius, a prince of Macedon, in the Fourth War of the Diadochi. At this point, Demetrius was fighting alongside his father, Antigonus, the then ruler of most of the former empire of Alexander. Arrayed against him were forces under the other Diadochi: Ptolemy, Seleucos, and Lysimachus. The climactic battle of that war was fought at Ipsus in that same year (301), and Pyrrhos’ side was defeated. Antigonus was killed, Demetrius fled back to Greece, and Pyrrhos himself, though he had fought well, was made a hostage of Ptolemy I Soter in a treaty between he and Demetrius.

    Once in Egypt, Pyrrhos charmed the stepdaughter of Ptolemy and made a good impression on the aging king. In 297 Ptolemy re-established Pyrrhos as king of Epirus. Pyrrhos then allied himself with the Lysimachid kingdom in Thrace, and he and Lysimachus invaded Macedonia in 287, successfully deposing Demetrius and jointly ruling the kingdom. The peace between Lysimachus and Pyrrhos did not last long, however, and by 284 Pyrrhos was sent packing from Macedonia back to Epirus. He soon began looking for another avenue of expansion and was not forced to wait long.

    His attention was turned westward in 282, just as Alexander Molossus’ had some 51 years earlier. Once again, the Tarantines were having troubles with their neighbors. This time their neighbors happened to be the Romans. After sinking a Roman flotilla and declaring war in 282, the Tarantines called upon support from Pyrrhos. Pyrrhos, through no love of the Tarantines but rather a desire to become the next Alexander, accepted the invitation. The Tarantines promised him many thousands of allied troops, and after a harrowing crossing from Epirus, he arrived in Tarentum with an army of 26,000 men, including 20 war elephants.

    The Romans advanced a consular army to the vicinity of Tarentum much faster than Pyrrhos had anticipated. This was well before he could receive any significant reinforcement. Worrying that morale might sink if he did not confront the Romans, he set out to find and fight them in 280. The two armies met at Heraclea where the pitched battle was indecisive for many hours until Pyrrhos’ elephants turned the tide in favor of the Epirotes. Having beaten a Roman army, Pyrrhos felt confident enough to march on Rome, which he did to no effect in early 279. The Romans instead kept two consular armies on the move throughout Italy to harass and annoy him. Unable to ignore these threats, Pyrrhos marched south and confronted the Romans again at Asculum. The battle progressed in a fashion similar to that at Heraclea, where the infantry of both sides remained deadlocked for a day before Pyrrhos sent in his elephants and defeated the Romans once more. Even still, the Romans did not sue for peace, and Pyrrhos grew weary of this conflict.

    In the year 278, Pyrrhos faced three choices. He could either stay and fight things out with the pesky and persistent Romans, he could withdraw to Macedonia, where at that time a horde of Celtic invaders were wreaking havoc throughout the countryside, or he could move south and invade Sicily at the behest of the Mamertines, who were currently facing a Carthaginian onslaught. He chose the latter. In 277, he arrived on the shores of Sicily where he swiftly and brilliantly pushed the Carthaginians back to the westernmost part of the island. He sacked their stronghold at Eryx, and left the remnants bottled up in Lilybaeum. Unfortunately at this point he had a falling out with the Syracusans and Mamertines due to his aggressive method of conscripting Sicilians as soldiers. He also received a treaty from the Carthaginians, but imposed harsh terms upon them, so harsh in fact that they refused to accept them. Due to popular opinion being against him and a renewed Carthaginian resistance, he was forced to withdraw from Sicily in 276.

    Back in Italy, he renewed the war he had abandoned against the Romans. Marching north, he fought one more great battle with them at Beneventum. This battle, as at Heraclea and Asculum, was evenly fought overall, except this time the Romans managed to frighten Pyrrhos’ elephants and force him to retreat. With that, Pyrrhos decided to end his Italian adventure once and for all, and withdrew to Epirus in 275, largely broke and weary from years of campaigning.

    Despite this, Pyrrhos once again embarked on war in Macedonia. This time victory proved easy and he deposed the sitting king, Antigonas Gonatas, without much trouble. In 272 he was approached by the Spartan Cleonymus who beseeched him to invade Sparta and place Cleonymus on the throne. Pyrrhos agreed, but blanched when he found Sparta well defended. He took up an offer to intervene in a civic dispute in Argos, but when his army arrived there under cover of night, a confusing street battle erupted. Pyrrhos was killed in the fighting. He was hit on the head by a roof tile, allegedly thrown by an old woman, which allowed him to be swiftly dispatched by an Argive soldier.

    The glory days of Epirus died with Pyrrhos in Argos. The kingdom remained alive and the Molossian dynasty ruled until the 2nd Century BC, during which they blundered into war with the Romans once more. This time the Romans were the invaders and the Epirotes formed an alliance with other Hellenes to fight them off. The Epirotes and many other Hellenes lost their independence when the Romans won the battle of Pydna in 168 BC. In 146 the former Kingdom of Epirus was officially made a Roman province, and would be ruled by the Romans for the next 500 years.


    -Unit Descriptions-



    Phyletai Illyrikoi:
    The tribal groups of southern Illyria provide Epirus with a useful levy of fierce soldiers when needed. Though these soldiers are poor, they fight with tenacity above many in their station. They are armed with spears and ovular shield, relying on their own wits to protect them. For their light armor, they would seem to be weak, but they make excellent flanking troops to tie down an enemy phalanx. They also make wonderful screening troops, since they often have a high morale.

    Historically, the Illyrian tribes were subdued several times during the history of Epirus. They provided an excellent light infantry that fought on many campaigns with their Greek overlords. The Illyrians are a tough people, used to hardships, raids, and invasions. They have an almost fanatical devotion to a strong leader. This makes them valuable above many militia troops.


    Taxeis Hoplitai:
    The poorest levies of Greek, Epirote, and Macedonian cities, while not wielding much clout within their home regions, are at the very least capable when organized along the lines of the more elite hoplites. When organized into the superb phalanxes of the Hellenes, they form a comparatively compitent militia force, owing to the rugged individualism that Hellenistic government inspires in it's populace. They can be expected to hold a line against most light and medium infantry, though they are at greater risk when confronted by missile infantry, as their armor is less then capable of significant resistance. Despite whatever shortcomings they have, they are superb when defending against cavalry, as no right-minded cavalrymen would charge directly into a phalanx - or survive it if he did! Hoplite militia, if used properly and direct confrantations with heavier infantry is avoided, will serve admirably.

    Historically, the poorest citizens of any Polis and the peasants on the estates of Macedonia were called up in the defense of their homeland to fight as Taxeis (militia). They had been used to devastating effect in many ancient battles while forming the second battle line. They were good and courageous soldiers that fought with a degree of discipline that no general before or since was able to expect without a fair degree of training. Peltasts and other units armed with javelins were particularly devastating to the militia hoplites, due to their lack of significant armor on the battlefield


    Taxeis Phalangitai:
    the Taxeis Phalangitai are wealthier members of Epirote society than the majority of the peasants, but are still not in the class to be considered Pezhetairoi (voting property owners). They can afford better equipment than their poorer hoplite brethren. They are armored in good Thracian helmets and quilted cloth armor that can dampen the effects of missiles. Still better, they carry the dreaded sarissa, a six meter long pike. They are disciplined enough to hold a line well, and as property owners, have a lot to lose if a battle does not go their way! They can be used as decent defensive infantry, well able to hold their own against most enemies so long as that enemy is attacking from the front. They are still vulnerable to missiles and flanking attacks, though not as vulnerable as their less able brethren. They are more disciplined and better motivated than their Asiatic or Egyptian counterparts in Seleucid or Ptolemaic armies.

    Historically, the Taxeis Phalangitai were only used during periods of extreme need or times when Macedon was invaded. They represent the lower end of the smallholder class, and as such, are the primary food providers of the social order. They were used only rarely, during invasions. They did give a good account of themselves against the Galatians and Thracian invaders. They were thoroughly trounced by Roman soldiers as they cut down the armies of Philip V and his son.


    Pezhetairoi:
    Pezhetairoi are the bread and butter military unit of the Successor States. They are well disciplined and highly motivated pikemen that are armed and armored to the teeth. They are armored in a linen cuirass, a Thracian cap, a bronze greave on the right leg, stout boots, good bracers, and reinforced shoulder pads made from hardened linen (due to their experience with the deadly curved swords of Thrace). They have Illyrian style round shields attached to their bodies by leather straps that help support the weight of the shield and keep their hand free to grasp the sarissa. They are defensive infantry par excellence. They are the anvil of the two part Macedonian system of warfare, the heavy cavalry being the hammer. They should be used to anchor enemy soldiers while the Thureophoroi harass the flanks and the heavy cavalry smashes into the flanks and rear.

    Historically, the Pezhetairoi are the classic Alexandrian phalanx. They were used to great effect against the Persians, Medes, Bactrians, Indians, Phoenicians, and many, many others. They are an effective force and have not changed much over the centuries. The Romans were able to defeat them as easily as they did for two main reasons. One, the Roman army was at a high state of readiness and tactical prowess after defeating the Carthaginians. Two, the heavy cavalry arm of the Successor armies had degenerated to the point where they were no longer able to field significant numbers to fulfill their part of the hammer and anvil tactic of Alexander. There were many small reasons, numbering among them the misuse of the Thureophoroi, the underuse of Peltasts, and the lax state of warfare that the Successor states were used to. In any case, the phalanx was not as anachronistic or inflexible as widely believed; it was simply used in the wrong way. In the thirteenth century onwards, pikemen in similar formations were able to work wonders with more capable generals and a better cavalry arm. Do not under appreciate pikemen, for they are still a war winning force.


    Thureophoroi Illyrikoi:
    Illyrians have often been a strong and independent foe of their Greek neighbors for some time. During this period, there has been a fair amount of cultural and military influence, despite Hellenic pride, both ways. The Illyrians have learned to fight in ordered formations and with short spears and javelins in order to break up the formations of their Greek enemy. This makes them a dangerous and versatile enemy, due to the fact that they carry an inordinate amount of light javelins and follow a literal shower of these javelins with a thunderous charge. In Epirot armies, they should be used as close combat infantry.

    Historically, the Illyrians were a people that inhabited the northern part of modern day Albania and were bordered in the south by the Greeks of Epirus and Aetolia, and in the east by Macedon and Thessaly. Thus, they had to adapt their warfare to fight these enemies, a task they became frighteningly good at. By the time of Philip of Macedon, they had carved out a fairly large kingdom at the expense of Macedonians and Epirots. Philip married Olympias of Epirus and retook the Macedonian and Epirot provinces for their respective owners, using Parmenio to take the Macedonian portion back. His son Alexander, a product of this marriage alliance against the Illyrians, attacked, subdued, and won over many of the Illyrian tribes. Fairly large contingents of his light infantry in the Persian conquest were of Illyrian extraction. They won their independence once more after Alexander’s death, but were never again to become a major power. The Illyrians as a people were extinguished by the Romans and Illyria became the first Roman province outside of the western Mediterranean. The Illyrians adapted quickly to Roman culture and became the first extremely loyal non-Italic subjects of the growing Empire.


    Thorakitai Illyrikoi:
    The Illyrian tribal warriors in the service of Epirus acquired lamellar plating on their armor, essentially giving them armr equal to a suit of mail. This allowed them to fight the Romans on a more equal footing. They are armed much the same as other thorakitai, with a thureos, bronze greaves, heavy armor, and a standard thracian style helmet. They fight much the same as other Thorakitai, but with slightly less discipline and more ferocity. This comes largely from their tribal nature as the fierceness of the Illyrians is legendary. They should be used as standard heavy infantry, able to soften an enemy up with javelins and charge in with thier spears.

    Historically, Illyrian warriors who could afford (or were provided) armor were generally better trained and braver than man of their fellows. They stood up well to Greek and Roman soldiers, but ultimately did not have the numbers or organization to truly create a powerful Illyrian state. Instead, the southern Illyrians have wedded themselves to Epirot fortunes, for good or ill.


    Agema Chaonion:
    The Chaeonian Guards are the flower of the Epirot army. Their armor is iron lamellar fastened to a thick linen backing, giving them a protective suit that can stop spears and arrows with equal proficiency. They wear good quality thracian helmets and greaves, both constructed of quality iron. This, and their proficiency with their swords, makes them the most versatile and capable of the sarissa bearing units. They are extremely elite pikemen, often able to fight their way out of nearly impossible situations. They can be called upon to stand firm where others would simply break and run. They are to be used as both a heavy pike unit and an assault infantry, since their heavy armor allows them the luxury of this role.

    Historically, the Chaeonian Guards were the personal soldiers of the Molossian King. As such, they were essentially his companions, whereas in Macedon the pikemen were of a lower class than the upper nobility. These men were the solid wall upon which Rome impaled itself at every battle that it lost to Pyrrhus. Approach them with caution, for they have never, ever broken and ran.


    Sphendonetai:
    The slingers are the second part of the Psiloi, and are only marginally more useful than their compatriots with javelins. Their slings can prove a deadly weapon, but they are mainly used to harass and annoy enemy soldiers to force a premature or rash action. They are mostly poor peasants that use this weapon to provide a meager amount of protein in their already poor diet.

    Historically, slingers were uses pretty well. They were used in similar roles to the ones described above. Alexander employed his slingers to harass the Persian heavy cavalry until it decided to give fight at Gaugamela, which promptly cut it off from the rest of the Persian army and allowed the better armed and armored Companions to cut it to shreds.


    Toxotai:
    Toxotai are the third branch of the psiloi, the archers of Hellenic and Makedonian armies. They are generally from the upper end of the poor and are generally recruited from mountainous regions where the use of the bow is an essential skill to keep one’s flock of sheep safe from roving predators. Toxotai are well trained in a manner of speaking, that being that they are using their weapon of choice (often of necessity) from birth. They make decent archers, but are nowhere near as professional as the archers from the east and south. They generally use the short bow, which means that they are often outgunned by their counterparts from other lands. This reflects their secondary role on a Hellenic battlefield. As most archers, they will be cut to ribbons in melee, so they should be protected well from any harm.

    Historically, the Hellenes did not use archers in any significant fashion. They did not have the composite bows of their neighbors, and their lands were not particularly suited to the cattle and horse farming that supplied the raw material for these bows. Therefore, archers had the effect of other psiloi, that of long range harassment. Hellenes and Makedonians had no real tradition of archers and could not recruit any but these shepherds to do this work for them, since they lacked any access to the archers of the east. Most Hellenic states relied on Skythian and most importantly Kretan archers to do this for them.


    Hippeis:
    Hellenic cavalry is not the most awe inspiring and powerful in the world, but they are no slouches either. Hippeis are a mix of good old fashioned Hellenic know-how with the practical needs for an effective medium cavalry force. The result is the wedding of linen armor, attic helmets, and hoplon shields to cavalry spears and the kopis, which produces a warrior with excellent equipment. Since they are mainly drawn from elite nobility, these cavalrymen have high morale and good discipline. They ride stout horses whose stock was imported from the north. They are an able, if not spectacular, medium cavalry.

    Historically, Hellenic cavalry was always thought of as better than Roman cavalry, even though it was not particularly significant. The Hellenes have enough trouble keeping the equestrian minded Makedonians to the north at bay without having to worry about doing much of significant note.

    A few extra action shots:





    EPIROTE RELIGION

    Zeus Dodonaios:
    The worship of Zeus Dodonaios, or Zeus in his particular form and manifestation as worshiped at the holy sanctuary and oracle at Dodona, is very ancient. The god reveals his wishes to his priests in the rustling of the leaves of the sacred oak at Dodona. The oak has long been sacred to Zeus, as the laurel is to Apollo, and the ivy to Dionysos. When he is present at Dodona, he resides inside the holy oak, and representations of the god are found carved into its trunk in niches. Zeus Dodonaios is a revelation of the god, who is still responsible for all the things for which he is known throughout traditional Hellenic religion. He is primarily the god of the sky, of rain and the thunderbolt, which is his chief weapon. He is also responsible for the safety of travelers, for the keeping of oaths, and for being the single most powerful entity in the cosmos, save for fate itself. At Dodona his oracular aspects are obviously emphasized, and the popularity is such that smaller oracles often spring up in other towns in the region where he is found. Any sanctuary built to worship him, must include a sacred oak grown from the acorns of the one at Dodona itself.

    Artemis:
    The goddess Artemis was worshipped across the Hellenic world, but sometimes had great variations on what is typically the goddess’ classical form. In Epeiros and the Western Hellenic world, the goddess assumed the warlike form of the huntress. She protected the animals of the forests and mountainsides, but also the hunters, who followed her rules and worshipped her as well. She was the patron goddess of Syrakousai, and the name of her island of birth, Ortygia (which means “quail”), was the name of the citadel there, which she protected. Her spear is found on Epeirote coinage, and representations of that and other of her symbols were common across lands they came in contact with. She provided protection on land and in the sea, with the dolphins and other sea creatures who obeyed her commands. The swift-footed huntress was quick to anger and quite deadly. Her worshippers were not that different. They sought her help in protecting themselves in and preparing for battle, and they sought her protection for their wives, who prayed to Artemis in her guise as a helper goddess of childbirth. With her protection the Hellenes expected a fortuitous increase in births.

    Dionysos:
    Dionysos. Ivy-crowned, loud-crying, oft-hymned, wanderer in woody forests and foreign lands, conceived by a human mother of the great god himself, born not of her but of the thigh of Zeus himself, curly-locked, splendidly dressed, effeminate to some but a powerful and angry god to any who doubt him, master of panthers and mountain beasts, of everything wild and of the vine as well, wild but tamed by his allowance and the hand of man. Dionysos is a god of many contradictions, a late-comer or so the Hellenes thought. His worship in Epeiros was common and his most famous initiate and devotee was surely Olympias herself, the Epirote princess who became the mother of Megas Alexandros.The worship of Dionysos brings certain benefits particularly to the Epeirotes and their subjects. The wooded mountain haunts of northern Hellas are welcoming to Dionysos’ worship, and he brings greater happiness to his worshippers than most other gods, thanks to the wild enthusiasm and secret rites in which they partake. He is the chief god of the theater, and our great leader Pyrrhos constructed a giant theater at Dodona in his honor, early in the king’s reign. As a conqueror also, Dionysos serves as an appropriate hero as he did for Alexandros, who patterned his looks and dress and general extravagance on the god, or so men say. But beware. Even Alexandros was unable to stave off the excesses that Dionysos may sometimes bring his devotees. It is publicly stated that Alexandros died of some disease or exhaustion after his travels, or even that the gods were jealous of his exploits and called him to their number sooner than mortals would have liked, but it is no secret that he died from an overindulgence of drink.

    Serapis and Isis:
    The Epeirotes were among the most devoted followers of Ssrapis and Isis on the Hellenic mainland. By the fourth century, the worship of Isis had begun in Hellas at the Athenian port of Peiraieus by Aigyptians living there. Sarapis was originally an Anatolian deity, but was brought to Aigyptos by Ptolemaios, and thence to the rest of the Hellenic world through trade and other contacts. The joint cult of the two deities became very popular, and often had worshippers of other gods and goddesses included within its walls. The cult’s officers soon were drawn from the ranks of other state officials and from the start it was highly Hellenized: the language of the cult was Hellenic and the practices had a Hellenic character. They included interpretations of dreams, banquets for cult festivals, incubation, and societies for initiated members. A city-state cult and a mystery cult combined thus became extremely popular wherever the Hellenes were exposed to Aigyptians. With the contacts the royal house of the Aiakides had with the Ptolemaioi, it is not surprising that the cult became popular in Epeiros as well. It was very popular to the mercenaries and soldiers fighting under Pyrrhos and also appealed greatly to the lower classes. Banquets and festivals, and more interaction on a personal level with the god were hallmarks of the worship of Sarapis and Isis. It brought much happiness to the inhabitants of Epeirote cities to have a great cult center of these gods located within their walls, and they resulted in a more outward looking frame of mind for those places, with other merchants and traders and mercenaries passing through their gates and bringing more contact with the rest of the Hellenic world.

    We've also decided to let you have a look at some of the new (and for the most part pretty rare) ethnicities for the Epeirote characters that VandalCarthage has worked up for us. We already have some ethnic traits ready for them, but these will be additional ones:

    Ardiaios - This man is a member of the Ardiaioi, one of the strongest inland tribes of the Illyroi. He and his fellow tribesman have for many years enjoyed fairly positive relations with the Makedonians and Hellenes, adopting some of their practices as their own, though some of the latter would still consider him 'barbaric.' Though his tribe does not frequent the government of the Epeirote League or the administration of the King of the Molossians, he is very well disposed towards command and frontier rule.
    More often Brutal
    More often Drink
    More often YellowBileHumour
    Rarely Prim
    Slightly Less often Stoic
    Slightly More often Gambling
    Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    Slightly More often Feck
    More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    More often StrategicSkill
    More often GoodInfantryCommander
    Less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Scholarly
    Slightly More often Unschooled
    More often NaturalEnergy
    More often Loyal
    Very Occasionally Despoiler
    Very Occasionally Genocide
    Better governor in Epeirote type3-4 government
    Poorer governor in Epeirote type1 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Agrianos - This man is a member of the Agrianes, a tribe of fairly skilled mountaineers, favored by Alexandros for their chief's service to him during his long campaigns. He and his fellow tribesman have for some years enjoyed at least somewhat positive relations with the Makedonians, but have not generally been bettered by the contact, and this man is no exception, leading to the general conclusion that despite his prowess and skill in combat - he is still something of a 'barbarian.' For this reason, he is best suited to military command, and administration in the Epeirote frontier (though only when absolutely necessary).
    More often Brutal
    More often YellowBileHumour
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Much More often Harsh Justice
    More often Feck
    Much More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Much More often StrategicSkill
    Much More often GoodInfantryCommander
    Slightly less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Less often MathematicsSkill
    Less often Scholarly
    Less often Aesthetic
    Much More often Unschooled
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Much More often Loyal
    Occasionally Despoiler
    Occasionally Genocide
    Better governor in Epeirote type3 government
    Poorer governor in Epeirote type1, 2, 4 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Autariatos - This man is a member of the Autariatai, one of the most powerful tribes of the Illyrioi prior to the march of Alexandros through their lands, though they are still a proud and strong people. He and his fellow tribesmen claim direct descent from the prolific Illyrios, through his son Autarieus. Though this man comes from a more culturally advanced background, he's not likely to appear at a philosophical lecture, and many Hellenes are apt to recall his people's failed attack on the Great Conqueror himself. For these reasons, he's best suited to government outside of Epeiros and Makedon, and is much more disposed towards skilled command and effective administration.
    More often Brutal
    More often Drink
    Much less often Prim
    Slightly Less often Stoic
    Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    More often StrategicSkill
    More often GoodInfantryCommander
    Slightly Less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Slightly Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Scholarly
    More often NaturalEnergy
    More often Loyal
    Very Occasionally Despoiler
    Better governor in Epeirote type3-4 government
    Slightly better governor in Epeirote type2 government
    Poorer governor in Epeirote type1 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Dalmatikos - This man is a member of the Dalmatai, a far-flung tribe of urbanized, agrarian Illyrios. Though his people have yet to rise to prominence among their rival tribes, his agricultural experience is useful on the Epeirote frontier, while his settled upbringing lends itself to some skill as an infantrymen and administrator of non-Hellenes.
    More often Brutal
    More often YellowBileHumour
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Much More often Harsh Justice
    More often Feck
    Much More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Much More often StrategicSkill
    Much More often GoodInfantryCommander
    More often GoodTrader
    Slightly less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Less often MathematicsSkill
    Less often Aesthetic
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Much More often Loyal
    Occasionally Despoiler
    Occasionally Genocide
    Better governor in Epeirote type3 government
    Poorer governor in Epeirote type1, 2, 4 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Dardanos - This man is a member of the Dardanoi, a tribe of confrontational Illyrioi, frequently at ends with the Makedonians. His tribe operates largely under the authority of the Ardiaioi, leaving its old leaders to exercise their independence in only measured amounts over a much smaller domain. Though their fortunes have fallen, many of their people recall the glory of their ancient accord with the Trojans over the Troad, and their great founder Dardanos - son of Zeus and Elektra. Though a servant of the Epeirotes, this man resents most other Illyroi under their dominion, and is even less fond of the Makedonians and barbarized foreign Hellenes. His background leads him mostly to command, where he can capture some measure of recognition and power for his tribe, leaving him ill-disposed towards settled government.
    Much More often Brutal
    More often YellowBileHumour
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Much More often Harsh Justice
    More often Feck
    Much More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Much More often StrategicSkill
    Much More often GoodInfantryCommander
    More often GoodTrader
    Less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Less often MathematicsSkill
    Less often Aesthetic
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Slightly less often Loyal
    Occasionally Despoiler
    Occasionally Genocide
    Poorer governor in Epeirote type1, 2, 4 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Enchelios - This man is a member of the Encheliai, a powerful tribe of the Illyrioi, with a proud history of government, command, and organization. His people were the first sons of Illyrios to coalesce into a powerful, working state, though it did not endure for too many centuries. Though some Hellenes resent their ancient raids into their Northern lands, attacking among other things the Oracle of Delphi, he is still a compitent governor, possessed of a somewhat keener intelligence then his fellows. With this background, he is best suited to government outside of Epeirote home territories, but is still reasonably capable of administration elsewhere.
    Slightly More often Brutal
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    Slightly More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Slightly More often StrategicSkill
    Slightly More often GoodInfantryCommander
    Much More often GoodTrader
    Slightly less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Slightly Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Aesthetic
    Very Slightly more often Scholarly
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Much More often Loyal
    Better governor in Epeirote type3 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Liburnos - This man is a member of the Liburnoi, an impressive maritime tribe of mixed Italiote/Illyrioi origin, that once controlled many of the islands now well settled by Hellenes off their Western Coast. Though their fortunes have sunken somewhat since then, they are still skilled sailors and traders, and exercise some influence among their neighboring tribes. His experience with ships and command coupled with a moderate adoption of Hellenic cultural traits, make him a fairly skilled governor and general, though he has an even keener eye for trading.
    Slightly More often Drink
    Less often Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    Slightly More often Rabblerouser
    Slightly More often InspiringSpeaker
    More often StrategicSkill
    Slightly More often GoodInfantryCommander
    Slightly Less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Slightly Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Scholarly
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Much more often GoodTrader
    More often GoodAdministrator
    More often Loyal
    Very Occasionally Despoiler
    Better governor in Epeirote type3-4 government
    Slightly better governor in Epeirote type2 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Taulantios - This man is a member of the Taulantioi, a large Illyrioi tribe north of the Epeirote homelands, where the old adoptive father of Pyrrhos ruled before the son of the rebel Kleitos, Bardylis II ascended the throne. For centuries they've interacted with the Hellenes and Makedonian dynasts, first giving sanctuary to Kleitos after his rebellion against Alexandros failed, and then when they were forced out of their Eastern territories. His tribe has a proud history of government, and despite Epeirote expansionism, a precedent for good relations, as well as a history of limited assimilation of Hellenik culture, giving him a marked advantage in central Epeirote government.
    Slightly More often Brutal
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    Slightly More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Slightly More often StrategicSkill
    More often GoodInfantryCommander
    More often GoodTrader
    Slightly less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Slightly Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Aesthetic
    Slightly more often Scholarly
    More often NaturalEnergy
    Much More often Loyal
    Better governor in Epeirote type1 and 2 government

    -----------------------------------------------------

    Eneteios - This man is a member of the Enetoi, an Illyrioi tribe that long ago transplanted itself to the far North of the lands populated by the children of Illyrios. His people have long held some regard from Hellenes and even the independent peoples of Italia, and their commanders tribal leaders are competent administrators and their seaman are reasonably skilled traders. Though his people's star has never really been on the ascendant, it is looked on with some respect by others - lending him to some open-mindedness, and greater skill in government.
    Rarely Prim
    Less often Stoic
    Very Slightly More often Harsh Justice
    Very Slightly More often Rabblerouser
    More often InspiringSpeaker
    Slightly More often StrategicSkill
    Very Slightly More often GoodInfantryCommander
    More often GoodDefender
    Much More often GoodTrader
    Slightly less often GoodCavalryCommander
    Slightly Less often MathematicsSkill
    Slightly Less often Aesthetic
    Very Slightly more often Scholarly
    Slightly more often Good Trader
    Slightly more often GoodAdministrator
    More often NaturalEnergy
    More often Loyal
    Better governor in Epeirote type3 government

    And we can’t forget the small SIG to prove your renewed allegiance to EB:


    We heartily invite our fans to use these sigs. They’re here for you, and we delight to see them be used by our great fans!

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    We hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s update!

    Please note that unless stated otherwise, ALL pictures shown in our previews are of works in progress. We continue to improve on all parts of EB, and we will continue to do so long after our initial release.

    Since some areas where these news items are posted cannot handle wide images, we appreciate your restraint from quoting full-size images.

    As always, if you have questions or comments, the best place to post them is here, where the EB team is most active:

    Europa Barbarorum ORG forum

    Europa Barbarorum TWC forum

    We give special thanks to Imageshack that provides us with a simple, foolproof, and free way to show you all these pictures each week.


    Have a great day!


    Sincerely,

    The Europa Barbarorum team.

  2. #2
    A$$A$$IN's Avatar Wimmer
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    Wow a new update! This is awsome guys keep it up.

  3. #3
    Illyrian's Avatar Chinen
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    illyrian history, so so. Illyrian preview, awesome. Good job

  4. #4
    Fabolous's Avatar Power breeds Arrogance
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    Crap, this made me go spend two hours playing my Epeirot campaign. Nice stuff though.
    tBP knows how to handle a sword. -Last Crusader

    Under the Honorable Patronage of Belisarius
    Formerly Under the Patronage of Simetrical
    Proud Patron of Lusted, Rome AC, Solid, and Dirty Peasant

  5. #5
    RZZZA's Avatar Praefectus Legionis
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    Great stuff....have you done one for the arverni yet? I'm in the middle of my Arverni campaign right now

  6. #6
    Murakawa
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    Thanks for releasing this.

  7. #7
    Legio XX Valeria Victrix's Avatar Great Scott!
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    Yay! My preview made it to the public! Thanks Tel! School and work just got to be too much for me, but I hope you guys keep rolling. The OB is great! I'll pop my head in occasionally to see how things are going. Once again, good luck in the future, esp. with the modellers and skinners!


    "For what is the life of a man, if it is not interwoven with the life of former generations by a sense of history?" - Cicero

  8. #8
    Rosacrux redux's Avatar Civitate
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    Nice indeed... having played the Epirotes in the beta, I can't wait for the complete faction to hit the next version... Although you are Illyri-izing them too much methinks in some aspects. It's nice to have them retain a unique character, though.

    Winner of the - once upon a time - least popular TWC
    TOPIC award

    Υπό την αιγίδα του Tacticalwithdrawal
    under the patronage of Tacticalwithdrawal


    Naughty bros: Red Baron and Polemides

  9. #9
    Civitate
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    I hope there'll be a bunch of more units for the Epirote army to make them even more a mix of barbarian tribsemen and hellenized monarchy. What I'd suggest however is to remove the war between Epirus and Macedon. It forces one to deliver a knockout blow against Macedonia early and makes it kind of uncomfortable to pursue other expansion strategies (e.g. completing Phyrrus' dream of a Magna Graeca from Sicily to Ambracia with an Epirote king). I know there might have been a war in history but as the ai is rather unagreeable this leads me to take Pella and Demtrius quickly and confine Macedonia to Greece. As it stands I have to kick them out of the race pretty early when it is rather easy to do so. I'd kind of liket o have them build up strength from time to time by expanding east and north instead of taking a beating by me.

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