Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 65

Thread: French Army Regimental Names

  1. #1
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default French Army Regimental Names

    French Army
    This thread aims to respond to requests for a list of French unit names. To produce this list I will draw on a wide range of books [Elting “Swords Around a Throne”; Haythornthwaite “The Napoleonic Source Book”; Otto von Pivla “Armies of the Napoleonic Era”; Blond “La Grande Armee”; various Osprey Men at Arms; Rogers “Napoleon’s Army”; Digby-Smith “Napoleon's Regiments: Battle Histories of the Regiments of the French Army, 1792-1815”; Chartrand “Napoleonic Wars – Napoleon’s Armies”; various Histoire et Collections including “La Cavalrie Légère du Premier Empire”; various Almark books including Head “Foot Regiments of the Imperial Guard” & Bukhari “French Napoleonic Line Infantry 1796-1815”; Johnson “The French Cavalry 1792-1915” & “Napoleon’s Cavalry and its Leaders”; Charmy & Bucquoy etc]; magazine articles (Tradition, Age of Napoleon, Little Wars etc) and various websites (definitely not including Wiki!).

    Hopefully the resulting lists will provide a useful (but not exhaustive) guide/tool for players of Napoleon: Total War who like the units they recruit to have more realistic titles. For Regimental numbers use: 1er for first, 2e or 2ème for 2nd etc.

    Line

    Infantry

    The 1803 reorganisation saw Demi-Brigades replaced by Regiments. Most regiments had 3 battalions; some had 4 battalions. The term demi-brigade was used thereafter for provisional formations.

    In 1804 all Ligne (Line) battalions comprised 7 companies of Fusiliers, 1 company of Grenadiers and 1 company of Voltigeurs (some battalions did not complete converting their 8th company of Fusiliers into Voltigeurs until 1806). All Légère (Light) battalions comprised 7 companies of Chasseurs, 1 company of Carabiniers (equivalent to Grenadiers in Regiments de Ligne) and 1 company of Voltigeurs. Headquarters for 3 battalion Regiment was 36 personnel, while a 4 battlion regiment it was 42 personnel; Grenadier & carabinier companies comprised 83 personnel, while Fusilier, Chasseur & Voltigeur companies comprised 123 personnel.

    The decree of 18 February 1808 confirmed changes that appear to have already been set in motion, namely that all regiments should comprise 5 battlions (4 bataillons de guerre [war] & 1 Dépột). Ligne battalions comprised 4 companies of Fusiliers, 1 company of Grenadiers and 1 company of Voltigeurs. Légère battalions comprised 4 companies of Chasseurs, 1 company of Carabiniers and 1 company of Voltigeurs. All companies had a theoretical strength of 140 men.

    In 1812 Napoleon ordered all infantry Regiments to form a 6th bataillon as a bataillon de guerre; the 5th bataillon remained as the Dépột. Apart from Davout’s corps not many others formed this bataillon.

    By mid-1813 two regiments (6th Ligne & 14th Légère) had 8 battalions, thirty regiments (9th & 18th Légère, 10th, 13th, 15th, 20th, 23rd, 32nd, 70th, 82nd, 134th Ligne - still tracking down remainder) had 6 battalions, one hundred and thirty six regiments had 5 battalions and six regiments had only 4 battalions.


    Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

    The 1803 reorganisation resulted in 90 line regiments (they were not numbered sequentially) numbered 1st to 112th. 19 regiments had 4 battalions, the remaining 71 had 3 battalions.

    Regiments with 4 battalions were:-
    2nd, 3rd, 5th, 11th, 15th, 17th, 20th, 21st, 23rd, 24th, 34th, 35th, 37th, 56th, 60th, 62nd, 79th, 92nd & 93rd.

    Vacant regiment numbers in 1803 were: -
    31st, 38th, 41st, 49th, 68th, 71st, 73rd, 74th, 77th, 78th, 80th, 83rd, 87th, 90th, 91st, 97th, 98th, 99th, 104th, 107th, 109th & 110th.

    Further regiments were raised as follows:

    1808
    113th formed from Tuscan troops.
    114th to 120th formed from provisional regiments in Spain.
    1809
    121st & 122nd formed from survivors of Legions de Reserve.
    1810
    123rd to 126th formed from former Dutch regiments.
    1811
    127th to 129th formed from Hanseatic states & Hanoverian Legion.
    130th formed from auxiliary battalions in Spain.
    1812
    131st to 133rd formed from Disciplinary Regiments. (131st from Régiment de Walcheren, 132nd from Régiment de L’Isle-de-Ré, 133rd from Régiment de la Méditerranée).
    1813
    134th formed from Garde de Paris.
    135th to 142nd and 144th to 156th formed from battalions of the National Guard.
    143rd formed in 1813 in Catalonia from battalions of the National Guard.
    1814
    104th formed from battalions drawn from other Regiments (17th, 52nd & 101st Line).
    107th formed from battalions drawn from other Regiments (6th, 10th, 20th, & 102nd).

    Régiment d'Infanterie Légère

    The 1803 reorganisation resulted in 27 light regiments (they were not numbered sequentially) numbered 1st to 31st. 3 regiments had 4 battalions, the remaining 24 had 3 battalions.
    Regiments with 4 battalions were:- 7th, 16th & 25th.
    Vacant regimental numbers were:– 11th, 19th, 20th & 30th.

    Further regiments were raised as follows:
    1808
    32nd formed from Genoese & Tuscan troops.
    1810
    33rd formed from Dutch light infantry.
    1811
    34th formed from auxiliary battalions in Spain.
    11th formed from Tirailleurs de Corse, Tirailleurs du Po, Legion du Midi & Bataillon de Valaison.
    29th formed from survivors of the garrison of the Ile de France.
    1812
    35th & 36th formed from disciplinary battalions (35th from 1st Régiment de la Méditerranée; 36th from Régiment de Belle-Ile.
    1813
    37th formed from Departmental Compagnies de Reserve
    1814
    19th formed.


    Temporary Formations
    Apart from Régiments de Ligne & Légère, the French utilised temporary units such as the five “Légions de Réserve de l’interieur” which were formed from surplus conscripts in 1807 and 1808. Each Legion had four 8 company infantry battalions and 1 company of artillery. 11 battalions were lost at Bailen; the remaining 9 battalions became the 121st and 122nd Line.

    Seven bataillons auxiliaries d’infanterie were formed in 1810 from regimental depots of units who were not serving in Spain. In 1811 they became the 130th Ligne and 34th Légère.

    Régiments de Marche often formed with detachments from a mix of units to deliver ‘trained’ troops from the depots to frontline units. The formation was dissolved when it reached its destination.

    Oudinot's "Grenadier division"
    December 1805 Oudinot's "Grenadier division" raised and organized as follows:
    1st Grenadier Regiment - 13th & 58th Ligne
    2nd Grenadier Regiment - 9th & 81st Ligne
    3rd Grenadier Regiment - 2nd & 3rd Légère
    4th Grenadier Regiment - 28th & 31st Légère
    5th Grenadier Regiment - 12th & 15th Légère
    By 10 January 1807 the Division had undergone a major reorganization:
    1st Regiment
    1st Battalion: 27th Legere (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 94th & 95th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    2nd Battalion: 8th, 45th & 54th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    2nd Regiment
    3rd Battalion: 9th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 32nd & 96th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    4th Battalion: 30th, 33rd & 51st Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    3rd Regiment
    5th Battalion: 10th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 24th & 26th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    6th Battalion: 4th, 18th & 57th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    4th Regiment
    7th Battalion: 17th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 21st & 34th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    8th Battalion: 40th, 64th & 88th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    5th Regiment
    9th Battalion: 6th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 39th & 69th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    10th Battalion: 27th, 59th & 76th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    6th Regiment
    11th Battalion: 16th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 44th & 105th Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    12th Battalion: 7th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs), 24th & 63rd Line (Grenadiers & Voltigeurs)
    7th Regiment
    13th Battalion: 25th Légère (Carabiniers); 28th Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs)

    On 1 June 1807 the division contained:
    1st Regiment
    1st Battalion: Carabiniers from 6th, 7th, 9th, 16th, 25th & 27th Légère
    2nd Battalion: Voltigeurs from 6th, 7th, 9th, 16th, 25th & 27th Légère
    2nd Regiment
    3rd Battalion: Grenadiers from 8th, 30th, 33rd, 51st, 95th & 96th Ligne
    4th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 8th, 30th, 33rd, 51st, 95th & 96th Ligne
    3rd Regiment
    5th Battalion: Carabiniers from 10th, 17th, 21st, 24th, 26th & 28th Légère
    6th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 10th, 17th, 21st, 24th, 26th & 28th Légère
    4th Regiment
    7th Battalion: Grenadiers from 4th, 18th, 34th, 40th, 64th & 88th Ligne
    8th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 4th, 18th, 34th, 40th, 64th & 88th Ligne
    5th Regiment
    9th Battalion: Grenadiers from 27th, 39th, 45th, 59th, 69th & 70th Ligne
    10th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 27th, 39th, 45th, 59th, 69th & 70th Ligne
    6th Regiment
    11th Battalion: Grenadiers from 24th, 44th, 54th, 63rd, 94th & 105th Ligne
    12th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 24th, 44th, 54th, 63rd, 94th & 105th Ligne
    7th Regiment
    13th Battalion: Carabiniers from 22nd & 25th Légère; and Grenadiers from 32nd, 57th & 65th Line
    14th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 22nd, 32nd, 57th & 65th Line
    8th Regiment
    15th Battalion: Grenadiers from 3rd, 61st, 85th & 111th Line
    16th Battalion: Voltigeurs from 3rd, 61st, 85th & 111th Line

    These regiments were disbanded after the 1807 campaign in Poland.

    Disciplinary Units

    Dépôts de conscripts réfractaire – created in 1804 and divided between 11 citadels which functioned as military depots (Lille, Givet, Charlemont, Luxembourg, Strasbourg, Besançon, Briançon, Perpignan, Bayonne, Caen & Alexandrie). The conscripts were divided into 160 men companies. On 27 January 1810 and 11 March 1811 the troops in the depots and the departments of the Alps were formed into the 1st (based in Ajaccio) and 2nd (based in Toulon) Régiment de la Méditerranée. On 24 June 1811 new depots were established on Île de Re, Belle Île and Île de Walcheren. In 1812 Île de Walcheren became 131st Ligne, Île de Re became 132nd Ligne & Belle Île became 36th Légère. On 20 September 1812 the Régiments de la Méditerranée became 35th Légère and 133rd Ligne.

    Foreign & Auxiliary Troops

    Régiments Étranger [Foreign Regiments]

    Régiment de la Tour d’Auvergne – created 30 September 1805 with 3 battalions of 9 companies; 4th battalion formed in 1809; became 1st Régiment Étranger on 3 August 1811; 5th and 6th battalions formed in 1811.

    Régiment d’Isembourg - created 1 November 1805 with a headquarters and 3 battalions of 9 companies (3,224 men). The decree of 16 October 1810 reorganized into 6 battalions each of six companies inline with the 1808 reorganisation for French units. On 3 August 1811 became 2nd Régiment Étranger.

    Régiment Irlandaise – created 31 August 1803 as a batallion, became La Légion Irlandaise in 1805, in 1809 became Régiment Irlandaise with 2 battalions, became 3rd Régiment Étranger with 5 battalions on 3 August 1811.

    Régiment de Prusse - created 13 November 1806 with 4 batallions; became 4th Régiment Étranger on 3 August 1811 incorporating Légion Hanôverienne on 9 August 1811. Ceased to exist between 1813-14.

    Other Foreign Troops
    Régiment de Westphalie - created 11 December 1806; 4 battalions of 6 companies;reduced to 2 battalions in October 1807; renamed Bataillon de Westphalie when its strength fell to 1 battalion. Incorporated into Légion Hanôverienne on 30 September 1809.

    Légion Hanôverienne – created 13 April 1804 with 2 battalions and 2 squadrons of Chasseur à Cheval. Incorporated into 4th Régiment Étranger on 3 August 1811.

    Légion Piédmontaise (Légion du Midi) – created 18 May 1803 with an effective strength of 4,000 (4 legions – each the equivalent of a French line battalion). 2 battalions sent to the West Indies. In 1804 the remaining 2 battalions renamed Légion du Midi. Strength fell to 1 battalion in 1808 and in 1811 became part of 82nd Line and 11th & 31st Light.

    Bataillon Valisan – on 8 October 1805 a 5 company battalion was raised by the Swiss canton Valais which broke away from Switzerland in 1802. Valais was incorporated into the French Empire on 12 September 1810. As a result the battalion was disbanded and incorporated into 11th Light on 16 September 1811.

    Bataillon de Neuchâtel – on 11 May 1807 a battalion of 6 companies (1 grenadier, 1 voltigeur & 4 Fusilier) was created; a company of foot artillery was attached from 27 August 1808. The Unit was disbanded on 1 June 1814.

    Légion du Nord – created 20 September 1806 with 4 battalions. On 23 September 1806 it became 1st Légion du Nord when Napoleon decreed the formation of the 2nd Légion du Nord. Both Legions had the same organisation. Legion headquarters of 33 personnel; each battalion was composed of 9 companies - 1 Carabinier, 1 Voltigeur & 7 Chasseur. Each company was authorised to have 139 personnel. On 1 September 1807 the Legions passed under the command of the King of Saxony

    La Légion Polacco-Italienne – on the 5 April 1807 Napoleon ordered the reconstitution of the old Légion Polonaise out of the remains of Polish units in Italy. The Légion comprised 3 infantry regiments and 1 cavalry regiment with 3 squadrons. In October 1807 the Légion passed into the service of Westphalia and in early 1808 it was ordered to Paris and renamed La Légion Polacco-Italienne. On 28 March the Légion entered French service. It later took the name Légion de la Vistule.

    Légion de la Vistule – on 24 June 1808 the Légion de la Vistule was constituted with a strength of 3 infantry regiments (each of 2 battalions of 6 companies – 1 grenadier, 1 voltigeur and 4 fusilier, each company had 140 men - and a separate joint 6 company depot battalion) entitled Régiment d’Infanterie de la Legion de la Vistule” and 1 cavalry regiment entitled “Régiment des lanciers de la Légion de la Vistule”. In 1809 a 2nd Légion comprising 3 infantry regiments was authorised but on 12 February 1810 it became the 4th infantry regiment of the original Légion. On 7 February 1811 the cavalry regiment became the 1st when the “2nd Régiment des lanciers de la Légion de la Vistule” was formed. On 18 June 1811 both cavalry regiments were transferred into the French line cavalry as the 7th and 8th Chevau-Léger-Lanciers. In 1813 the remnants of the Legion were grouped into the Régiment de la Vistule.

    Bataillon Septinsulaire – created in 1807 as a light infantry battalion with former Venetian troops. Disbanded 1814.

    Régiment Albanais –passed into French service in 1807 (previously in pay of Russia) as a 3 battalion regiment consisting of 9 companies each. Reorganised in 1809 into a 6 battalion regiment. Greeks within the unit formed a separate 8 company (3 elite companies!) Battalion de Chasseurs à Pied du Grec. On 6 November 1813 the regiment was reduced to 2 battalions (consisting of 1 elite company and 5 of Fusiliers each). It passed into British service in June 1814.

    Chasseurs à Cheval Ioniens – created on 27 November 1807 with 1 squadron; reduced to 1 company on 13 December 1808. Disbanded in 1814.

    Bataillon des Chasseurs d’Orient – formed 7 January 1802 and disbanded 24 September 1814.

    Légion du Corses – formed on 12 January 1800. On 18 April 1805 reorganised into a 5 battalion (each of 5 companies) Régiment d’Infanterie Légère Corse. The Légion passed into service of the Kingdom of Naples on 10 January 1807 as 3 battalion Regiment “Royal Corse”.

    Régiments Suisse – on 27 September 1803 the Swiss cantons agreed to supply 4 infantry regiments of 4 battalions of 1,000 men each in 9 companies (1 grenadier & 8 fusilier). Regimental headquarters comprised 43 men, grenadier company 92 men and fusilier company 112 men. 1st Régiment Suisse formed on 15 March 1805, the remainder in October 1806. a voltigeur company was added in 1807 to all battalions which meant that each battalion had 10 companies. A regimental foot artillery company was attached to the 1st regiment on 1 April 1807; similar companies were attached to the other regiments on 10 December 1811. The Swiss switched to the standard 6 company (1 grenadier, 1 voltigeur and 4 fusilier) battalion organisation in 1812 though none seem to have had more than 3 bataillon de guerre.

    Tirailleurs du Pô – created 20 August 1803. On 8 September 1811 became part of 11th Legere.

    Tirailleurs Corse – Formed in 1802 as the 3rd Battalion of the Legion du Corses. Became part of 8th Légère in May 1803. In April 1804 became an independent battalion named Tirailleurs du Corse with 10 companies (1 Carabinier, 1 Voltigeur & 8 Chasseur). By September 1810 the battalion comprised 6 companies (1 Carabinier, 1 Voltigeur & 4 Chasseur) and 1 depot company. On 8 September 1811 became part of 11th Legere.

    Régiment Joseph-Napoléon – Four battalions were raised on 9 February 1809 from the debris of Romana’s Spanish Corps (and Spanish prisoners of war). Reduced to 2 battalions (1 war & 1 depot) in 1813. Disbanded on 25 November 1813 and transformed into a regiment of Pionniers Espagnols (Spanish Pioneers).

    Légion Portugais – created 16 January 1808 and organised from troops of the disbanded Portuguese Army. The 18 May 1808 decree set out the Légion Portugais organisation – two brigades of infantry and cavalry, composed of six regiments of light infantry (reduced to 5 by combat and desertion), two regiments of Chasseurs à Cheval and 1 company of artillery (whose existence was short-lived). Each infantry regiment was have two battalions, each battalion 6 companies and each company 140 personnel. Each cavalry regiment was to be composed of four squadrons of two companies and each company of 120 men. The decree also set up a depot battalion for the infantry and a squadron to act as depot for the cavalry – the depots were organized as for the others.
    In 1809 a half-brigade of 20 elite companies was organised.
    On 2 May 1811 the Légion was reduced to 3 regiments of infantry, each of 2 battalions of 6 companies, of 140 men each and a depot battalion of 4 companies of 140 men each, and 1 Chasseur à Cheval regiment of 4 squadrons of 2 companies of 120 men each.
    On 18 January 1813 the remaining troops were reorganized into a battalion de guerre and a depot battalion. The Legion was disbanded in November 1813.

    Régiments Provinciaux Croates – 6 regiments raised in November & December 1809:
    1st (Licca); 2nd (Ottochatz); 3rd (Ogulin); 4th Szluin); 5th (1st Banat); & 6th (2nd Banat);

    Hussards Croates – raised on 23 February 1813 and disbanded 25 November.

    Régiments Provisoires d’Infanterie Croate – 4 regiments were raised in 1809 from former Austrian Grenz Infanterie Regiments, reverted to Austrian service in 1813. 1st raised from Liccaner & Ottocaner; 2nd from Oguliner & Szluiner; 3rd from first battalions of the 1st & 2nd Banal; 4th raised end of August 1812 from the second battalions of 1st & 2nd Banal.

    Régiment Catalonien – decree of 17 March 1812 called for 3 battalions from Spanish Prisoners of War in Catalonia. Never reached planned strength & disbanded on 12 July 1812.

    Chasseurs des Alpes formed in 1813 in preparation for an Austrian offensive in Italy and for fighting the Piedmontese Barbets. It had 1-2 battalions formed of former smugglers, poachers, gamekeepers and ordinary mountaineers.

    Chasseurs de Montagne on 6 August 1808 Napoleon decided to form 8 Pyrenean battalions of "miquelets" (comprising 34 companies in total) utilising the National Guard from the Departments of l’Ariège, Basses-Pyrénèes, Haute-Garonne, Hautes- Pyrénèes, and Pyrénèes -Orientales. The battalions were to be named:
    1er bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département de l'Ariège;
    2e bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département de l'Ariège;
    bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département de la Haute-Garonne;
    bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département des Basses-Pyrénées;
    1er bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département des Basses-Pyrénées;
    2e bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département des Basses-Pyrénées;
    bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département des Hautes-Pyrénées;
    &
    bataillon des chasseurs de la montagne du département des Pyrénées –Orientales.

    But due to the lack of personnel by1811 the chasseurs were reorganised into just 3 battalions of Chasseurs de Montagne: 1er bataillon from 3 companies from Hautes-Pyrénées, 2 companies from Haute-Garonne, & 1 from Pyrénées–Orientales; 2e bataillon from 8 companies from l’Ariège; and 3e bataillon from Basses-Pyrénées. After the evacuation of Spain, the battalions were incorporated into the infantry: 1er bataillon into 116th regiment de ligne; 2e bataillon into 4th regiment legere; and 3e bataillon into 25th regiment legere.

    Colonial Troops

    Légion du Cap – formed in 1805 with strength of 2 battalions from remnants of several French regiments. Disbanded in 1809.

    Régiment de l’Ile de France – raised on 9 November 1804 with 2 battalions of 7 companies each. Became 20th Légere in 1811.

    Troupes de Java – in 1810 mix of forces (Dutch, Wurttemberg & French) reorganised into 3 line infantry regiments, a regiment of chasseurs of 2 battalions, a cavalry regiment, 3 battalions of garrison infantry and an artillery regiment of 3 battalions. Destroyed by Anglo-Indian force in 1811.

    Bataillon du Sénegal – raised in 1799 with 3 companies; renamed “Compagnie Auxiliaires” in 1802. Capitulated to British in 1809.

    Bataillon de la Guyane - ?? surrendered to Anglo-Portuguese force on 14 January 1809.

    Chasseurs de la Réunion – 1 battalion formed on 2 November 1803 from white citizens of Mauritius and La Réunion. In 1804 an artillery company was added. 3 companies of sepoys were raised on 4 October 1811. Surrendered to the British in May 1811.

    Bataillons Coloniaux – 4 battalions of 6 companies (1 grenadier, 1 voltigeur and 4 fusilier) formed on 16 August 1803 to act as the European depots for colonial forces. Reorganised in July 1810 into 4 company battalions.

    Pionniers Coloniaux – 6 battalions formed on 20 August 1812 and attached to various colonial regiments. Assigned as follows: 1st battalion (Holland); 2nd (Corsica); 3rd (Île d’Oleron); 4th (Belle-Île); 5th ( ..); 6th (..).

    Chasseurs Volontaires de la Martinique – 1 company raised 8 July 1803.

    Corps de Pionniers Noirs – raised on 6 March 1804 on Martinique from black slaves to serve the artillery and engineers.

    Chasseurs de la Guadeloupe – 4 companies raised in 1802. Reduced to 1 company in September 1807, increased to 400 men in 1810.
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; February 14, 2011 at 03:32 PM. Reason: Régiments Suisse, addition of company strengths for 1805
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  2. #2
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Unit Names

    Line Cavalry

    Carabiniers
    There were two regiments:
    1er Régiment de Carabiniers
    2ème Régiment de Carabiniers

    The strength and organisational changes to the Cuirassiers applied equally to the Carabiniers. The Carabiniers were authorised to wear cuirasses on 24 December 1809.

    Cuirassiers
    The decree of 24 September 1803 authorised the first 12 cavalry regiments to wear the cuirass and take the title … Régiment de Cuirassiers; the remaining cavalry regiments became the 22nd to 27th Dragoons. In 1803 the theoretical peacetime strength of each regiment was 657 men which would be increased to 706 in times of war.

    Each Cuirassier regiment had 4 squadrons of 2 companies. Unlike other line cavalry units the Cuirassiers and Carabiniers were not permitted to form elite companies as all of the units were considered elite.

    The decree of 31 August 1806 authorised a change to strengths – Regimental headquarters 20 men; each company 107 men.

    The decree of 10 March 1807 authorised each regiment to raise a 5th squadron. Regimental headquarters of 20 men and 104 men in each company.

    Two Provisional (1st & 2nd Provisoire) regiments were created in November 1807 and sent to Spain. The 13th Cuirassiers was formed at the end of 1808 from the 1st Régiment Provisoire (the 2nd Regiment was involved in the capitulation at Bailen). All Regiments bar the 13th were reduced to 4 squadrons from 18 January 1810.

    A 3rd Provisional (3rd Provisoire) Regiment was formed in January 1808 and disbanded in 1810.


    The Provisional Regiments were drawn from the following units:
    • 1st Provisoire Regiment (detachments from 1st & 2nd Carabiniers, 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cuirassiers);
    • 2nd Provisoire Regiment (detachments from 5th, 9th, 10th, 11th & 12th Cuirassiers);
    • 3rd Provisoire Regiment (detachments from 4th, 6th, 7th & 8th Cuirassiers).
    The 14th Cuirassiers were formed from the Dutch 2nd Cuirassiers in 1810.

    On 10 January 1812 Cuirassier regiments were authorised to form a 5th squadron.

    Dragons (Dragoons)

    There were 21 Dragoon regiments (Régiment de Dragons) at the start of 1803. In September this increased to 30 Regiments when a number of cavalry and Hussar regiments were converted. In general each regiment had 4 squadrons of 2 companies of 100 men each, with the senior company in the 1st squadron elite. Theoretical regimental strength was 906 men – headquarters 18 men; each company comprised 70 mounted and 41 dismounted personnel; strength would be increased to 1,138 personnel in times of war.

    In 1805 there were 4 temporary foot Dragoon Regiments :
    1st regiment from 1st, 2nd, 4th, 14th, 20th & 26th;
    2nd Regiment from 3rd, 6th, 10th, 11th, 13th & 22nd;
    3rd Regiment from 5th, 8th, 9th, 12th, 16th & 21st;
    4th Regiment from 15th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 25th & 27th.

    In 1806 there were 2 temporary foot Dragoon regiments:
    1st Regiment from 2nd, 6th, 11th, 13th, 14th, 20th, 22nd & 26th;
    2nd Regiment 8th, 12th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 25th & 27th.

    Decree of 10 March 1807 called for a Dragoon regiment to field 1,044 men – headquarters 20 men, company of 128 men. 8 sappers added to each regiment in 1808.
    Decree of 24 December 1809 called for regimental strength to reach 1,500 men (in 5 squadrons?). The decree of 18 June 1811 converted six Dragoon Regiments – 1st, 3rd, 8th, 9th, 10th & 29th – into six Chevau-léger-lanciers, numbered 1st to 6th.In June 1811 the remaining 24 regiments had 4 or 5 squadrons. Decree of 10 January 1812 instructed the 4 Dragoon regiments going into Russia to recruit a 5th squadron.

    In January 1808 two Provisional regiments were part of the Army of Spain:
    1st Provisional Dragoon Regiment (1 company from 11th, 13th, 14th, 18th, 19th & 22nd Dragoon Regiment)
    2nd Provisional Dragoon Regiment (1 company from 8th, 12th, 20th, 21st, 25th & 26th Dragoon Regiment)

    Hussards (Hussars)

    At September 1803 there remained 10 Régiments de Hussards as 3 were converted to 28th to 30th Dragoons. Hussar regiments generally consisted of 4 squadrons of 2 companies with the senior company of the first squadron designated elite. In December 1803 theoretical regimental strength was 852 men: 20 men in headquarters; 104 men in each company. The decree of 10 March 1807 required every Hussar regiment to increase its theoretical strength to 1,043 men (headquarters 19 men; 128 men per company). The decree of 10 January 1812 instructed the Hussar regiments going into Russia to recruit a 5th squadron resulting in a theoretical strength of 1,310 men (headquarters 20 men; 129 men per company).

    In July 1810 the 2nd Regiment of Dutch Hussars became the 11th Regiment of Hussars.
    The 9th bis formed in Spain on 19 January 1812 became the 12th Hussars in February 1813.
    The 13th & 14th regiments formed in January 1813 were destroyed or captured in the campaign in Saxony – their survivors were reorganised as the 14th Hussars on 1 February 1814.
    The Westphalian Hussar Regiment Jérôme Napoleon became the 13th Hussars on 1 January 1814.

    In January 1808 two Provisional regiments were part of the Army of Spain:
    1st Provisional Hussar Regiment (1 company from 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 5th Hussar Regiments)
    2nd Provisional Hussar Regiment (1 company from 7th, 8th, 9th & 10th Hussar Regiments)

    Chasseurs à Cheval

    There were 26 regiments of Chasseurs à Cheval (Régiment de Chasseurs à Cheval) in 1803 (not numbered sequentially as 17th and 18th were vacant). Regiments generally consisted of 4 squadrons of 2 companies with the senior company of the 1st squadron designated elite.

    In 1803 theoretical regimental strength was during peacetime 812 personnel, increased to 935 personnel at times of war.
    The decree of 10 March 1807 required every Chasseurs à Cheval regiment to increase its theoretical strength to 1,043 men (headquarters 19 men; 128 men per company).

    27th and 28th Regiments were formed on 29 May 1808. The former from the Chevau-légers belges du duc d’Aremberg, the latter from the Tuscan Dragoons.
    29th Regiment was formed in August 1809 from the 3rd Provisional Regiment of Chasseurs à Cheval in Spain.
    30th Regiment was formed in December 1810 and became 9th Chevau-Léger-Lanciers on 18 June 1811.
    31st Regiment was created in 1811.
    In June 1811 one regiment had 8 squadrons; seventeen regiments had 5 squadrons and ten regiments had 4 squadrons.

    The decree of 10 January 1812 instructed the Chasseur à Cheval regiments going into Russia to recruit a 5th squadron.


    In January 1808 six Provisional regiments were part of the Army of Spain:
    1st Provisional Chasseur à Cheval Regiment (1 company from 1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th & 11th Chasseur à Cheval Regiment)
    2nd Provisional Chasseur à Cheval Regiment (1 company from 12th, 13th & 16th Chasseur à Cheval Regiment)
    (I haven't been able to track down composition of the other regiments)


    Chevauléger Lanciers (Light Horse Lancers)

    The decree of 18 June 1811 converted six Dragoon Regiments – 1st, 3rd, 8th, 9th, 10th & 29th – into six Chevau-léger-lanciers, numbered 1st to 6th.
    The same decree transferred the two Régiment des lanciers de la Légion de la Vistule into French service and they became the 7th and 8th Chevau-Léger-Lanciers. On the same date the 30th Regiment de Chasseurs à Cheval became 9th Chevau-Léger-Lanciers.

    All regiments had 4 squadrons of 2 companies; with the senior company of the 1st squadron designated elite.

    Provisional Cavalry Regiments
    Apart from those mentioned above the Army of Spain in June 1808 had at least 6 regiments:

    1st Provisional Cavalry Regiment (4/26th Chasseur a Cheval Regiment)
    2nd Provisional Cavalry Regiment (4/1st & 4/3rd Dragoon Regiment)
    3rd Provisional Cavalry Regiment (4/4th & 4/5th Dragoon Regiment)
    4th Provisional Cavalry Regiment (4/9th & 4/15th Dragoon Regiment)
    (have been unable to find breakdown of the others).
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; January 17, 2011 at 08:28 AM. Reason: insertion of line cavalry, formatting, completion; addition of provisional cavalry regiments
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  3. #3
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Unit Names

    Line Artillery

    Artillerie à Cheval de Ligne
    6 Régiments Artillerie à Cheval de Ligne of 6 companies each from 1804 (except 6th which had 7 companies). A full strength company had 6 pieces - usually 4 cannon & 2 howitzers; pieces were paired into squadrons.Depot company added to each regiment in 1807.
    Although a 7th regiment was decreed in 1810 it was not sustained. (Formed with 2 companies from the Dutch light artillery which were absorbed by the 1st and 4th Regiments.)
    6th Regiment ended up with 8 companies.
    Decree of 18 October 1811 authorised each company to consist of 100 men.
    On 1 August 1813 each regiment was to be augmented by 2 companies, only the 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 5th received 1 company each.


    Artillerie à Pied de Ligne
    8 Régiments Artillerie à Pied de Ligne of 22 companies each in 1804. A full strength company consisted of 8 pieces - usually 6 cannon & 2 howitzers.
    Decree of 9 April 1807 authorised each company to consist of 120 men.
    Decree 16 March 1809 ordered all regiments to form a depot company.
    9th regiment added in August 1810.
    In 1813 Regiments had 28 companies.

    Artillerie de la Marine
    On 5 May 1803 there were 12 battalions in 4 Regiments “Régiments de Artillerie de Marine” (1st & 2nd had 4 battalions; 3rd & 4th had 2 battalions). The battalions comprised 6 companies of 150 men (increased to 200 men in times of war). Regimental headquarters for 1st & 2nd Regiments 26 men; for 3rd & 4th 24 men. On 9 November 1804 renamed “Corps Impériale de l’Artillerie de la Marine”. The 2nd gained a 5th battalion in 1805.
    On 29 February 1812 company strength was increased to 250 men.
    The Regiments transferred from the Ministry of the Navy to the Ministry of War on 24 January 1813 and were reorganised into battalions of 6 companies of 140 men each. 6 battalions remained in the ports and 20 were to join Napoleon in Germany to serve in an infantry role in Marmont’s VI Corps. Although planned establishment was 1st Regiment (8 battalions); 2nd Regiment (10 battalions); 3rd & 4th Regiments (4 battalions) with some battalions to be filled out with new conscripts regimental commanders preferred to keep their battalions strong – so in practice deployment was 1st Regiment (5 battalions); 2nd Regiment (6 battalions); 3rd & 4th Regiments (3 battalions).
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 13, 2010 at 01:53 AM. Reason: Insertion of entry on Line Artillery, correction to horse arty & addition of Marine Artillery
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  4. #4
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Unit Names

    Gendarmerie Impériale

    In 1801 the Gendarmerie Nationale comprised 26 Légions, composed of 1,750 mounted brigades and 750 foot brigades. Each brigade was composed of a NCO and 5 gendarmes.
    In 1804 the Gendarmerie Nationale was renamed Gendarmerie Impériale. In 1805 there were 27 Légions. Each had 2 squadrons (numbered consecutively) of 2 companies each. The number of brigades per company varied according to the topography and population of the area.

    1st – Paris
    2nd – Caen
    3rd – Alençon
    4th – Rennes
    5th - Angers
    6th - Tours
    7th – Bordeaux
    8th – Périgeaux
    9th – Auch
    10th – Carcassonne
    11th – Rodez
    12th – Lyon
    13th – Nevers
    14th – Troyes
    15th – Arras
    16th – Bruxelles
    17th – Liège
    18th – Metz
    19th – Nancy
    20th – Besançon
    21st – Dijon
    22nd – Grenoble
    23rd – Brignolles
    24th – Avignon
    25th – Mayence
    26th – Bastia
    27th – Turin

    The Gendarmerie Impériale increased as the Empire expanded:
    28th (Gênes, Appenins) formed 6 June 1805;
    29th (Taro, Arno) formed 24 May 1808;
    30th (Rome, Trasimene) formed 17 February 1810;
    31st (Illyrie) formed in 1810;
    32nd & 33rd formed 18 October 1810;
    34th formed 4 July 1811.

    In 1810 the squadron was abolished and a Légion could consist of 2 to 6 companies. By 1811 there were 144 companies.

    There were also 6 special Légions charged with looking after the naval bases.

    Gendarmerie d’Espagne

    24 November 1809 decreed that 20 squadrons, each of 200 men (of whom 80 were to be mounted) should be organised for service in Spain. They were formed by February 1810. A separate “La Légion de Catalogne” was organised for Catalonia. At the end of 1810 a couple of squadrons of mounted gendarmerie were trained to use lances; they took the name “Gendarmes Chevauléger” or “Lanciers-Gendarmes”.
    The 12 December 1811 decree converted the squadrons into 6 Légions de Gendarmerie d’Espagne. They were based:

    1st – Burgos
    2nd – Saragosse
    3rd – Pampelune
    4th – Vitoria
    5th - Burgos
    6th - Figuières

    Municipal Guards

    Garde de Paris – two 2 battalion (each of 5 companies of 106 men each) infantry regiments and a squadron of dragoons of 2 companies (each of 86 men) were created on 4 October 1802 to act as Garde Municipale de Paris. Headquarters of 19 personnel. On 18 May 1806 it was militarised and renamed Garde de Paris; infantry battalions were increased to 6 companies (1 grenadier, 1 voltigeur and 4 fusilier) and the headquarters increased to 29 personnel. In 1812 the infantry was reduced to a single 2 battalion regiment and on 6 January 1813 it was converted to 134th Régiment d’Infanterie de Ligne. The Dragoons became part of the 2nd Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde on 30 December 1812.

    Compagnies de réserve

    Created in 1804 and attached to the Gendarmerie to guard town halls, government archives and prisons. Each company was called “Compagnie de réserve du départment (insert name of départment)”. Initially there were 107 companies (divided into 6 classes according to the importance of the department) assigned 1 per départment except Seine which had 2.
    Company strength varied - 1st class 210 men, 2nd class 160 men, 3rd class 120 men, 4th class 100 men, 5th class 60 men and 6th class 36 men. In general 4 companies would be grouped to form a Légion.

    The Légions were formed as follows (class number in brackets):

    1st – Seine (3rd); Seine-et-Oise (3rd); Seine-et-Marne (5th); Oise (5th).
    2nd –Seine-Inférieure (1st); Eure (5th); Calvados (3rd); Manche (4th).
    3rd – Orne (5th); Eure-et-Loire (5th); Mayenne (5th); Sarthe (5th).
    4th – Côtes du Nord (5th); Ille-et-Vilaine (4th); Finistère (5th); Morbihan (5th).
    5th - Loire-Inférieure (2nd); Maine-et-Loire (4th); Vendée (5th); Deux-Sèvres (5th).
    6th - Loir-et-Cher (5th); Indre-et-Loire (4th); Indre (6th); Vienne (5th).
    7th – Charente (5th); Charente-Inférieure (5th); Gironde (1st); Landes (6th).
    8th – Lot-et-Garonne (5th); Dordogne (5th); Haute-Vienne (5th); Corrèze (5th).
    9th – Haute-Garonne (2nd); Gers (5th); Hautes-Pyrénées (6th); Basses-Pyrénées (5th).
    10th – Tarn (5th); Aude (5th); Ariège (6th); Pyrénées-Orient (5th).
    11th – Cantal (5th); Lozère (6th); Aveyron (5th); Lot (5th).
    12th – Puy-de-Dôme (3rd); Haute-Loire (5th); Loire (6th); Rhône (1st).
    13th – Creuse (6th); Allier (5th); Cher (5th); Nièvre (5th).
    14th – Loiret (3rd); Yonne (5th); Aube (5th); Marne (5th).
    15th – Nord (2nd); Pas-de-Calais (3rd); Aisne (5th); Somme (3rd).
    16th – Lys (4th); Escaut (2nd); Jemmape (4th); Dyle (2nd).
    17th – Deux-Nèthes (2nd); Meuse-Inférieure (5th); Ourte (3rd); Sambre-et-Meuse (5th).
    18th – Fôrets (6th); Ardennes (5th); Meuse (5th); Moselle (4th).
    19th – Vosges (6th); Meurthe (4th); Haut-Rhin (5th); Bas-Rhin (3rd).
    20th – Doubs (4th); Haute-Saone (5th); Jura (5th); Léman (4th).
    21st – Côte-d'Or (3rd); Haute-Marne (6th); Ain (6th); Saone-et-Loire (3rd).
    22nd – Isère (5th); Mont-Blanc (5th); Ardèche (6th); Drôme (5th).
    23rd – Hautes-Alpes (6th); Basses-Alpes (6th); Alpes-Maritimes (5th); Var (5th).
    24th – Bouches-du-Rhône (1st); Vaucluse (5th); Gard (3rd); Herault (5th).
    25th – Rhin-et-Moselle (5th); Roer (2nd); Sarre (5th); Mont-Tonnerre (4th).
    26th – Golo (5th); Liamone (5th).
    27th – Pô (1st); Stura (5th); Marengo (5th); Tanaro (4th); Sesia (5th); Doire (5th).

    As the Empire grew so did the number of Legions:
    28th formed 6 June 1805– Montenotte; Appenins; Gênes.
    29th formed 24 May 1808 – Taro; Arno-Méditerranée; Ombrone.
    30th formed 17 february 1810 – Rome (2 companies); Trasimène.
    31st never really organised – Carniole; Carinthie; Istrie; Croatie civile; Dalmatie; Raguse.
    32nd formed 18 October 1810 – Zuyderzée; Bouches-de-la-Meuse; Yssel-Supérieur.
    33rd formed 18 October 1810 - Bouches-de-l’Yssel; Frise; Ems-Occident; Ems-Orient.
    34th formed 4 July 1811 - Ems-Supérieur; Bouches-de-Weser; Bouches-de-l’Elbe. (note Ems-Orient wastransferred to 34th Legion in 1811).

    Napoleon saw the reserve companies as a reservoir of troops for the army. For example – in late 1806 he drew on the reserve companies to form the Regiment of the Fusiliers of the Guard; 1,600 men went to the legions of reserve in January 1808 etc.

    Garde Nationale (National Guard)

    Adapted from Paddy Griffith “The Art of War of Revolutionary France 1789-1802”, John R. Elting “Swords around a Throne”, George Nafziger “Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia”, Scott Bowden “Napoleon’s Grande Armée of 1813”, Camille Rousset “La Grande Armée de 1813” & E de Labédollière “Histoire de la Garde Nationale récit complet de tous les faits qui l’ont distinguee depuis son origine jusqu’en 1848”

    The Garde Nationale started in 1789 as a voluntary unpaid bourgeois militia (or ‘neighborhood watch’) in every town, for local duties only; ages eligible 18-60. They were raised to replace the Milice (conscripted Provincial militia which was disbanded early in the revolution). It was largely disbanded after many of the Paris units attempted a counter-revolution in 1795.

    In 1805 Napoleon reorganised the Garde Nationale into Cohortes (Cohorts) - the equivalent of a battalion. Each cohort comprised 10 companies (1 grenadier, 1 chasseur & 8 fusilier – note Elting & Labédollière clearly say chasseur & not voltigeur company). Four Cohortes were grouped together into a Legion – the equivalent of a regiment. The grenadier & chasseur companies were made up of retired veterans or bon bourgeoisie who wereable to provide their own uniforms.

    The only National Guard Legions activated at the start of the Imperial regime were those from the Départments du Nord, de la Somme, du Pas-de-Calais and de Lys. They totalled 33 Légions. The Légion du Quesnoy had only 3 Cohortes. The Legions were numbered as follows (page 305 Labédollière):

    Départment du Nord:
    1re Legion Lille
    2e Turcoing
    3e Douai
    4e Dunkerque
    5e Bergues
    6e Cambray
    7e le Quesnoy
    8e Hazebrouck
    9e Séclin
    10e Avesnes
    11e Armentieres
    12e Saint-Amand
    13e le cateau
    14e Valenciennes

    Départment du Pas-de-Calais
    1re Arras
    2e Béthune
    3e Boulogne
    4e Saint-Omer
    5e Montreuil
    6e Aire
    7e Bapeaume
    8e Saint-Pol

    Départment de la Somme
    1re Amiens
    2e Abbeville
    3e Péronne
    4e Mondidier
    5e Douliens
    6e Molliens-le-Vidane

    Départment de Lys
    1re Bruges
    2e Bruges
    3e Ypres

    (Elting says they were identified by the name of the department from which they were came. If the department provided more than one legion, they were numbered, e.g. 1st Légion du Nord etc. – but Labédollière has them clearly numbered & identified by town).

    During 1805-07 the grenadier & chasseur companies were mobilised into provisional “elite battalions” for frontier & coastal security. The national guards of Antwerp, Boulogne, Besançon, Lille, Mayence (Mainz), Rouen, Strasbourg, & other major places along the Rhine and English Channel were put on a war footing, ready to reinforce or replace the local garrisons.

    In March 1812, in preparation for his invasion of Russia, Napoleon completely remodelled the Garde Nationale. It was supposed to contain all able-bodied civilians, divided into 3 bans according to age:

    · the first comprised men between the ages of 20 and 26 who had not served in the army. They were expected to provide 100 cohorts immediately for active duty within France as frontier guards, interior police (including the enforcement of conscription), and garrisons for the depots, arsenals and fortresses. Only 88 cohorts were actually mobilised. Each cohort comprised of 6 companies of infantry, 1 artillery company & 1 depot company.

    · the second ban comprised men between the ages of 26 and 40;

    · the third ban comprised men between the ages of 40 and 60.

    Each Cohorte was supposed to have 1,080 men but average strength was 850 men.

    128 of the 130 Départments provided troops to the Cohortes – only Corsica & Simplon did not. The 88 Cohortes were formed from the following:

    1re Cohorte Seine
    2e Cohorte Rome; Trasimène
    3e Cohorte Zuyderzée
    4e Cohorte Rhône; Loire
    5e Cohorte Gironde
    6e Cohorte Bouches-du-Rhône
    7e Cohorte Bouches-de-l’Elbe, Bouches-du-Weser; Ems-Supérieur
    8e Cohorte Aisne
    9e Cohorte Eure-et-Loir; & Loiret
    10e Cohorte Oise
    11e Cohorte Seine-et-Marne
    12e Cohorte Seine-et-Oise
    13e Cohorte Ardennes; Marne
    14e Cohorte Marne; Meuse
    15e Cohorte Forêts; Moselle
    16e Cohorte Meurthe
    17e Cohorte Vosges
    18e Cohorte Bas-Rhin
    19e Cohorte Haut-Rhin
    20e Cohorte Ain; Doubs
    21e Cohorte Jura
    22e Cohorte Haute-Saône
    23e Cohorte Isère
    24e Cohorte Haute-Alpes; Drôme
    25e Cohorte Léman; Mont-Blanc
    26e Cohorte Basses-Alpes; Alpes-Maritimes; Vaucluse
    27e Cohorte Var
    28e Cohorte Hérault
    29e Cohorte Aveyron
    30e Cohorte Ardèche; Lozère
    31e Cohorte Gard; Tarn
    32e Cohorte Haute-Garonne
    33e Cohorte Ariége; Haute-Pyrénées
    34e Cohorte Gers; Tarn-et-Garonne
    35e Cohorte Aude; Pyrénées-Orientales
    36e Cohorte Landes; Basses-Pyrénées
    37e Cohorte Charente-Inférieure; Vendée
    38e Cohorte Loire-Inférieure
    39e Cohorte Deux-Sèvres; Vienne
    40e Cohorte Finistère
    41e Cohorte Côtes-du-Nord
    42e Cohorte Ille-et-Vilaine
    43e Cohorte Morbihan
    44e Cohorte Calvados
    45e Cohorte Manche
    46e Cohorte Orne
    47e Cohorte Seine-Inférieure
    48e Cohorte Eure
    49e Cohorte Somme
    50e Cohorte Nord
    51e Cohorte Nord
    52e Cohorte Lys
    53e Cohorte Pas-de-Calais
    54e Cohorte Pas-de-Calais
    55e Cohorte Côte-d’Or
    56e Cohorte Aube; Haute-Marne
    57e Cohorte Saône-et-Loire
    58e Cohorte Yonne
    59e Cohorte Cantal; Haute-Loire
    60e Cohorte Puy-de-Dôme
    61e Cohorte Charente; Dordogne
    62e Cohorte Corrèze; Dordogne
    63e Cohorte Lot-et-Garonne; Lot
    64e Cohorte Cher; Nièvre
    65e Cohorte Allier; Creuse
    66e Cohorte Indre; Haute-Vienne
    67e Cohorte Indre-et-Loire; Loir-et-Cher
    68e Cohorte Maine-et-Loire
    69e Cohorte Mayenne
    70e Cohorte Sarthe
    71e Cohorte Dyle; Bouches-de-l’Escaut
    72e Cohorte Escaut
    73e Cohorte Escaut; Jemmapes
    74e Cohorte Jemmapes
    75e Cohorte Deux-Nèthes
    76e Cohorte Meuse-Inférieure; Lippe; Bouches-de-Rhin
    77e Cohorte Roër
    78e Cohorte Ourte; Sambre-et-Meuse
    79e Cohorte Mont-Tonnerre
    80e Cohorte Rhin-et-Moselle
    81e Cohorte Sarre
    82e Cohorte Doire; Pô; Sesia
    83e Cohorte Marengo; Stura
    84e Cohorte Appenins; Taro
    85e Cohorte Gènes; Montenotte
    86e Cohorte Arno; Ombrone; Méditerranée
    87e Cohorte Ems-Oriental; Ems-Occidental; Bouches-de-l’Issel; Frise
    88e Cohorte Bouches-de-la-Meuse; Issel- Supérieur

    The 88 Cohortes of the first ban were used to help rebuild Napoleon’s army in 1813. They were converted into twenty-two 4 battalion line infantry regiments (135th to 156th) – each of 6 companies. The depot companies of the cohorts were combined to form 4 company depot battalions for the regiments. One artillery company was retained per regiment and the remainder were used to help reconstitute 3 artillery regiments.

    37 “Urban” cohorts were formed for garrison duty, and small “elite” legions were formed for service in the field.

    Before the campaign for France, Napoleon ordered the formation of 2 reserve armies composed of Cohortes de gardes nationals – one at Soissons, Meaux, Nogent, Troyes & Lyons; the other at Toulouse & Bordeaux. He also re-established a garde nationale de Paris composed of 1 Légion of 4 battalions per arrondissement (there appear to have been 12 Légions but the information is not totally clear), each battalion comprised 5 companies (1 grenadier & 4 fusilier). The 4 grenadier companies of each Légion formed an elite battalion, with the name “bataillon d’elite de ….. Légion”.
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; August 25, 2011 at 12:52 PM. Reason: garde nationale expansion
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  5. #5
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Unit Names

    Imperial Guard (Garde Impériale)

    Infantry

    Divided into 2 Branches – grenadiers and Chasseurs.

    Vieille Garde (Old Guard): 1st regiments of Grenadiers & Chasseurs à Pied; NCOs upwards of 2nd rgts of Grenadiers & Chasseurs à Pied; Marins de la Garde; Battalions of Velites; Captains upwards of Tirailleurs, Voltigeurs, Flanqueurs, & National Garde regiments;

    Moyenne Garde (Middle Guard): 3rd Grenadiers à Pied; Corporals & below of 2nd Grenadiers & Chasseurs à Pied; Fusilier-Grenadiers & Fusilier-Chasseurs; Velites of Turin & Florence;

    Jeune Garde (Young Guard): Tirailleurs, Voltigeurs, Flanqueurs; National Garde de la Garde; Pupilles;

    Grenadiers

    Grenadiers à Pied – from 29 July 1804 1 regiment “Régiment de Grenadiers à Pied de la Garde Impériale” of 2 battalions of 8 companies each and a battalion of velites of 5 companies. Regimental headquarters comprised 83 personnel (this includes the Grenadier band of 48 personnel), a grenadier company comprised 108 personnel, a velites company 190 personnel. From 15 April 1806 there were 2 regiments of 2 battalions each plus battalion of velites attached to each regiment. On 1 October 1808 reduced to 1 regiment of 2 battalions of 4 companies each. 13 September 1810 the Regiment Grenadiers Hollandais became the 2nd Regiment des Grenadiers Hollandais de la Garde. 18 May 1811 a new 2nd regiment was formed resulting in the Grenadiers Hollandais becoming the 3rd.

    Fusiliers-Grenadiers – created by decree 15 December 1806 with 2 battalions of 4 companies each. Total strength 1,800 men. Battalions increased to 5 companies in January 1811, and to 6 companies 26 December 1813.

    Tirailleurs- Grenadiers – 1st regiment formed 16 January 1809 2nd regiment formed 25 April 1809. Became respectively 1st and 2nd Tirailleurs on 30 December 1810.

    Conscrit-Grenadiers – 1st regiment formed on 29 March 1809, 2nd regiment formed on 31 March. Battalions with 6 companies. Became respectively 3rd and 4th Tirailleurs on 10 February 1811.

    Tirailleurs – 1st & 2nd regiments formed from the Tirailleurs-Grenadiers on 30 December 1810. 3rd bis, 4th bis & 5th bis raised from Pupilles on 17 January 1813 and disbanded in March 1813. 6th bis raised on 17 January 1813 and disbanded in March 1813. 3rd & 4th regiments formed from the Conscrit-Grenadiers on 10 February 1811. 5th formed on 11 March 1811; 6th raised on 26 August 1811; 7th formed on 17 January 1813 from the Pupilles; 8th formed on 23 March 1813; 9th to 13th formed on 6 April 1813; 14th to 16th formed on 11 January 1814. 17th to 19th formed on 21 January 1814.

    Flanqueur-Grenadiers – created 4 December 1811 with 2 battalions.

    Chasseurs

    Chasseurs à Pied - from 29 July 1804 1 regiment “Régiment de Chasseurs à Pied de la Garde Impériale” of 2 battalions and a battalion of velites. 15 April 1806 2 regiments of 2 battalions plus battalion of velites attached to each regiment. Reduced to 1 regiment of 2 battalions of 4 companies each on 1 October 1808

    Fusiliers-Chasseurs – created 19 October 1806 with 2 battalions of 4 companies each. Battalions increased to 5 companies in January 1811, and to 6 companies 26 December 1813.

    Tirailleurs-Chasseurs – 1st regiment formed on 29 March 1809, 2nd regiment formed on 25 April 1809. Became respectively 1st and 2nd Voltigeurs on 30 December 1810.

    Conscrit-Chasseurs - 1st and 2nd regiments formed on 31 March 1809. Battalions with 6 companies. Became respectively 3rd and 4th Voltigeurs on 10 February 1811.

    Voltigeurs - 1st & 2nd regiments formed from the Tirailleurs-Chasseurs on 30 December 1810. 3rd bis raised from Pupilles on 17 January 1813 and disbanded in March 1813. 4th bis, 5th bis & 6th bis raised on 17 January 1813 and disbanded in March 1813.3rd & 4th regiments formed from the Conscrit- Chasseurs on 10 February 1811. 5th formed on 18 March 1811; 6th raised on 26 August 1811; 7th formed on 13 February 1813 from the National Garde de la Garde; 8th formed on 23 March 1813; 9th to 13th formed on 6 April 1813; 14th to 16th formed on 11 January 1814. 17th to 19th formed on 21 January 1814.

    Flanqueur-Chasseurs – formed September 1811 with 2 battalions.

    Other

    Marins de la Garde – formed 17 September 1803 with total strength of 742 men in 5 crews (companies). In August 1804 battalion strength increased to 818 organised into a headquarters, 5 crews & a depot. Battalion was destroyed at Bailen in 1808. 27 March 1809 reorganised into 5 squads of 148 men. 16 September 1809 strength increased by 3 squads and a headquarters. The squads became companies. Total strength 1,136 men.

    Velites de Turin – battalion created March 1809 attached to corps of Grenadiers; 4 companies of 125 men; disbanded February 1814;

    Velites de Florence – battalion created March 1809 attached to corps of Chasseurs; 4 companies of 125 men; disbanded February 1814;

    National Garde – created 1 January 1810 with 4 battalions of 4 companies. On 29 May 1810 reduced to 2 battalions of 6 companies. On 15 February 1813 became 7th Voltigeurs.

    Pupilles –formed from former Dutch velites and admitted to the Guard 30 March 1811. Initially a regiment with 2 battalions of 6 companies each, rising to 9 battalions of 4 companies each. In 1813 strength reduced to 4 battalions as the others used to create regiments of Tirailleurs & Voltigeurs.

    Cavalry

    Vieille Garde (Old Guard): Cavalrymen upwards of the Grenadiers a Cheval. Chasseurs a Cheval, Dragons de l’Impératice, 1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers, & Mamelouks.

    Moyen Garde (Middle Guard): Cavalrymen and NCOs of 2nd Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers.

    Jeune Garde (Young Guard): additional squadrons created in 1813 to the Old Guard regiments.


    Grenadiers à Cheval – When the decree of 18 May 1804 changed the Consular Guard to the Imperial Guard the regiment took the name “Régiment de Grenadiers à Cheval de la Garde Impériale”. Had headquarters and 4 squadrons with two companies each. Strength of headquarters 31 personnel; 118 personnel per company. Decree of 15 April 1806 added a squadron of Velites and headquarters strength was increased to 37 personnel. On 1 August 1811 the velites were disbanded and regimental strength increased to 5 squadrons of 250 men each. In 1813 the regiment comprised 4 Old Guard squadrons of 2 companies each and 2 Young Guard squadrons of two companies each.

    Chasseurs à Cheval – When the decree of 18 May 1804 changed the Consular Guard to the Imperial Guard the regiment took the name “Régiment de Chasseurs à Cheval de la Garde Impériale”. 4 squadrons with two companies of 108 men each. The Mamlouks were attached to the regiment. On 17 September 1805 a squadron of 4 companies of velites was attached; on 15 April 1806 the velites were split into 2 squadrons of 2 companies. In December 1809 the Velites were reorganised into a single squadron of 2 companies. On 1 August 1811 strength increased to 5 squadrons of 250 men each and the Velites were disbanded. The decree of 18 January 1813 called for 8 squadrons with 2 companies each; the first 5 were Old Guard and the last 3 were Young Guard. 9th (Young Guard) and 10th (which was the Mamlouks) squadrons added on 6 March 1813.

    Régiment de Dragons de l’Impératice – 15 April 1806 decreed the formation of the “Régiment des Dragons de la Garde Impériale” of 2 squadrons plus 1 squadron of velites each of 2 companies. 4th squadron added in 1807. On 1 August 1811 strength increased to 5 squadrons of 250 men each. In 1811 Headquarters 45 men; each company of 124 men. In January 1812 the velites were disbanded. In 1813 there were 6 squadrons and 2 squadrons of velites – all squadrons had 2 companies.

    Mamelouks – January 1802 a squadron of 150 men was ordered, but in April strength was 168 men. Decree of 25 December 1803 called for a company of 123 Mamelouks to be attached to the Régiment de Chasseurs à Cheval de la Garde Impériale During Prussian campaign 1806 strength was back to a squadron with 160 men, which declined to 116 men in January 1807. 50 or so Frenchmen after 1809 were incorporated into the Mamelouks; strength for Russian campaign 109 men. On 6 March 1813 there was a squadron of 250 men and it became the 10th squadron of the Chasseurs à Cheval. The eastern & French Mamelouks were classed as 1st Mamelouks or Old Guard, while others were classed as 2nd Mamelouks or Young Guard.

    1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde – raised in March 1807 as “Regiment de Chevau-Leger Polonais de la Garde” with headquarters 35 men; 4 squadrons of 2 companies each of 125 men. In January 1810 took the name “Regiment de Chevau-Leger Lanciers Polonais de la Garde” when armed with the lance. Became “1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde” on 20 March 1810. 5th squadron added 11 March 1812. In 1813 the regiment grew from 6 squadrons to 10 squadrons

    2nd Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde – on 20 March 1810 4 squadrons of 2 companies each. Headquarters 32 personnel; ?? company. On 11 March 1812 there were 5 squadrons of 250 men each. 10 January 1813 there were 8 squadrons each containing 250 men; and 58 velites. Cavalry of the Garde de Paris incorporated on 3 February 1813 – regiment’s strength was now 10 squadrons (5 Old Guard and 5 Young Guard).

    3rd Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde – created by decrees of 5 and 10 July 1812 with 5 squadrons each of 2 companies. Destroyed at Slonim on 18 October 1812. Survivors were incorporated into “1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde”.

    Chevau-Legers de Berg – September 1808 regiment of 4 squadrons of 2 companies each. 1st squadron admitted into the Guard and sent to Spain with Joseph Bonaparte; 2nd squadron joined Joachim Murat in Naples; remaining 2 squadrons remained in Germany and incorporated into newly raised Régiment de Chasseurs à Cheval du Grand-Duc de Berg. On 11 January 1809 the Chevau-Legers were disbanded and men divided between the Guard cavalry regiments and the new Berg Chasseurs à Cheval. Towards the end of 1809 the Chasseurs à Cheval were armed with lances and renamed “Régiment de Chevau-Légers de Berg” and on 17 December admitted into the Guard. In 1812 a 2nd regiment was raised using a cadre from the 1st Regiment.

    Tartares Lithuaniens – squadron formed 24 August 1812 and attached to the 1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde. On 9 December 1813 the remaining men were incorporated into 3rd Régiment d’Éclaireurs à Cheval.

    Gendarmes d’Elite –Decree of 29 July 1804 created the Imperial Guard. Consisted of headquarters (31 men), 2 mounted squadrons of 2 companies each (86 men per company) and half a foot battalion (2 foot companies, each of 121 men). Foot element disbanded 15 April 1806. A second series of “Gendarmes-bis” created in 1813 and immediately assigned to the Young Guard.

    Gendarmes d’Ordnance – created 24 September 1806 2 mounted squadrons with 2 companies also 1 company on foot. Headquarters 11 plus men; 124 men per company The foot company was dissolved on 24 December 1806. Disbanded on 12 July 1807.

    Gardes d’Honneur – created between 3 and 5 April 1813, 4 “Régiments de Gardes d’Honneur”. Regiments were to consist of 10 squadrons with 2 companies each of 122 men. On 6 September 1813 the regiments were attached as follows: 1st Regiment to the Chasseurs à Cheval de la Garde; 2nd Regiment to the Dragons de la Garde; 3rd Regiment to the Genadiers à Cheval de la Garde; and 4th Regiment to the Lanciers de la Garde.

    Éclaireurs – 9 December 1813 created 3 Regiments d’Éclaireurs à Cheval of 4 squadrons of 2 companies each. Approximate target strength was 1,000 men per regiment. The 1st Regiment was composed of Old and Young Guard and attached to the Genadiers à Cheval; the 2nd Regiment was composed of Young Guard and attached to the Dragoons; and the 3rd Regiment, composed of Young Guard was attached to “1st Regiment de Chevau-Legers Lanciers de la Garde”.

    Artillery

    Artillerie à Cheval – on 29 July 1804 became “l’escadron d’Artillerie Légère de la Garde Impériale”. In 1806 became a regiment of 3 squadrons of 2 companies each. 17 April 1808 reduced to 4 companies. 1809 became Old Guard. 1813 back to 6 companies.

    Arillerie à Pied – Regiment of 7 companies (6 gunners & 1 pontoniers) created 12 April 1808. 3 Young Guard companies created 9 June 1809. 4th young Guard Company formed 12 December 1811. 5th & 6th Young Guard companies joined in January 1813. 8 new Young Guard companies joined in April 1814
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 24, 2010 at 04:07 PM. Reason: Imperial Guard
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  6. #6
    Semisalis
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    446

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Just a reminder, you should add how in 1808(or somewhere around there) the number of companies per battalion was reduced to 6

  7. #7
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Quote Originally Posted by MrT View Post
    Just a reminder, you should add how in 1808(or somewhere around there) the number of companies per battalion was reduced to 6
    Many thanks for drawing that to my attention - now corrected. My original draft had the info but somehow I must have deleted it!
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  8. #8

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Very useful, thanks for this. Do you have a rough indication of nominal / paper strength of the different formations types as the system evolved?

  9. #9
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Quote Originally Posted by 5th Lieutenant View Post
    Very useful, thanks for this. Do you have a rough indication of nominal / paper strength of the different formations types as the system evolved?
    Good - I do and will add them into the thread as it evolves.
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  10. #10
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Added under Other Foreign Troops:
    Légion du Nord
    La Légion Polacco-Italienne
    Légion de la Vistule.
    Bataillon Septinsulaire
    Régiment Albanais
    Chasseurs à Cheval Ioniens
    Bataillon des Chasseurs d’Orient
    Légion du Corses
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 09, 2010 at 03:17 PM. Reason: additional entries
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  11. #11
    Heiro de Bodemloze's Avatar Just climbing the Wall
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    GMT +1
    Posts
    1,743

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Great Work, Prince of Essling

    |Under the proud patronage of Robin de Bodemloze and the Bodemloze family|



  12. #12
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Have added:

    Regiments Suisse to other foreign troops in the Infantry section &
    Hussars to Line cavalry Section
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  13. #13
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Added to Line Cavalry:
    Dragoons
    Chasseurs a Cheval
    Chevau-Leger-Lanciers

    Added new Section "Line Artillery"
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 11, 2010 at 03:26 PM. Reason: new section
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  14. #14
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Added under Line Artillery:

    Artillerie de la Marine

    also amended Artillerie à Cheval de Ligne entry but please note that there are still many conflicts between sources so the information presented may not be 100 per cent correct; it is my best distillation.

    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 12, 2010 at 04:04 PM. Reason: qualifying comment
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  15. #15
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Added to Line Infantry:

    Strengths of companies in 1805;

    Added to Foreign Troops section
    Tirailleurs du Pô
    Tirailleurs Corse
    Régiment Joseph-Napoléon
    Légion Portugais
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 14, 2010 at 04:07 AM. Reason: Légion Portugais
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  16. #16

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Quote Originally Posted by MrT View Post
    Just a reminder, you should add how in 1808(or somewhere around there) the number of companies per battalion was reduced to 6
    Just out of curiosity was that a tactical change or an administrative change. In other words was the French drill manual amended to cater for a smaller number of tactical units, or was it similar to the change in the Imperial Guard organisation which was only a ploy to reduce the number of officers and NCO's on the regimental establishment.

  17. #17
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Quote Originally Posted by Didz View Post
    Just out of curiosity was that a tactical change or an administrative change. In other words was the French drill manual amended to cater for a smaller number of tactical units, or was it similar to the change in the Imperial Guard organisation which was only a ploy to reduce the number of officers and NCO's on the regimental establishment.
    Good question - I suspect both. Bibliography of French Military Manuals and Instructions at http://www.napoleon-series.org/milit...on/c_regs.html

    Comparing officers, NCOs, Drummers & privates:

    1805 battalion:
    Grenadier/Carabinier company 3 officers, 14 NCOs, 64 privates & 2 drummers
    Fusilier/Chasseur/Voltigeur company 3 officers, 14 NCOs, 104 privates & 2 drummers
    Total for battalion: 27 officers, 126 NCOs, 896 privates & 18 drummers
    in other words: 1 officer per 33 privates; 1 NCO per 7 privates

    1808 battalion:
    All types of companies 3 officers, 14 NCOs, 121 privates & 2 drummers
    Total for battalion: 18 officers, 84 NCOs, 726 privates & 12 drummers
    in other words: 1 officer per 40 privates; 1 NCO per 8.6 privates
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  18. #18
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    New entry:

    Gendarmerie Impériale
    Gendarmerie d’Espagne
    Garde de Paris
    Compagnie de réserve
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; December 15, 2010 at 05:07 PM. Reason: additions
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  19. #19
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    Major expansion of Compagnie de réserve entry.
    Sign DLC petition for improved map for NTW
    Useful Websites |Napoleon: Masters of Europe |
    The Wardrobe of 1805 |Napoleon: Art of War|
    Frederick the Great: Art of War|
    Under the Patronage of Gunny
    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

  20. #20

    Default Re: French Army Regimental Names

    One thing that I can't get my head around as far as the French Army organisation and tactic's are concerned is the apparent contradiction in Nafzigers description of how it worked. I don't know if you have any greater incite from your other books.

    On page 25 Nafziger waxes on about the importance in understanding the difference between the administrative organisation of a battalion in terms of its company structure and the tactical organisation of the battlaion which was determined by its divisions and platoons. He makes the point quite forcefully that these were two completely independant structures and companies were not used as the basis for tactical maneouvre.

    However, when it comes to the French Army of 1808 it is clear from Figures 17, 18 and 19 on pages 62 and 63 that he is showing the companies not the platoons as the maneouvring units of the battalion. More confusing still is the fact that according to these diagrams the presence of both flank companies is essential to completing the tactical formations depicted, even though we know that in practice these flank companies were frequently detached or massed into composite battalions.

    If these diagrams are taken literally it would mean that French battalions were incapable of forming square once either of their flank companies were detached as these companies are shown as necessary to form the rear wall of the formation, which I find hard to believe.

    Do you have any thoughts on this?

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •