Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 140

Thread: Preview: The Qarthadastim

  1. #1
    tanit's Avatar Libertus
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    54

    Default Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Greetings Europa Barbarorum fans.
    Today we are proud to present the Safot Softim biQarthadastim, who return to the field of battle in Europa Barbarorum 2. In this preview you will be shown an update on changes to the EB2 map in the Western Mediterranean, brand new Semitic settlement images, new units fighting for the glory of Qart-Hadast, the re-worked Qarthadastim family tree, complete with biographies, and details on the new Qarthadastim government system. Finally, the preview includes a heartfelt thank you to for the assistance of Professor David Mattingly.

    Our people were not always soldiers.
    We were not always the rulers of an Empire.
    When we came to this country we paid rent for the land we lived on.
    But the other Western colonies came under assault from many enemies,
    The Western Greeks such as Syracuse and Massalia,
    Libyans and nomads of Africa,
    and Iberians.
    So we made a stand.
    We, traders and merchants unversed in the art of war,
    supplemented our own citizens with foreign soldiers loyal to the paychest,
    and we marched out to carve for ourselves an Empire in the west
    that would preserve the religion, power, and culture of the Canaanites.
    An Empire founded, and ruled, by the Qarthadastim.

    'We will either find a way, or make one' - Hannibal




    Zeugitania, Corsica and Sardinia Province Descriptions
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Province: Zeugei

    It is said of this country that, when the Carthaginians first arrived, a tax was placed upon them for whatever land they occupied. It is also said that Elissa, the Queen of Carthage at the time of its foundation, was told by the native tribes that she and her followers could posses as much land as she could cover with an oxhide. Being a woman of great intelligence and ingenuity she divided the oxhide into many pieces, and, laying out an outline for the city by placing the pieces of the hide side by side, so cheated the Libyans of their trickery and secured the site of Carthage. Whether or not this is true I do not know, I merely repeat what I have heard.

    Zeugei is a rich land with great abundance in farmland and forest. It borders the region of Muxsi to the north along the river Medjerda, wherein great serpents are said to live, and the region of Byzakion to the south along the coast. To the Southwest Zeugei borders Tiskat, the land of the Massilian Numidians who dwell in the plains and the foothills of the mountains.

    The land of Zeugei is dominated by two main geographical regions. The first of these is the great peninsula at the very north east of the country. This peninsula in turn shelters the other dominant geographic region which is the Gulf of Tunis. It is this gulf which provides the shelter and resources which have given rise to the many hundreds of prosperous ports therein.

    Geography: While Zeugei is a small region its terrain makes it exceedingly prosperous. The territory of Zeugei lies at the center of the western outcropping of Africa, the eastern being the region of Kyrenaia. Along the coast of Zeugei is the peninsula which shelters and thus creates the natural harbor in which Carthage and many other ports are located. Carthage itself is located within a smaller natural harbor of its own which may have been manmade. This coastal region is where the true value of Zeugei lies. But it is not the only boon of this land.

    The Medjerda river to the north provides a steady lifeline of water as well as a trade route into the interior of Africa as far as the lands of the Massylian Numidians and even further up into the foothills of the Atlas mountains. The land around this main river as well as the many smaller rivers is extremely fertile and, worked by the native Libyans, provides a steady source of food. The plains are not the only fertile lands here. The forests of this country provide abundant lumber for construction and ship building.

    The land is abundant with many different creatures. Large numbers of horses are raised on the fertile plains both of larger breeds similar to European horses as well as the smaller ponies favoured by the natives. While elephants are a rare sight this close to the coast by this time, instead being more common in the foothills of the mountains, they can still occasionally be found, especially when they are imported specifically for the purpose of being trained for war. Native lions have largely been pushed into the interior of the land but are not an uncommon sight. Monkeys are commonly traded as pets, particularly for the amusement of children. Other creatures found in these lands included antelopes, gazelles, buffaloes, and asses, oryxes, whose horns are used for the curved sides of citherns, and whose size is about that of the ox; foxes, hyaenas, porcupines, wild rams, dictyes, jackals, panthers, boryes, land-crocodiles about three cubits in length, very like lizards, ostriches, and little snakes, each with a single horn, three sorts of mice in these parts; the first are called two-footed; the next, zegeries, which is a Libyan word meaning "hills"; and the third, urchins. Many of these creatures had been competed out of the northern coastal regions such as Zeugei, certainly by later times, but they may have still existed in this region at this time. Bees were raised in neighboring territories and may have also been raised in Zeugei.

    History: This land was dominated by a number of native tribes, given the common term for native Africans, Libyans, by the Greeks, which primarily included the Maxyan tribes. Herodotus lists several other Libyan tribes in this area and, while his information can often be somewhat unreliable, it is the only source for early times in this region. These tribes are the Zavecians, Gyzantians and the island of Cyraunis. At some point beginning in the twelfth century BC, and continuing through to the eight century BC, Phoenician colonists began to arrive on the coasts of Africa and founded several colonies. These colonies included Carthage. Early myths suggest tension between the colonists and the locals of some sort, yet not violent. While these myths of this time are undoubtedly exaggerated, this does not mean that there isn’t something to be learned from them. Some sort of pressure was exerted by the natives on the colonists and whether it was a land tax or not, it is presented as one of the catalysts for the emergence of Carthage as a regional power and its subsequent dominance over the western Mediterranean.

    At some point before the fifth century BC Carthage was a prosperous trading city in Zeugei, but still under pressure from the locals of some sort. Carthage, according to ancient historians, saw this pressure and compared it to the conquest of Phoenician colonies in Sicily and the pressures exerted upon these colonies in Spain and other parts of Africa. These observations convinced Carthage that action must be taken and we are told by historians that they threw off their land tax and subdued the surrounding region of Zeugei. Following this, Carthage set out on a campaign to supposedly liberate the many Phoenician colonies of the western Mediterranean from the oppression of Greeks, Iberians and Libyans.

    As Carthage rose in power its port, triple walls, and religious sector became renowned throughout the ancient world. A number of historians journeyed to Carthage to observe these structures for their writings. It is also likely that, given the sheer size of the religious complexes, pilgrims from other colonies may have come to Carthage. Certainly Carthage regularly sent ambassadors and offerings to Tyre and the religious complex there even after the second Punic war. In the surrounding country the Libyans were best known for working vast amounts of farmland.
    In 310 BC Agathocles of Syracuse crossed over to Africa and the territory of Zeugei experienced invasion for the first time. Zeugei had of course experienced conflict between the native tribes and Carthage before and Carthage had suffered at least one attempted coup, but it was not on the same level as an invasion by an external enemy. Agathocles’ invasion resulted in another attempted coup in Carthage as well as the ravaging of the land. While many Libyans took to Agathocles’ cause, enough did not that Agathocles was eventually forced to retreat from Africa. A similar invasion under Regullus took place during the First Punic War, but the greatest upset to Libyan life came during the Mercenaries War shortly after the First Punic War ended. During the Mercenaries War Libya revolted almost completely and sided with the mercenaries. The resulting devastation caused by both Carthage and the mercenaries, neither side offering any concession to their opponent, wrecked Libya and greatly reduced its prosperity for a time. The devastation and loss of life among the male half of the population may have been so great as to have been the cause of the disappearance of charioteering in Libya, a previously national pastime. After the Roman victory in 146 BC over Carthage, the territory of Zeugei slowly lost its identity as a Libyan territory.

    Strategy: This building represents the individual characteristics of a province. From the cities and villages, to the culture; from the landscape and ground, to the unique artifacts of old and new civilizations each province has a unique character that a faction would do best to heed if it wishes to utilize the resources to their best advantage. This building can offer a faction unique units depending on the Recruitment Buildings present, or can offer extended bonuses to certain Infrastructure Buildings. Additionally some provinces served as Sub-Capitals in history due to their location and traditional importance, some were economically orientated, others militarily or religiously. These provinces give additional bonuses depending on the combination of Civic Buildings you decide to build there. Finally, there can often be some small Public Order bonuses from unique buildings, monuments and natural features detailed in the description above or as separate buildings.

    Province: Shardin et Korsim

    This area includes some of the oldest phoenician and punic colonies, along with more recent additions inherited by the etruscans after the battle of Alalia.

    After Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica represented perhaps the second most important colonial possession for the punics. Home of the once-thriving nuragic civilization of the bronze Age, these lands are a mix of civilized and wild, with fertile lands providing grain, olives and grapes in the south while the north produced mostly wax and herd animals. Bordering the mountains, the semi-barbaric remnants of the nuragics are an ever-present danger of raiding, requiring constant vigilance at the borders but also providing a steady supply of mercenaries in times of need.

    Geography:The plains of Sardinia and Corsica consists of the most fertile and more colonized part of the province. In the south, fertile plains provide grain cultivated by imported lybian
    slaves, while the hills produces olives and grapes to this day, providing a steady source of supplies.

    Being one of the earliest punic colonizations, the native nuragics also provides a good source of pottery, while the local mines are known for their copper and lead, with some small amounts of silver. To the north and nearing the mountainous areas timber and cork are aplenty, while goat and sheep herds provides wool and meat. Corsica is also a important source of wax, being the main product of the island.

    History: The first phoenician outposts are as old as Carthage itself, with the foundation of Nora, the regional capital, dated around the VIII-IX century BC. The stele of Nora is among the most ancient written documents in western mediterranean, referring to Tartessus (b-Tršš) and Sardinia itself (b-šrdn). Originally the land was dominated by the ancient nuragic civilization, which thrived between the XII and XIII centuries BC, going into a slow but steady decline after. It appears that the early characters of this civilization shared many similarities with the phoenician culture, making the initial relations quite friendly.

    Between the V and VI century BC there was a shift towards expansionism in carthaginian
    policies, which led them to expand in the nearby islands. The first magonid attempt was repelled by the still-powerful nuragic tribes after some initial success, and it is said that to avoid crucifiction Mago, the appointed general, took Carthage by storm with the remnants of his army and tried to instate a monarchy. This attempt was however short lived, and soon after the senatorial system was reinstated. Three following major campaigns allowed the carthaginians to progressively conquer the coastastal areas of Sardinia, starting with the modern sulcis area and then expanding towards northern areas. The battle of Alalia, dated in the mid V century BC also allowed the Carthaginians to expel the phocean greek from Corsica, giving them shared possession of the smaller island with the etruscans and allowing a much-tighter control of the thyrrenian sea.
    This in turn enabled them to tighten the tin trade towards Sardinia, giving them another advantage towards the final colonization of one third of the island, firmly obtained by the time of the etruscan demise.

    Progressing through the centuries a very high level of integration was abtained between punic and nuragic populations especially in southern Sardinia, with many of the Nuraghes (conical stone towers, originally used for observation and as fortifications) converted to religious site, while the semi-barbarized remnants of the independent natives kept control of the hilly areas. By the time of the punic wars the romans described the nuragics as a race mixed with the africans and worthless slaves (Sardus venales) as they were rebellious and often tried to kill their "owner" at the first chance.

    Nora, the regional capital, would keep its importance until the early empire, and while the carthaginians kept attempting to recover the islands after loosing them between the first punic war and the mercenary uprising, this proved impossible despite the high point of the Hampsicoran rebellion, where a mixed punic and nuragic force was beaten by the romans. The punic influence towards the region would remain strong long after the roman conquest however, proved by the founding of punic inscriptions up to the end of the 1st century AD.

    Strategy: This building represents the individual characteristics of a province. From the cities and villages, to the culture; from the landscape and ground, to the unique artifacts of old and new civilizations each province has a unique character that a faction would do best to heed if it wishes to utilize the resources to their best advantage. This building can offer a faction unique units depending on the Recruitment Buildings present, or can offer extended bonuses to certain Infrastructure Buildings. Additionally some provinces served as Sub-Capitals in history due to their location and traditional importance, some were economically orientated, others militarily or religiously. These provinces give additional bonuses depending on the combination of Civic Buildings you decide to build there. Finally, there can often be some small Public Order bonuses from unique buildings, monuments and natural features detailed in the description above or as separate buildings.

    Province: Barbagia

    Shophet, those are truly wild and barbaric lands, inhabited by proud and restless people! The mountainous areas of Corsica and Sardina are an impervious land, covered by thick forest and home to the last remnants of the nuragic civilization.

    Tribes like the Balares, Ilienses and Korsi were a constant thorn in the side of the carthaginians first and the romans later on. Before the punic wars a system of fortifications was used to keep the areas under check, as the nuragics stubbornly tried to retake control of their native lands even after almost three hundred years of colonization.

    Geography: Mountainous and covered by thick forests, this areas were the home of the last independent nuragic natives, who survived in the valleys and highlands dominated by them mostly through goat and sheep herding. The carsic geology of the areas led to mountains with several cave complexes and dolines, providing occasional and at times even permanent hiding places, like in the nuragic village of Tiscali, built literally inside a mountain. This provided and ideal territory for ambush tactics, which allowed the poorly equipped natives to repel many invasions and fight on for nearly 5 centuries. Herds, Timber and wax were the only produces of the area, while slaves were cheap but also of low value due to their historical rebelliousness.

    History: Although far less prosper than the coastal areas the interior of Sardinia and Corsica was still inhabited by several nuragic tribes. With fewer resources at their disposal, the nuragic complexes tended to be smaller and simpler in construction, with later development being fortified enclosures not unlike the celtic oppidas. Often built in high places of difficult access like Orruinas in Sardinia and the Mt. Cinno site in corsica, those mountain nests were the ideal base for tribes living out of herding and
    raiding, providing nearby highlands and shelters extremely difficult to locate and storm.

    Historically the area experienced an increase in population after the punic campaigns of the V century BC, where the late nuragic tribes were driven off the more fertile lands. Being historically a line of defence, the mountains provided an excellent raiding base, forcing the punics to be constantly watchful and ultimately resulting in the development of the punic equivalent of a series of limes delimiting their area of influence. This situation was substantially unchanged until the end of the first punic war and the start of the mercenary uprising, where the carthaginians lost control of the islands. The unstable rule of the mercenaries, who tried initially unsuccessfully to defect to Rome led to the rise of a puno-nuragic native coalition who successfully started driving off the mercenaries.

    The romans found corsica and sardinia initially as an extremely cheap sources of slaves, with Cato giving the appellative of "Sardus venales" due to the low prices of the slaves, which was also given by their rebellious spirit, gaining them epithets like "latruncoli mastruccati" and similar ones. By 237, with the end of the african uprising and the island de-facto independent, the romans accepted the renewed offers by the rebellious mercenaries and proceeded to annex the island despite punic opposition. Taking their policies further, Carthage was accused of preparing an invasion against Rome and further fined, leading to the undisputed loss of Sardinia and the start of a bitter resentment by the punics and especially the barcid clan. This later on led to the spanish campaign, ultimately leading to Hamilcar's and Hannibal's preparation and escalation towards the 2nd punic war.

    In 215 BC a local Puno-nuragic noble called Hampsicora joined forces with several nuragic tribes and started an uprising after the battle of Cannae, appealing to Carthage for help. The subsequent battle of Cornus was however a loss for the carthaginians, and while nuragic resistance against the romans kept going on, it slowly became mostly a guerrilla campaign. The last large-scale revolt against the romans is dated around 174BC, possibly marking the real start of Roman colonization of the interior of Sardinia and Corsica

    Strategy: This building represents the individual characteristics of a province. From the cities and villages, to the culture; from the landscape and ground, to the unique artifacts of old and new civilizations each province has a unique character that a faction would do best to heed if it wishes to utilize the resources to their best advantage. This building can offer a faction unique units depending on the Recruitment Buildings present, or can offer extended bonuses to certain Infrastructure Buildings. Additionally some provinces served as Sub-Capitals in history due to their location and traditional importance, some were economically orientated, others militarily or religiously. These provinces give additional bonuses depending on the combination of Civic Buildings you decide to build there. Finally, there can often be some small Public Order bonuses from unique buildings, monuments and natural features detailed in the description above or as separate buildings.


    Mini-Preview: Map Changes in Europa Barbarorum
    The campaign map for Europa Barbarorum 2 will feature numerous changes, both large and small, from that of Europa Barbarorum 1. These changes include borders, ownership, province names, different cities, different ports, and amalgamation, removal and addition of provinces. In this preview of Carthage we will highlight some of the changes that will be made to North Africa's provinces.

    Provinces Lost: The province of Augila, like Cydamae from version 0.8, will be gone in EB2. It was decided that the importance of Augila did not equal that of the province set to replace it and Augila was amalgamated with Kyrenaia.

    Provinces Created: The new province of Tiskat was created in Africa east of Numidia but west of Byzacena to provide the new Massylian Numidian faction with a starting province since the Massylians did not conquer Cirta until later on. Furthermore the capital of this new province, Tocai (modern day Dougga), contains a monument for the Massylian royal line suggesting that it was the seat of their power before they conquered Cirta. Being an inland province, Tiskat does not have a port. The province name, Tiskat, comes from a list of Carthaginian regional names from administration documents for the area around Tocai.

    Province Name Changes: Dissatisfied with the Latin names for African provinces the team went in search of Punic names and found them. Several came from the list of regional names that Tiskat came from. These provided the new, or just slightly altered, names for the old provinces of Zeugitania, Atiqa and Byzacena, now Zeugei, Muxsi and Byzakion respectively. Other name changes included Mashiliem being called Maqom Hadesh, Mauretania Tingitana became Rus Lixus and Mauretania Massaesili became Numidia Massaesili. The original province names came from later Roman names for the provinces after a point when Numidia had been renamed Mauretania (Since the nation of Mauretania had been absorbed into the Roman Empire) and after Lixus, the most important west coast Phoenician colony, had declined under Roman administration, causing Tingis to rise to prominence.

    City Changes: Reevaluation of the importance of certain cities has resulted in changes in certain cities. For example in Mauretania the capital has been changed from Sala to Volubilis, an important capital and later an administrative site under Rome. Sala has become the new port. In what was formerly Mashiliem Ippone has been replaced by the much more prominent Iol as capital.

    Sardinia and Corsica: It was well known among the team as we started towards EB2 that there was something wrong with the representation of Sardinia and Corsica from EB1, mostly due to the control of the inland by the Nuragic tribes. However, given limited province slots it was unclear how this could be fixed. Eventually, thanks to the invaluable work of Zarax, the provinces were satisfactorily reworked. Now the province of Sardin et Korsim includes the coastal regions of the islands and some of the southern mainland of Sardinia. The new capital is at Nora while Karali has become the port. The interior of the islands is now the province of Barbagia with its capital at Orruinas.



    Semitic Settlements

    Huge City




    Soldiers of Qart-Hadast

    Libyan Skirmishers - Mitnag'him Lybim

    From Egypt to Mauretania live the tribes of coastal North Africa known as a whole to the Greeks as Lybians, after their word for Africa, Lybia. Their brave warriors fight with throwing darts, javelins and spears, and while poorly equipped for heavy combat they carry swords, a common weapon among Libyans. Their variety is represented by their shields, coming in different shapes and sizes and made from the skins of cows, goats, elephants and ostriches, as well as their appearance. Some examples include the Maceans who wear their hair as a crest and the Maxyans who shave the left side of their head. These men are swift and sure, but cannot stand in the face of heavily armed opponents, or the weight of cavalry. Lead them well general and they will win you battles!

    Historically these men come from a vast variety of tribes; Adyrmachidae, Gilligammae, Asbystae, Cabalians, Aushisae, Ammonions, Nasamonions, Psylli, Garamantines, Lotophagi, Maceans, Machlyans, Atlantes, Atarantians, Auseans, Gyzantians, Maxyans, Zavecians and Masylies, to name but a few. Most Libyan tribes were remarked by ancient authors as sporting light skirmishers of some form. According to Herodotus Ammonion skirmishers were called darters. Libyan skirmishers were present in the war between Carthage and Agathocles in 310 BC as well as throughout the Punic wars, noted in Hannibal’s army as skirmishing in front of the army in the initial engagement alongside Balearic skirmishers and slingers.
    Libyan Infantry - Lo'hamim Lybim

    Trained in the tactics of our ancestors and the Greeks these Libyan subjects are levied from the holdings of Qart-Hadast and the other colonies to defend their interests. Although as the fourth century came to its close and the third began the Libyans were still armed and trained in the traditional manner of Levant hoplites, more effort was put into their training and equipment, forming them into a Hellenistic style thureophoroi unit with thyreos shields, spears and the traditional javelins of the Libyan tribes. Later, following increasing influences from Celtic, Roman and Iberian contact, the Carthaginians would equip their Libyan levies with chain mail, improving their holding power. While these men are decent line infantry, and certainly cheaper and safer than placing important Canaanite citizens on the field, they will not hold up against the heavier infantry of other nations or their heavier cavalry.

    Historically the Carthaginian citizenry realized early on that it was far more cost effective to employ large numbers of Libyan levies, and even to train those levies, than to utilize their own citizenry, or even that of the other Phoenician colonies. This lesson was driven home at the battle of the Krimissus in Sicily, against Timoleon, when approximately ten thousand citizen soldiers were destroyed and routed, including the 2,500 strong Sacred Band. Following this Libyan infantry forces remained the core of the Punic army in the wars with Syracuse and then Rome. They served as Hannibal best troops as well as the reliable centre of Hasdrubal’s line in Iberia. The policy of using Libyan soldiers only backfired once, when they rebelled in large numbers in the eponymous Libyan, or Mercenary, war after the First Punic War. In this instance they initially pushed back all Punic resistance until Carthage recalled Hamilcar and Hanno, the generals who had trained the best of them, allowing Carthage’s armies to finally emerge victorious.

    Liby-Phoenician Hoplites - Dorkim Kan'anim

    These are the men of average wealth, merchants, craftsmen, artisans, masons and the like who can afford a full panoply of linothorax armour, a hoplon shield, a spear and a sword. They are not state formed or equipped and are merely those citizens of Canaanite colonies who, in times of crisis, have the equipment ready to engage in battle in defence of their home and livelihood. This is the old style and over time, as more subjects are equipped to fight by the Qarthadastim state, fewer colonials are prepared to do battle.

    Historically, the Phoenicians did not refer to themselves as such. Though the Greeks called them Phoenicians and the Latins Punics, the Phoenicians referred to themselves by their city of origin, Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, and so on. Even citizens of colonies referred to themselves by either their colony home, or the name of the city that founded the colony. The only identifier Phoenicians might have used to refer to themselves as an overarching ethnicity would have been Canaanite, the name of the large ethnic group in Israel and Lebanon from which the Phoenicians emerged. This is ironic as Canaanite was originally a made up name, to describe the people that became known as the Canaanites, meaning merchants. Later Greek and Roman authors often discounted the colonies outside of Africa that Carthage controlled and referred to the colonies in Africa as Liby-Phoenician, even implying that they were inferior to Carthage because they had bred with native Libyans. Whether or not they did mix with Libyans, the Carthaginians viewed them as inferior because they were not Carthaginians, a simple, and very Phoenician, mentality. There is no evidence to suggest Carthage treated the Phoenician colonies in Africa any different from those elsewhere in Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Baleares and Spain, except perhaps for the city of Utica, but it was a special case.

    If any of these colonists were to organize as an infantry force they would have done so in the same manner, as a hoplite phalanx. Even the citizens of Carthage fought in the same way, in this militia force, when necessary. This happened in the late fourth century BC with the invasion of Agathocles, in the First Punic War with the invasion of Regulus, during the Mercenary War and in the Second Punic War with the invasion of Scipio Africanus. This only changed by the time of the Third Punic War when Carthage had surrendered most of its arms and armour to Rome before the war began and was forced to reequip quickly with mass produced swords, thureos shields and javelins. Phoenician hoplites supposedly accompanied Hannibal’s forces in Italy and may have been reequipped with chain mail, attributed by the Romans as an adaptation to their tactics and technology.
    Liby-Phoenician Cavalry - Parasim Kan'anim

    These are men of somewhat more than average wealth who can afford a horse in addition to a panoply of sword, armour, spear and shield. These men may be politicians, wealthy land owners or extremely well off merchants as well as possibly belonging to an equestrian tradition in their home city. They are not state formed or equipped and are merely those citizens of Canaanite colonies who, in times of crisis, have the equipment ready to engage in battle in defence of their home and livelihood. This is the old style and over time, as more subjects are equipped to fight by the Qarthadastim state, fewer colonials are prepared to do battle.

    Historically, the Phoenicians did not refer to themselves as such. Though the Greeks called them Phoenicians and the Latins Punics, the Phoenicians referred to themselves by their city of origin, Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, and so on. Even citizens of colonies referred to themselves by either their colony home, or the name of the city that founded the colony. The only identifier Phoenicians might have used to refer to themselves as an overarching ethnicity would have been Canaanite, the name of the large ethnic group in Israel and Lebanon from which the Phoenicians emerged. This is ironic as Canaanite was originally a made up name, to describe the people that became known as the Canaanites, meaning merchants. Later Greek and Roman authors often discounted the colonies outside of Africa that Carthage controlled and referred to the colonies in Africa as Liby-Phoenician, even implying that they were inferior to Carthage because they had bred with native Libyans. Whether or not they did mix with Libyans, the Carthaginians viewed them as inferior because they were not Carthaginians, a simple, and very Phoenician, mentality. There is no evidence to suggest Carthage treated the Phoenician colonies in Africa any different from those elsewhere in Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Baleares and Spain, except perhaps for the city of Utica, but it was a special case.

    If any of these colonists were to organize as a cavalry force they would have done so in the same manner, as a medium combat cavalry. Even the citizens of Carthage fought in the same way when necessary. Citizen cavalry performed admirably during the invasion of Africa by Regulus in the First Punic War as well as during the Mercenary War afterwards. Citizen cavalry from other colonies, noted as Liby-Phoenicians by later authors, joined Hasdrubal in Spain during the Second Punic under orders from Hannibal. It is most likely they were from African colonies as Hannibal notes they were brought to Spain to ensure tight bonds between African cities and Spanish cities. Cavalry deployed by the Sardinian rebel Hampsicora in the Second Punic War against the Romans to try and bring the Carthaginians back to Sardinia may have been Phoenician cavalry either formed from Puno-Nuraghic nobles on the island or sent by Carthage itself to help Hampsicora’s efforts.
    Carthaginian Noble Cavalry - HaParasim HaB'hurim

    Members of the oldest and most prestigious families in Carthage, these men are better equipped, and better trained, than almost any other citizen soldiers among the colonies. These cavalry, armed with long lances and fine swords can ride down all but the toughest opponents. Their finely crafted armour from Italy, Iberia and Africa in bronze and iron make them all but invincible and their sturdy Iberian mounts, protected themselves with peytrals and chamfrons, will carry them unto their enemies doom!

    Historically the number of Carthaginian citizenry who were regularly trained and prepared for war were few, though they did exist. Those of this group from the wealthier families, or who became independently wealthy, would have the means to equip themselves as cavalry above and beyond the regular citizen cavalry called together in times of need. These cavalry would typically be deployed where they could do the most good, such as on the right flank of the army, where the infantry division of the phalanx known as the Sacred Band was deployed. These elite cavalry were at some point incorrectly labelled as a mounted version of those picked phalanx troops and the misnomer stuck through the ages, building a legend upon itself including being the temple warriors of Astarte. There is another famous legend about the supposed mounted Sacred Band from later history wherein they are denied to Hannibal at Zama. This story is extremely circumspect, especially considering the illusion that is the mounted Sacred Band. Regardless, the story is intended to prove a point about the attitude of the anti-Barcid party in the Carthaginian council. That is to say that they did not support Hannibal, even at the threat of their own lives and would not support him in the least.
    Sacred Band - Dorkim B'hurim

    Members of the oldest and most prestigious families in Carthage, these men are better equipped, and better trained, than almost any other citizen soldiers among the colonies. Fighting in the manner of our ancestors as a traditional Phalanx, these men, wealthy aristocrats all, are equipped with the most expensive and showy accoutrements available. These men have always formed the right flank of our citizen armies in times of need, but the wars of the last hundred years have demonstrated how precious Carthaginian citizens are. Should you choose, however, these men can be risked in battle for the betterment of Carthage.

    Historically the Carthaginians were cautious of committing citizens troops to battle after the losses suffered against Timoleon and Agathocles. When they did commit citizen soldiers, the right flank of the phalanx was formed by the wealthy aristocrats and was referred to by the Greeks as a 'Sacred Band'. Later, this was attributed to a dedication to Baal, the great father god of the Phoenician/Canaanite pantheon. The early third century BC was the end of an era for these noble citizen soldiers. Though the citizens of Carthage were once encouraged to be soldiers, according to Aristotle, by wearing decorative armbands to signify the number of campaigns they had fought in, the losses in Sicily in 396 and 341, and the losses to Agathocles and the coup of Bomilkar from 311-307, led to the growing reluctance of Carthage to risk its citizens in war. Yet, with the Sacred Band still operating in 307 BC, it would not have been too late to revive the military traditions of Carthage.
    Balearic Slingers - Qala'im Balearim

    Trained from a verly early age in the use of their various types of slings and projectiles, they have reached an extremelly rare proeficiency in long range skirmishing. Fast, due to their light equipment, and with much more precision and power than other slingers, they are ideal mercenaries to have in any army that can afford their services. Contrary to most light skirmishers, their experience can be used effectivelly to strike down any unorganized foes in hand-to-hand combat. As any light infantry, they are vulnerable to cavalry.

    Historically, the Balearic Slingers became famous throughout the mediterranean world due to their increadible skill in battle. These skills prompted the Carthaginians and Romans to use them whenever they were able to do so. A good example of the skill that won them renow is Diodorus Siculus' chronicle of the Battle of Eknomos in 311BC: "But when Hamilcar saw that his men were being overpowered and that the Greeks in constantly increasing number were making their way into the camp, he brought up his slingers, who came from the Balearic Islands and numbered at least a thousand. By hurling a shower of great stones, they wounded many and even killed not a few of those who were attacking, and they shattered the defensive armour of most of them. For these men, who are accustomed to sling stones weighing a mina, contributed a great deal toward victory in battle, as they practised constantly with the sling since childhood. In this way they drove the Greeks from the camp and defeated them. Their equipment for fighting consists of three slings, and of these they keep one around the head, another around the belly, and the third in the hands. In the business of war they hurl much larger stones than do any other slingers, and with such force that the missile seems to have been shot, as it were, from a catapult; consequently, in their assaults upon walled cities, they strike the defenders on the battlements and disable them, and in pitched battles they crush both shields and helmets and every kind of protective armour. And they are so accurate in their aim that in the majority of cases they never miss the target before them. The reason for this is the continual practice which they get from childhood, in that their mothers compel them, while still young boys, to use the sling continually; for there is set up before them as a target a piece of bread fastened to a stake, and the novice is not permitted to eat until he has hit the bread, whereupon he takes it from his mother with her permission and devours it!!"



    Family Tree

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    The Punic family tree was somewhat difficult to design as Carthage mixed emphasis on family lines (like in dynastic states) with emphasis on individual prowess and rising through the ranks like with Rome. Thus the family members of Carthage were a mix of actual lineages and displaced individuals who needed to be attached to other family members. There are also a lot of repeated names in Punic aristocracy resulting in a lot of confusion. Polybius was of great help in deciphering some of this, but not all. In addition the Carthaginians almost never recorded the names of important women and thus the names of all the women in the family tree had to be randomly chosen, based only on the knowledge that we know these men were married and had children. We hope the biographies below, which will appear in game, will help explain these characters, why they were chosen, what they did in history, and how they relate to each other.
    Biographies of the Qarthadastim

    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Deceased Family Members:
    Adherbal (86), Hanno (65) and Himilco (70) - The three generals who led the final push against Agathocles that drove him out of Africa and back to Sicily in the late fourth century BC. These generals were also likely important in the battles against Pyrrhus in Sicily. Though young to the command against Agathocles, it has been 50 years, and these generals now serve only as a link to create a stable family tree.

    Eshmunkhilletz (59) - Known from the dedication inscription for the New Gate street in south Carthage, Eshmunkhilletz was the father of Adonibaal, the eponymous Suffete of Carthage at some point in the third century BC. Eshmunkhilletz serves as a useful deceased family member to help generate the tree.

    Hannibal (60) - Hannibal was the father of Hanno, a negotiator for Carthage with Agrigentum and Syracuse. Hannibal is known only by his referral as Hanno's father.

    Gisgo (54) - The eponymous father of Hannibal Gisgo, a commander for Carthage during the First Punic War. He is known only by his referral as Hannibal's father.

    Living Family Members
    Hanno the Elder (32) - Hanno the Elder was a Punic commander in the First Punic War. He brought relieving forces to Agrigentum in the early stages of the war, and, although he failed there, he later commanded the left wing at the battle of Ecnomus, to this day the largest naval battle ever.

    Hanno the Great (10) - In 264 BC, the First Punic War began. Rome pushed the Carthaginians back to two cities in the far west of Sicily, Drepana and Lilibaeum. However, the Carthaginians controlled the sea, and the war had become a stalemate. Hanno was successful in African conquests, bringing wealth into the city's coffers. This earned him "the Great" as an appellation. However, Hamilcar Barca continued the Sicilian war as a guerilla, with some success. In 241 BC, the new Roman fleet beat the last Carthaginian ships.\n\nThe Carthaginian mercenaries returned to their homeland, expecting the pay promised them by Hamilcar. When they were not paid, they revolted. They captured the most important cities of Africa. Hanno, later joined by Barca, fought the mercenaries in a brutal war, which ended in 238 BC.\n\nCarthage was not big enough for Hamilcar and Hanno, but the city's fortunes were slowly restored, and there was money for pursuing two policies at once. Expansion was possible in two directions, Africa with Hanno and Iberia with Hamilcar. In 219 BC, Hamilcar's son Hannibal Barca was provoking a renewal of the war with Rome. Hanno had never believed in expensive military adventures outside Africa, and argued against the Second Punic War, but the Barcids won the discussion and war broke out. After the fall of Hannibal it was left to Hanno the Great to negotiate the peace.

    Hamalcar (28) - Hamalcar was a Carthaginian general in the First Punic War. Following the defeat of Hanno the Elder at Agrigentum, Hamalcar took command in Sicily. After a long campaign in Sicily, including dozens of sieges, with varying success, Hamalcar commanded the center in the battle of Ecnomus, to this day the largest naval battle ever. Hamalcar was the father of two other Carthaginian commanders in the First Punic War, Hanno and Hannibal.

    Hanno (12) - The son of Hamalcar, Commander in Sicily during much of the First Punic War, Hanno came into his own later in the war. It was he who conducted the infamous negotiations with Regulus in which Regulus demanded more than the people of Carthage could accept. Hanno turned him down and the war went on. Regulus was soundly defeated by the Carthaginians, eventually killed by them, and the Romans did not raid Africa again until the Second Punic War.

    Hannibal (10) - The son of Hamalcar, Commander in Sicily for much of the First Punic War, and brother to the Hanno who conducted negotiations with Regulus, Hannibal was a far less renowned member of his family. Although a general of Carthage, noted as a Trierarch, and known as the closest friend of the First Punic War admiral Adherbal, Hannibal is not otherwise well known.

    Adonibaal (43) - An inscription dedicating the completion of a new south bound road to Carthage's New Gate, sometime in the third century BC, makes note of the Suffetes of the year, Adonibaal and Shafat. In particular, Adonibaal was the Magistrate Suffete, meaning that he gave his name to the year, like the Eponymous Archons at Athens. He was the son of Eshmunkhilletz and the great grandson of Bodinelqart.

    Shafat (40) - An inscription dedicating the completion of a new south bound road to Carthage's New Gate, sometime in the third century BC, makes note of the Suffetes of the year, Adonibaal and Shafat.

    Hanno (24) - The First Punic War was reportedly begun when the city of Messana, under threat from Hiero of Syracuse, appealed to both Carthage and Rome for protection. Carthage reacted first and placed a garrison in Messana under their Sicilian commander. When the Romans finally reacted and arrived at the straits of Messana, the Punic commander is alleged to have told the Romans that they would not so much as wash their hands in the sea. There are different versions of how the Romans crossed the straits. Some say that the commander snuck across in the night, others that they defeated the Punic fleet and crossed in force. In either case, the Romans were welcomed with open arms by the pro-Roman party in Messana, who also handed over the Punic commander. While details once again differ on the manner of the commander's death, all agree that he died at the hands of Mammertines he had come to protect. The most commonly accepted name of this commander is Hanno.

    Bostar (18) - Although he may have been the Bostar who served under Hamalcar in Sicily, Bostar is first, and best, known for being the governor of Sardinia during the Mercenary Revolt, also known as Truceless War. He was seized and murdered by the mercenary garrison of the island before they offered it to the Romans.

    Himilco (16) - Himilco was the commander of Lilibeo during the long siege it was put under in the latter half of the First Punic War. He oversaw the daring blockade runs of Hannibal Rhodos, as well as solving potential rebellion among his mercenaries after it was pointed out by Alexon the Achaean. An inspiring and respected governor and commander, Himilco most likely survived the First Punic War, though no mention of him is made afterwards.

    Hanno (29) - Son of Hannibal and father of Hasdrubal, Hanno negotiated alliances with both Agrigentum and Syracuse at the outbreak of the First Punic War. When the alliances turned sour, it seems Hanno was forced into a state of retirement. He may have returned to the command in Sardinia in 258, though the Hanno who fought the Roman raids there is not clearly identified.

    Hasdrubal (11) - Son of Hanno and grandson of Hannibal, Hasdrubal was given a command in Sicily from 255-251 and elected as a general. The command turned out to be a disaster for him, suffering multiple defeats, and he may have been executed for his failure, though the certainty of that fate is unclear.

    Hannibal Gisgo (17) - Son of Gisgo and father of another Hannibal, Hannibal Gisgo is often referred to as Gisgo for short. Hannibal commanded the garrison at Agrigentum in 261. Following the failed attempt to break the Roman lines by the relieving forces under Hanno the Elder, Hannibal snuck out of Agrigentum in the night with his men, leaving the inhabitants of Agrigentum to the sword and chain of the Romans. Later, he embarked on an ambitious plan to raid the coast of Italy to interrupt Roman supplies and disrupt their homeland. He was the only general to attempt this until much later in the war when the concept was taken up by none other than Hamilcar Barca. At the Straits of Messina, he captured consul Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Asina by sending out Boodes in command of a small force. Hannibal's efforts were disrupted when he engaged the Romans in the naval battle of Mylae and was the first to face the new Roman corvus. Caught unprepared by this new boarding device, Gisgo was defeated. Forced into an inlet on the coast of Sardinia, surrounded by Romans with no visible path to escape, he was executed by his own men.

    Hannibal (1) - Son of Hannibal Gisgo and grandson of Gisgo, Hannibal continued the family tradition of serving as a general in the Carthaginian army. He served in the tail end of the First Punic War.

    Hannibal (30) - The commander of the Carthaginian naval squadron at Lipari at the onset of the First Punic War, Hannibal was responsible for both convincing the Mammertines at Messana to accept a Punic garrison, and for convincing the forces of Syracuse to withdraw from their advance on Messana. He has been proposed as the potential father of Hamalcar Barca, father of the famous Hannibal Barca. The reason for this is based on the theory that sons would be named after their father's father in a family line. Although this seems to be the case less often than the proposers of the theory seem to indicate, it is true that Hamalcar Barca first takes over his command at the Lipari islands when he enters the war, the place where Hannibal commanded, and that for age and details presented, Hannibal of Lipari is the best option among the available Hannibals.

    Hamalcar Barca (3) - In the First Punic War in 247, he took over Carthaginian command of Sicily from Carthalo after it had almost completely fallen into Roman hands, and landed on the northwest shore (near modern-day Palermo) with a small mercenary force (including Gauls), seized Mount Erote, and held it for three years against all odds. He expanded his position and carried out audacious raids as far as the coast of southern Italy. Six years after his arrival, he was unbeaten, but his land victories were irrelevant after the Roman victory of Catulus over Hanno at sea in 241 BC. Hamilcar left Sicily on his own terms, refusing Roman demands for surrender. He resigned his command to Gisco, disgusted with Hanno and the political situation.\nHis returning veterans were denied pay by the assembly, and began the bloody Mercenary War. Hanno failed to quell them, after which Hamilcar was given command. He at first treated his captives leniently, hoping to entice the insurgents to his side, but after the rebel leaders executed Gisco and their prisoners, he retaliated against his captives.
    Hamilcar finally put down the rebellion in 237 BC, having massacred thousands of rebels in the process. During this time, Rome annexed Sardinia.\nAfter the war, events are not clear. Hamilcar was likely involved in political struggles with the aristocracy, after which he invaded Hispania on his own, figuring the people would support his actions later. This conquest would somewhat replace the loss of Sicily and Sardinia, as well as give a starting point for a future invasion of Rome. His young son Hannibal accompanied him, and Hamilcar died bravely in battle there about 229 BC, fighting the Vettones.\nHe seems to have had a generous spirit, but, like many other great men, he did not want his freedom constrained by lesser men.

    Bomilkar (17) - Bomilkar was elected Shophet in 260 BC. Otherwise he is best known as the father of Hanno, a cavalry commander in Hannibal Barca's army in the Second Punic War. Bomilkar was married to one of Hannibal's three elder sisters, one of Hamalcar's daughters, thus making him Hannibal's uncle and making Hanno Hannibal's nephew.

    Gisco (16) - Known only for his progeny, Gisco was the father of Hasdrubal, the commander of Carthage's forces in Iberia in the Second Punic War. Hasdrubal Gisco was eventually defeated by Scipio, later Africanus, sealing the fate of Carthage's interests in Spain.

    Agents, Admirals and Ancilliaries:
    Boodes (27) - Diplomat - Boodes was a member of the Inner Council of Carthage's Senate during the First Punic War. He commanded a detachment under Hannibal Gisgo in a naval battle against Rome where he captured Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio, the humiliating defeat thereafter causing him to be named 'Asina', or Wild Ass.

    Hannibal Rhodos (16) - Spy - During the lengthy siege of Lilibeo in the First Punic War, the Romans created a blockade to prevent the city from receiving reinforcements, supplies, or news by ship. That was until a daring Carthaginian named Hannibal, and nicknamed Rhodos for his naval skill, ran the blockade to deliver supplies and news to the city of Lilibeo. For weeks Hannibal ran the blockade, often pausing his faster ship to let the Romans catch up before darting off again. He successfully carried news back and forth and ran supplies to Lilibeo as well as lifting the spirits of the defenders. Like all good things, Hannibal's blockade runs came to an end when the Romans created an artificial sandbar overnight, causing Hannibal's ship to run aground, thereafter to be boarded and plundered by the Romans.

    Mago (45) - Admiral - Mago was the admiral who commanded the Carthaginian fleet against Pyrrhus of Epirus, eventually defeating him and claiming his flagship, a septireme known as the Hepteres. Mago later led his fleet on a diplomatic envoy to Rome in 274/273. When the Carthaginian fleet appeared off the coast of Italy by Taras in 272 to see if the Romans required aid, the fleet was likely still led by Mago.

    Adherbal (19) - Admiral - During the First Punic War the Carthaginians used a series of important ports to launch their fleet from, these included Lipari, Lilibeo and Drepana. Adherbal commanded the Punic fleet at Drepana together with Carthalo. He was an accomplished admiral who engaged the Roman fleet most notably at Drepana in 249. Giving a stirring oratory, Adherbal encouraged his mercenaries, adding them to the regular compliment of marines on his ships, then promised them additional pay and rewards if they won him a victory, before sailing out to meet the Romans. Adherbal outmaneuvered consul Pulcher's disorganised line and sunk almost all his ships. It was seven years before they rebuilt their fleet.\nPulcher escaped, but was exiled on charges of sacrilege (during the prebattle augury, he had thrown his misbehaving chicken overboard), though he escaped conviction on charges of treason.\nAdherbal died in 230 BC.

    Carthalo (18) - Admiral - Carthalo was a Carthaginian admiral who served under Adherbal at Drepana. He performed independently in two actions, both victorious, against the Romans which earned him a place in history. In the first he trapped a Roman fleet in bad weather against the southern coast of Sicily, causing most of the fleet to be sunk. In the second he reportedly briefly retook Agrigentum from the Romans.

    Gesco - Ancilliary - Although Gesco was a commander at Lilibeo at the end of the First Punic War, he is better known for his fate suffered shortly thereafter at the onset of the Truceless War. Gesco was placed in charge of distributing the much delayed pay to the mercenaries and other soldiers brought home from Sicily. Although he advised that they be brought home in small groups, the government ignored him and brough them all over at once. The mercenaries grew restless with waiting through the process of being paid and began to stirred up by a Libyan named Mathos. When the mercenaries brought their complaints to Gesco, he responded in a moment of frustration that if they wanted their money they should ask their leader Mathos. The mercenaries grew angry and took Gesco prisoner, escalating to a full scale revolt. Gesco was later killed as an example of the ends the mercenaries were willing to go to to have their demands met. He was the first victim of the Truceless War.

    Alexon the Achaean - Ancilliary - During the Lengthy siege of Lilibeo in the First Punic War, Alexon was one of the mercenary commanders in the Carthaginian garrison. When he became aware of a plot by several of the mercenary commanders to defect to the Romans, he informed the Carthaginian governor of the city, Himilco, who orchestrated with Alexon to have the ringleaders removed. Alexon had apparently performed a similar duty for Syracuse before the First Punic War when some of their mercenaries had wanted to rebel.

    Bodmelqart - Ancilliary - Bodmelqart, brother of Yehawwielon, son of Baalhanno, son of Bodmelqart, was the chief engineer of public highways in Carthage in the third century BC.

    Yehawwielon - Ancilliary - Yehawwielon, brother of Bodmelqart, son of Baalhanno, son of Bodmelqart, was quarrier in Carthage in the third century BC.

    Philinus of Agrigentum - Ancilliary - Philinus of Agrigentum lived during the First Punic War and wrote its history from a pro-Cathaginian standpoint. His writings were used as a source by Polybius for his description of the First Punic War. Although Polybius uses Philinus' writings he does also accuse him of being biased and inconsistent. Philinus maintained that the initial Roman intervention in Sicily at the start of the First Punic War violated a treaty between Rome and Carthage which recognized Roman sovereignty on the Italian peninsula and Carthaginian control in Sicily.




    In this preview, released previously by Twitter, we introduce the one of the core gameplay mechanics of Europa Barbarorum II. This exciting new feature builds upon the Government system from Europa Barbarorum I, but goes much, much further. It introduces individualised Government buildings for each faction, and uses relationships with other buildings to create a detailed, complex and ultimately rewarding experience that throws the player into the reality of a divided and politically active province and its people. The enemy is no longer simply outside your borders, now you will need to deal with those who would seek to undermine you from within.

    Click the Image above.

    Following from the preview of the Authority buildings and details on how provinces will be represented in Europa Barbarorum II, and the preview of Roman government types, we are proud to present the next of many faction-specific previews of this Authority system. As the Qarthadastimi you will have the ability to expand your Empire as you see fit; will you focus on creating economic partners along the shores of the rich Mediterranean, or will you focus on expanding your military might through the subjugation of local political powers and the appropriation of their military traditions and manpower? In Europa Barbaroum II the choice is yours.

    Listed below are all the Central Authority buildings available to the Qarthadastim faction in EB2. The buildings take their names from the political relationship that a region's people have to Qart-Hadast.
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 

    Authority: Military Control

    The province, now occupied with the military forces of the great Qart-Hadast and her allies, must now be placed under a military control; ruled directly by a general and his staff. This control of the province is only meant to be temporary, but will ensure that the province will not revolt from under his command so soon after the conquest.Under the leadership of a powerful conquerer the people of this province, now subjugated by the armies of Qart-Hadast and freed from their old oppressors, will not risk the threat of further violence and bloodshed by challanging his authority here. Be wary, however, for a disloyal general given the command of such a large area may well be tempted to call himself King and betray the trust of his rightful leaders, calling the land and its people his own. Make sure the control of this province, then, lies in only the most trusted general, loyal to the city and ideal of Qart-Hadast; not to his own ambition.


    HISTORY: Like most ancient nations the first act of the Carthaginians upon conquest of new territory would be to institute a garrison led by a commander who would take temporary charge of governing the new territory until a better administrative system could be established. The best known examples of this for the Carthaginians were the cities conquered during the second Punic War. Whenever Hannibal took a city by force he would leave behind a strong garrison and move on, unable to take the time to set up a more complex and lasting system of government due to the constant war of attrition with the Roman forces.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the AUTHORITY POLICY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level of the building is the precursor level and represents the preliminary military occupation of province within the area of your direct influence. It is preferable for you to upgrade this to a more permanent form of government as this adversely affects the effectiveness of the AUTHORITY POLICY BUILDING. A GENERAL must be stationed here during the period of military occupation and is essentially de facto ruler of this province. Beware of leaving GENERALS with low LOYALTY in such a powerful position as they may see better oppurtunities and greater fortunes as autonomous rulers rather than as subjects of your faction.


    Military Control has been established; the General stationed here essentially has de facto control over the province and you must be careful that this power doesn't go to his head.


    Authority: Allied Kingdom

    A people, ruled in fear by a despot, will show great favour to those willing to war on their behalf. Once conquered and defeated, a people willing to except the close friendship of Qart-Hadast will be well rewarded with autonomous rulership under a governance more suited to their own traditions and society. The city of Qart-Hadast's policy here is not to impose their will into shaping the government of these new allies, but instead the local political classes are encouraged to rule their province according to their own traditions, with little to no interference from Qart-Hadast's own council or government traditions.

    These Allied Kingdoms, while not under the direct control of Qart-Hadast, do owe much to their new allies and the diplomatic ties and relations fall heavily in the favour of the great city. Such a policy of handing over rule of a newly conquered province holds many benefits for Qart-Hadast and in times of few resources can help expand her influence without bleeding her treasuries dry. Extending internal markets into these areas is a simple matter, and trade will boom under the new found relationships between these two states. Furthermore, the military assistance to armies of Qart-Hadast from these new founded partners can widen their tactical strengths and lessen their tactical weaknesses.

    Be wary, however, of the man who rises to lead this Allied Kingdom of Qart-Hadast; a man in such a position, particularly if surrounded by powerful and ambitious men, may forget himself and his loyalty and seek to pursue a state of affairs free from those who had shown him mercy.

    HISTORY: Many of the nations and territories aquired by Carthage were not conquered through force, but instead had offered their territory to Carthage in exchange for protection from their various enemies. Most of these allied states were Phoenician because of the special privileges offered to other Phoenician colonies and the role Carthage had taken on as defender of the colonies. However, on a number of occaisions other peoples offered their lands and services to Carthage and were equally taken. The best known examples of this are the Balearic Isles and Messana. In the case of Messana the populace feared that requesting Punic aid would place them under direct control of the Punic government and they would lose their freedom and autonomy. Because of this many Mammertines cast out the Punic garrison and allowed Rome access to their city. Ironically this action would cause them to be absorbed almost completely into the Roman Republic where they would fade into history.

    Other examples of allied nations include the many cities and tribes which went over to Hannibal in the second Punic War. Unlike those towns and cities conquered by Hannibal, these people were free allies of the Punic state.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level of the building represents the development of an alliance between existing power-elites in the province and your own faction. This alliance maintains pre-existing social and political structures, and does not define the nature of the internal governmental hierarchy, which will largely conform with the established and traditional forms of government in the region. The alliance, however, does define the relationship between your faction and this semi-autonomous, conquered state; this is not an agreement of equals, but rather a relationship forced upon a vanquished power and so, while it may be a treaty written in your favour, you should be wary of those ALLIED KINGDOMS that grow too powerful or those controlled by a ruler that is somewhat lacking in LOYALTY and common sense.


    An Allied Kingdom has been established; an understanding has been founded between the dominant power-elites of this province and your own faction. Be wary of the region becoming too powerful or being controlled by a General with more guts than sense, as you may find your ally has become an enemy too close for comfort.


    Authority: Military Administration

    A conquered people sometimes do not realise that they are conquered. In these circumstances a firm grip upon the province can only be achieved through a permanent military administration over the province. This is a longer term solution than Military Control: an administrative structure able to manage the affairs of a province and headed by a General of suitable acumen and loyalty will help secure the province amongst the possessions of Qart-Hadast. To support this administration, a series of garrisons and forts are established in the regions under Qart-Hadast's control and occupied with mercenary soldiers. These forts serve as defensive structures and statements of authority for Qart-Hadast's military in the province.

    This Military Administration, while long-term, does not seek to integrate the province fully into the Qarthadastim empire: it would not force locals to take up the mantle of their new rulers; to assume dynastic names for people or settlements. Because of the requirment of large garrisons of mercenary soldiers there are some significant economic penalties, but in times of need when war is afoot upon the land these garrisons can quickly assemble into a fighting force.

    HISTORY:In a few cases the use of a temporary military occupation and control of a territory needed to be extended for any of a number of reasons. The chief among these was the unrest of the populace and the danger offered by enemies bordering the new territory. Such a case was very common in the conquest of African territories where the peoples beyond the coast were semi-nomadic and unsettled, casting their lifestyle in contrast of the one that the Carthaginians supported. There was also the constant danger of enemy forces lying just beyond the borders of the province waiting to strike. The combination of these factors resulted in a continued military presence and control with a large number of small fortresses and increased garrisons.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level of the building represents a more long-term solution for the province. Best used in provinces where success is key, but survival is not. There is no limit to where these can be founded and they are suitable in all areas where a long-term solution is required but where simplicity and speed is of essence. Because standing garrisons of mercenary soldiers are required, there are significant economic penalties that will lessen the taxes that can be raised here. But with a network of forts being maintained and manned there is men enough to aid in the case of an attack upon the settlement or province.


    A Military Administration has been established; forts and settlements have been garrisoned in the regions under Qart-Hadast control.


    Authority: Native Administration

    Where a province needs more direct control than an alliance, but also needs time to adjust to the new Phoenician rulers of Qart-Hadast, it can be best to leave the general administration to local political elites, who can be supervised by Phoenician and Liby-Phoenician, but still maintain some level of autonomy from outside rule. By rewarding local nobility who are willing to support the Qarthadastim empire and penalising those who are not as forthcoming in their support, control can be maintained and authority extended throughout the province by relying on the traditional ruling classes and their modes of governance.

    This increased authority in the province can heavily influence the land that can be used for the purposes of colonisation along the rich coast-lines, and will prove important for the purposes of extending and developing the infrastructures of core industries in the province.

    An Autonomous Native Administration, while long term, is not a policy that seeks to fully integrate the province into empire of Qart-Hadast. To do so will require the development of rich trading colonies along available coast-lines and the establishment of large city-settlements capable of supporting large numbers of Liby-Phoenician settlers. These developments will allow the province to thrive as a trading colony, sending its money home to the treasuries of its great mother-city. Where trading colonies are not suitable, Carthaginian control is best kep either in the hands of the military or handed over to the native ruling elite either as an Allied Kingdom or as largely autonomous rulers supervised by Phoenician and Liby-Phoenician agents.

    HISTORY: In Iberia and Africa it was common of the Qarthadastim to play various rulers against each other, supporting the strongest and most loyal to Carthage in their rule over any given territory. This was much more common in Iberia where a system of marriages and supporting the right nobles and lords allowed for an administrative system over conquered and previously hostile people rather quickly. This system was much like a militarized and conquered version of their Allied Kingdoms. It was, however, prone to being torn apart by an intelligent enemy. Scipio Africanus was expert at turning these situations around by supporting different lords, treating the locals with a great deal of respect and honour, and by offering better deals to the subserviant people where possible.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level represents a policy of allowing the local rulers some semblence of power without completely handing over the run of the province to them. There is some acceptance of Carthaginian adminstrative influence and small colonies may well be accepted in some of the coastal regions (if possible). They are most desirable in recently conquered provinces that lie within heavily contested areas of control or strategically important areas of interest for the Carthaginian Empire. Because of the lack of integration into the Carthaginian Empire, realistic recruitment must come from local troops and will be mostly suitable for garrison duty. Small TRADING COLONIES may well offer some heavier infantry or light cavalry, but they will be few in number unless you seek to expand the number of merchant-settlers here.


    An Autonomous Native Adminstration has been established; local ruling traditions have largely remained the same, though some Qarthadastim practices have been accepted. Administration of the province has largely fallen to the traditional elites of the province, though some Liby-Phoenician agents for Qart-Hadast have found a place here.


    Authority: Colony Administration

    Qart-Hadast's greatest assets are the web of trading colonies throughout the mediterranean and beyond. These settlements of Pheonician and Liby-Phoenician merchants are the cornerstones of the great trading empire that was, is and will be Qart-Hadast's. Their control by Qart-Hadast is of the utmost importance, as the control of trade is the control of great fortunes, and any sword, as the maxim goes, can be turned aside with a gold coin. Thus, for Qart-Hadast and her allies, the control of a colony is the control of the province. By centering the governance of a province in the coastal port settlements that are home to the powerful merchant-settlers, Carthage makes it difficult to fully govern a province, but such considerations are not so important for them. The wealth that flows through these settlements can be turned to extending the authority by bribing local leaders and the traditional ruling classes, however full control is generally too expensive to maintain to warrant consideration.

    In these Allied Colonies, control of the province has been turned over to the merchant-settlers themselves, with very little direct interference from Qart-Hadast herself. As long as trade flows from the ports of these colonies and military aid is forthcoming in times of emergency, there is little need to get aggressively involved with the governance of these settlements of the province. Generally the colony is controlled by similar methods as would be found in Carthage as the colonies are generally populated with Phoenicians or Liby-Phoenicians and draw upon the old, original Phoenician colonies as their inspiration (though native modes of government also have some influence). These alliances, based as they are on mutual trade and wealth, generally have a greater strength than just the simple relationships between Qart-Hadast and Allied Kingdoms, so there is little risk of the colony and its province forsaking their part in the Carthaginian Empire.

    Large colonies in particular are well suited to be Allied Colonies as they can generally defend themselves when threatened and have the internal infrastructure to support complex civil administrations without aid from Qart-Hadast herself. But even small colonies can benefit from being an Allied Colony, though they may be more inclined to call on military support when attacked by an aggressive neighbour.

    HISTORY: One of the most common forms of adminstration in the Carthaginian empire was that of allied colonial states. This was due to the very nature under which the Carthaginian empire had emerged. When founded, the city of Qart-Hadast had been as subserviant to the local populace trading with them and paying land dues to satisfy them. This was common of Phoenicians in general, being a race predisposed to passive resolutions. However when the Sicilian colonies were threatened by Hellenic invasion the Carthaginians threw off their land tax and set themselves up as saviours of the colonies. This view brought them to the aid of colonies in West Africa, Middle Africa, Sicily, Sardinia and Spain. While some of these colonies were directly governed at a later state, most were left as autonomous allied colonies.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level represents the option of handing over governance of a province's trading colonies to their settlers. This tends to appease the individual colonies when they grow large enough to actively seek independence within the empire of Qart-Hadast. Because the administration is not necessarily centralised in the province it can be difficult to fully govern every region, however the wealth that these colonies bring to the ruling classes can help persuade ALLIED STATES to except more authority from these TRADING COLONIES. Extension of authority, then can be achieved, though does cost money under these circumstances.


    An Allied Colony has been established; a large enough of colony will make itself suitable for governance by its own people as it will be able to spread its influence through trade and mercenary might.


    Authority: Supervised Colony Administration

    Qart-Hadast's greatest assets are the web of trading colonies throughout the mediterranean and beyond. These settlements of Pheonician and Liby-Phoenician merchants are the cornerstones of the great trading empire that was, is and will be Qart-Hadast's. Their control by Qart-Hadast is of the utmost importance, as the control of trade is the control of great fortunes, and any sword, as the maxim goes, can be turned aside with a gold coin. Thus, for Qart-Hadast and her allies, the control of a colony is the control of the province. By centering the governance of a province in the coastal port settlements that are home to the powerful merchant-settlers, Carthage makes it difficult to fully govern a province, but such considerations are not so important for them. The wealth that flows through these settlements can be turned to extending the authority by bribing local leaders and the traditional ruling classes, however full control is generally too expensive to maintain to warrant consideration.

    In these Governed Colonies a single representative represents the wishes and desires of the citizens of Qart-Hadast. This can make him unpopular, particular in large and capable colonies with well established cities under their control. In these circumstances the Phoenician or Liby-Phoenician colonists may begin to demand autonomy and self-rule and it may well be adviced for the central control of a Governed Colony to be lessened to appease these agitators: an autonomous allied colony is preferable to a rebellious one. When a colony begins to grow too large it is best to look to giving into some of their demands to stave off outright revolt.

    HISTORY: Wherever possible Punic control over their colonies was through a local governor supported by Liby-Phoenician settlers and any native Phoenician populations. This was only possible in instances where there was a significant population of loyal Phoenician or Liby-Phoenician settlers to support the administration. This type of government was surprisingly uncommon as most Phoenician colonies were autonomous allies and the Liby-Phoenician colonies had in a sense only just started to 'kick-off'. During the First Punic War a particular governor of Sardinia is mentioned, a man named Bostar. He would later die at the hands of his mercenary soldiers when they joined the revolt begun by their comrades in North Africa. The loyal population desired a return to Phoenician admimistration but the mercenaries brought in the Roman army which took over the colony and, eventually, the whole isle.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level represents the option of directly governing a province through its trading colonies, usually those established by the faction. Because the administration is not necessarily centralised in the province it can be difficult to fully govern every region, however the wealth that these colonies bring to the ruling classes can help persuade ALLIED STATES to except more authority from these TRADING COLONIES. Extension of authority, then can be achieved, though does cost money under these circumstances. As a colony grows it will tend to seek greater autonomoy for itself and its citizens. While it is small it won't demand too much as the protection of Qart-Hadast's armies are necessary for its survival in a sometimes hostile world, but as it grows and becomes more capable of looking after itself it will begin to demand certain rights, threatening a cut in trade and military assistance and eventually revolt and rebellion. To resolve this conflict, you can either limit the growth of the colony and in particular the POLIS building or give in to their demands and turn the province into an ALLIED COLONY.


    A Governed Colony has been established; a large enough of colony will make itself suitable for governance by Qart-Hadast directly as it will be able to spread its influence through trade and mercenary might.


    Authority: Council Administration

    Could anything be more beautiful than that great, white city of Qart-Hadast. Ruled by the two elected Sufetes and the council of elders, the city has survived great trials and rightfully ruled vast lands and administrated for many peoples of many creeds and codes. Qart-Hadast is their home and their jeweled crown; the other Phoenician settlements spread thinly across the seas are largely autonomous, though they look to Qart-Hadast as a ship looks to a lighthouse, for direction and safety. These colonies are only indirectly controlled, either through alliances drawn freely or governed by a representative of the city of Qart-Hadast. In Africa, however, things are different. Libyan colonisation of the interior regions of Phoenician controlled provinces have so far proved successful, and Qart-Hadast's province is itself fully governed by the council. Upon the strengths of these agricultural colonies, African expansion has become more and more desirable, and the council and its Sufetes now how to expand these holdings securely, by bringing them under the Council's direct administration, just like Qart-Hadast.

    A province, adminstrated by the Council of Qart-Hadast will find its fortunes rise and its authority, if not equal, then approach the prestige of Qart-Hadast herself. To be nominated so the colony must show itself poweful enough to extend its authority throughout the province entirely; governing all but the most far-flung reaches of their lands.

    Were Qart-Hadast to fall to the most foul of enemies, a Council Administrated province would be able to offer a safe haven to its council until such a time that they could be returned to their seat of power. If no other Council Administrated province exists then the council will be destroyed and be unable to restore themselves to power, even if Qart-Hadast once more lies in the hands of Phoenician citizens.

    HISTORY: At the heart of the Carthaginian empire lay their city of Qart-Hadast, ruled over by the council with their two elected Sufetes and their inner council of elders. This administrative system had served to prevent civil war, largely, and to successfully rule and make decisions for the Carthaginian people for almost the whole of the city's history. For the most part this adminstration only indirectly affected the various provinces of the empire, but in Africa they could achieve a greater degree of control if only due to their proximity. It is possible that this is why many council members favoured African expansion over Iberian. Even Utiqa, after it had betrayed Carthage, was placed under more direct governorship than before.

    STRATEGY: This building represents the political policies and control infrastructure that your faction maintains in the area of the province that it directly controls and influences, and also what relationship this area has with your faction. This building, therefore, works with the PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY BUILDING to represent the level of control your faction has over the entire province. Within the sphere of direct influence, your faction has the power and ability to control the form of government and political structure that the populace will adopt. This may represent either your faction making proactive choices on the type of government, or it may represent your faction allowing the province to be controlled in manner determined by the native powers of the province (and is thus not explicity defined within the building description); in either case the building also represents the diplomatic relationship between the province and your faction's power-base, and the province's place within the political web of your empire.

    This level represents the control of the province falling directly to the ruling council of Qart-Hadast. As such, the province can now accomadate the council if Qart-Hadast was to fall into enemy hands. If no province controlled by Qarthadastim has this level built in it then the council of Qart-Hadast is destroyed and this level will not be buildable again. Other penalties will also result from the loss of the council. This level also represents the province rising to far higher prominence in Qart-Hadast's empire such that high levels of the POLIS building will not cause huge PUBLIC ORDER penalties. This level allows the province to be fully governed without the need for large garrisons.


    A Council Administration has been established; the council and Sufetes of Qart-Hadast now hold direct control over the province and the colonies here benefit greatly from their raised status as such.




    Signature Banners









    A Search For Truth
    This thank you was originally supposed to be posted with the 'People of North Africa' preview, but due to some confusion it was forgotten. Thus, better late than never, here it is.

    When the EB team began concepting the units of North Africa for EB1 we found the sources on them to be vague at best and many of the representations in modern art are often contradictory, not only with each other, but also with ancient sources. As such it was decided that a great deal of in-depth research needed to be done to provide the most accurate representation of these people as possible.

    One member put forward the notion that we contact an expert in the Roman Frontier in Africa, as well as African tribesmen in general, one Professor David Mattingly. Professor Mattingly has dug at Garama, ancient capital of the Garamantine Kingdom, for some years now. Although we believed it a longshot we fired off an e-mail to the professor and lo and behold he responded! Not only did he respond, but he lavished us with pictorial references, citations from his own works, and personal suggestion on the equipment and dress of the Garamantines in the third century BC. Were it not for professor Mattingly it is quite likely our units for this region would have remained somewhat ahistorical and a proud civilization would have failed to make a significant impact upon EB.

    As such we would like to officially thank Professor Mattingly for his assistance and wish him all the best!

    We would also like to give a special mention to Dexter Hoyos, PHD. His help has been invaluable both on the definition of ethnicities and the development of the trait system (which you will probably see later).
    Last edited by tanit; November 05, 2010 at 02:11 PM.
    This war had lasted for three years and four months, and it far excelled all wars we know of in cruelty and defiance of principle. - Polybius, The Histories, On the Mercenaries War.

  2. #2
    tanit's Avatar Libertus
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    We hope you have enjoyed this preview of the Qarthadastim faction in Europa Barbarorum II.

    Please note that unless stated otherwise, ALL pictures, names, and descriptions shown in our previews are works in progress. We continue to improve on all parts of EB, and we will continue to do so long after our initial release.

    Since some areas where these news items are posted cannot handle wide images, we appreciate your restraint from quoting full-size images.

    As always, if you have questions or comments, the best place to post them is here, where the EB team is most active:

    Europa Barbarorum ORG forum

    Europa Barbarorum TWC forum

    A special thanks to Huene, Tux and JMRC for their excellent models and renders, Gustave for the wonderful unit skins and battlefield images and Pacco for the amazing Iberian Slinger skin, JMRC, Bobbin and Huene for the unit cards, Tanit for the sig banners, General Grievous for the fantastic stratmap models, Foot for the new game mechanics, Kikosemmek, Tanit and gamegeek2 for the new translated unit names, and to Zarax, Paullus, and Tanit for the historical info and text work.

    We give an additional thanks to Image Shack that provides us with a simple, foolproof, and free way to show you all these pictures.

    Have a great day!


    Libyan skirmishers :



    Libyan infantry :


    Liby-phoenician infantry :


    Sacred band infantry :


    Officers :
    This war had lasted for three years and four months, and it far excelled all wars we know of in cruelty and defiance of principle. - Polybius, The Histories, On the Mercenaries War.

  3. #3

  4. #4

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Marvellous! Thank you.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Woohoo! The new preview is up! And it is truely awe-inspiring! I think each turn is going to take forever in EB II, since players will have to choose between all these different Authority Buildings.

    In the second paragraph of the "Millitary Administration" building, it talks about the subjects not being assimilated into "The Ptolemaic Empire". I'm guessing that this is a slip of the typing finger? Regardless, this preview is amazing, and the units look stunning even compared to the units in EB I. They look like models you'd find in a First-Person game, not an RTS.

    +Rep. I wish there were some way to say "Give rep to the whole EB II team.

  6. #6
    Toshiro_Umezawa's Avatar Civis
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Numai, Takenuma (Italy ;) )
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    I'm speechless .
    Hyozan's founder

    "Vengeance, Justice...Fire and Blood!"

  7. #7
    Alexandros I.'s Avatar Ordinarius
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spain but born in Germany
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Excellent preview!!

  8. #8
    Horatius Flaccus's Avatar Ordinarius
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Nijmegen (Netherlands)
    Posts
    692

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Great!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Great !! But I want at least a beta of this mod

  10. #10
    Almogaver's Avatar Senator
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Gerunda
    Posts
    1,280

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    IMHO these are the best looking units so far! now let's read this preview thoroughly...
    --------------Arengada--------------


  11. #11

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    I believe the scientific term for this is "Sweet!"

  12. #12

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    AWSOME
    Hail Impetor Gauis Julius Caesar

  13. #13
    Joysong's Avatar Tiro
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    289

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    sweet, so nice preview. love it simple love it. but woulnd't it be nice if i made some familie portraits for it.

    please feedback my work and if you like i can help with the EB team

    http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?t=395248
    Last edited by Joysong; November 02, 2010 at 01:17 PM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Great preview. glad to see that everything is coming along so well

  15. #15
    EVYATAR's Avatar EvyatarNevoDesign
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    awsome!
    R.I.P Blackomur | The Shadow of Ishtar | Proud to be israeli
    My Tutorial | My Workshop | I.A.F Web | 2D Artist & Skinner

  16. #16

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    it is just amazing, have no words EB team thank u for the work u do

  17. #17
    Himster's Avatar Praeses
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Dublin, The Peoples Republic of Ireland
    Posts
    9,515

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Perfect.
    The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are so certain of themselves, but wiser people are full of doubts.
    -Betrand Russell

  18. #18

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Perfect!

  19. #19
    kepper's Avatar Artifex
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Olho
    Posts
    3,219

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    Great work
    <iframe width="480" height="360" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...get/video.html" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"> </iframe>

  20. #20

    Default Re: Preview: The Qarthadastim

    great work.

    KINGS AND PAWNS, EMPERORS AND FOOLS...

Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •