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Thread: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

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    Default Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Having received the book "Guerra Peninsular" today from Manuel Ribeiro Rodrigues, I will now post pictures of Portuguese uniforms from the Peninsular War. He has given me permission to post images from this book. Below: Uniform colours for regiments (1806-15). All wore dark-blue coats. Azul-ferrete= Dark-Blue. Branco=White. Encarnado=Red. Amarelo=Yellow. Azul-claro=Light-Blue. Remember that in 1806-9, the infantry wore white-trousers (white or light-grey after 1809) in Summer and dark-blue trousers in Winter.:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    The infantry wore shako-hats. Next is a template for the Portuguese Shako hat in the uniform plan of 1806-9:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description of the 1806-9 shako (with references to the picture):
    Quote Originally Posted by Guera Peninsula
    Made from black-felt (a) with a polished leather vizor (b) also in black. Above the vizor was a thin brass metal-band that ran the length of the vizor and with a cut-out regimental number in the middle (c); above this an oval cartouche, also in brass, with the Portuguese national arms in relief (d); on the back were to be found two black leather supports with buttons in hardened leather. A bow-shaped cockade (f) with the national colours of dark-blue and scarlet, in wool for the men of the line and of silk for the officers. Cords: In dark-blue wool braided with the colour of the uniform's lining (h) up to junior officers; with a gold cord
    The shako-hats changed a bit in the 1810 uniform plan e.g. now a cylindrical shape as shown below:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description of shako in 1810 plan:
    Quote Originally Posted by Guera Peninsular
    The 1810 model was cylindrical in shape, of the type nicknamed 'stove-pipe' by the English, and was manufactured in poorer quality materials than the 1806 version. It was made of black felt with leather reinforcement bands around the inside bottom and top quarters, the vizor being of varnished leather in the same colour. Over the vizor was a brass band, narrow and the same length as the vizor, in the middle of which appeared the regimental number, and slightly further up another brass plate, elliptical in shape, which bore the Portuguese Coat-of-Arms in relief. A bow shaped cockade in dark blue and scarlet was placed front and centre at the top of the shako at the b ase of the white plume, which was about 15cm long. The bow was made out of wool for privates and under-officers and in silk for senior officers as shown in Figure 46.
    Apart from this, the only other change in infantry uniforms during the Peninsular war was a slight change to the plume in the shako as follows:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description from book:
    Quote Originally Posted by Guera Peninsular
    Until the end of the Iberian Campaigns, or to be more precise up to 1815 there were no further changes in infantry dress except:
    Shako Plume: In there was a small change in the colour of the plumes used.


    Left-to-Right: Picture 1. Infantry Regiment No.7 (Setubal), Cadet, Light Infantry Company, summer uniform (1806-8). Picture 2: (man sitting down): Infantry Regiment No.15 (Oporto), 1st Sergeant of the Grenadier Company in winter uniform (1806-10). Note the grenade embossed on the shako band with cut-out regimental-number. Picture 3. Infantry Regiment No.21 (Valenca), Private in fatigue uniform (barracks service) summer 1806-10. Note the fatigue cap with piping in the facing colour; this cap later gave rise to the bivuac cap:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Same picture from behind (black and white). The numbers refer to the same as in the colour picture above:
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    Left to right: 1. Infantry Regiment No.3 (Estremoz), Colonel, summer uniform, mounted service, 1810-15 (Note the duty gorget at the throat, the rear of the coatee which different in cut for officers in cut for officers as compared with other ranks, the edging on the holsters and saddle cloth which corresponded to the rank the officer field, together with the piping in the colour of the Military Region). 2. Infantry Regiment No.23 (Almeida), Pioneer summer uniform (1806-10). (Note the crossed axes embossed on the shako band with the cut-out unit number, the distinguishing epaulette fringes in dark blue wool sewn to the cloth epaulettes, the leather apron, the gauntlet gloves and the axe, the strap which held the cartridge pouch so that it did not swing forward when the soldier moved or fell, this method being common to everyone equipped with them):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Same two soldiers from behind (black and white - numbers refer to same):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Musicians: Left-to-Right. Picture 1. Infantry Regiment No.11 (Viseu), Fifer in winter uniform (1810-15). (Note the braiding in the sleeves, and the leather case to protect the fife). Picture 2: Infantry Regiment No.9 (Viana), Drum Major in summer uniform (1806-1810) (Note that the soldier holds the rank of 2nd Regiment, also the braiding on the sleeves, around the cuffs and also the collar). Picture 3: Infantry Regiment No.4 (Lisbon), Drum Corporal in winter uniform (1806-10). (Note the two braid rings around the cuffs indicating the rank, the way the drum is suspended, the leather apron covering the left leg and the woollen braids along the seems of the sleeves):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Same picture from behind (numbers refer to same as colour picture:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Top-to-bottom: Picture 1: Infantry Regiment No.17, Fifer (1806-10). Picture 2: Infantry Regiment No.20, Lieutenant in winter uniform with greatcoat (1808-9). Picture 3: Drummer, Infantry Regiment No.20 (1806-9):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Infantry Regiment No.24; Corporal 1810-5:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Infantry Regiment No.6 in winter uniform (1806-10):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    6th Infantry Regiment in Summer uniforms (1806-10):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Picture 1 (Left): Infantry Regiment No.8 (Castelo de Vide), Private, summer uniform (1810-5) (Note the shako model 1809-10 with the 1806 pattern trousers). Picture 2: Infantry Regiment No.21 (Valenca), Private, winter uniform (1806-10) (Note the triangle of coat colour cloth holding the skirt flap back):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Same picture from behind (black and white):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Infantry Regiment No.15 Standard Bearers in 1806-10 and 1810-15. Picture 1: Infantry Regiment No.15 (Vila Vicosa), Ensign Standard-Bearer in summer uniform (1806-10) Picture 2: Infantry Regiment No.15 (Vila Vicosa) Ensign standard-bearer in winter uniform (1810-5):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Same standard-bearers from behind (black and white):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    [/QUOTE]Coatee:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description of coatee (uniform plan 1806-9):
    Quote Originally Posted by Guera Peninsular
    Made from dark-blue fabric, buttoned up the right side with eight large plain, brass buttons. The collar and cuffs, lining, lapels were all in the respective Regimental colours, Fig 3 and 4. The turnbacks were held in place by a small triangle of dark-blue. The cuffs were closed by two large buttons of the same pattern as the breast buttons. There was piping down the front beside the button holes and towards the turnbacks. The pockets were horizontal closed by a flap of the uniform colour and fastened by three small gilt metal buttons. The skirt flaps had coloured piping.
    Epaulets (1806-9 plan):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description in book:
    Quote Originally Posted by Guera Peninsular
    Epaulettes for Enlisted Men: Made from cloth in the same colour as the uniform with piping in the same colour as the lining, these were swen on to the shoulder with the upper flap fastened down with a button in the same style as those on the uniform.
    Next Fig 6-7: Waistcoat and shirt. Fig. 8 (next two blue pictures): Winter Trousers (made from dark-blue wool). Fig 9 (last 2 white pictures): Summer-Pantaloons (with a crotch piece in thicker white linen and fastening over the ankles with five buttons in ivory white.:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    In 1809, the following looser trousers was introduced:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Below left-to-right: Fig.10: Shoes made from Moroccan leather. Fig.11: Gaiters cut from black cloth, fastening with eight cuff buttons in the same colour. Fig.12: Fatigue-cap. Made from dark-blue cotton mix, with a hem and lining in the colour of the uniform's lining.:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Description of Fatigue-Trousers: Made from white or off-white fabric in the same cut as those in Fig 8 (see 2 spoiler-tags ago).

    Officer's Epaulets by rank:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    There are also some special-uniforms e.g. for grenadiers, officers, pioneers and fifers and drummers and I will post them today. Firstly, the special coats and brass-bands (on the shako hats) of Grenadiers and Light-Infantry Regiments:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Uniforms of Pioneers (Porta-machado) (Specialist members of a grenadier company),a Drum-Major, musicians and insignia of junior-officers:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 









    Officers' Uniforms:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Next, a duty-gorget worne by officers on duty around the neck by a cord of gold thread:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Next. a Colonel of Infantry Regiment No.23 in winter-uniform from uniform regulations of 19th May 1806:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Next: Infantry regiment No.5 at arms drill for the Exercise of Infantry, by order of William Carr Beresford, Lisbon (1810) (note that the soldiers are wearing the new mode shako bit that the trousers are still of the 1806 pattern):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Colonel of Infantry Regiment No.10 (1806-10) , wearing boots for mounted service:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Next. Infantry Regiment No.16 in winter uniform (1806-9):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Infantry No.1 (Lisbon), Bandmaster and band, summer uniform (1810-6) (note that a Bandmaster is holding the titular rank of 1st Seargeant and the distinctions of a Cadet, and eight Musicians, consisting of a base drummer, a side drummer, a clarinettist, a hautist, a trumpeteer, a serpent player and a bassoonist. Note also the yellow silk braiding along the seams of the sleeves):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Last edited by Geronimo2006; July 21, 2010 at 06:39 PM.
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Thank you, geronimo2006!

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    I've updated Post 1 with loads more pictures. Hopefully a modder will put them in the game as I can't mod NTW yet.
    Last edited by Geronimo2006; June 25, 2010 at 09:50 AM.
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Does anyone have any sources for the uniform of the Portuguese Army before it was placed under the command of the British. I've tried to find sources based on the war of the oranges in 1801, but so far no had much luck.

    I got the impression that the 1812 shako was actually modelled on the local Portuguese version, but even that seems doubtful given the information above. I just wondered how much British funding and patronage influenced the Portuguese uniforms in the restructuring of the army after the alliance.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Didz View Post
    Does anyone have any sources for the uniform of the Portuguese Army before it was placed under the command of the British. I've tried to find sources based on the war of the oranges in 1801, but so far no had much luck.

    I got the impression that the 1812 shako was actually modelled on the local Portuguese version, but even that seems doubtful given the information above. I just wondered how much British funding and patronage influenced the Portuguese uniforms in the restructuring of the army after the alliance.
    Only Knotel which I posted on mediafire http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=1...0654b192e70f3f and Osprey at rapidshare.com File: Osprey_-_Men_At_Arms_343_-_The_Portugese_Army_of_the_Napoleonic_Wars_-_Volume_1_-_OCR.pdf

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince of Essling View Post
    Only Knotel which I posted on mediafire http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=1...0654b192e70f3f and Osprey at rapidshare.com File: Osprey_-_Men_At_Arms_343_-_The_Portugese_Army_of_the_Napoleonic_Wars_-_Volume_1_-_OCR.pdf
    I downloaded what I think is the Osprey book you mentioned the last time, but most of the information in it is post-1809 and the uniform prints are all from 1808-1810. There is a brief mention of early regiments consisting of seven companies including one grenadier company but beyond that not much before the arrival of the British except for details of the Portuguese Legion in the service of France.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Would it possible to reskin the Portuguese drums to look like they do in the above pictures?
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    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Didz View Post
    I downloaded what I think is the Osprey book you mentioned the last time, but most of the information in it is post-1809 and the uniform prints are all from 1808-1810. There is a brief mention of early regiments consisting of seven companies including one grenadier company but beyond that not much before the arrival of the British except for details of the Portuguese Legion in the service of France.

    Sorry for any crossed wires. My current post is referring to the newer 3 volume Osprey Men at Arms on the Portuguese Army. I accept the earlier single volume on the Portuguese Army was not what you were after.

    Volume 1 does have colour plates of 1793-95 infantry uniforms, and a few others pre-British reforms. This newer version covers Portugal's political and military situation at the outbreak of war, Marshal Beresford's rebuilding of the Portuguese army, the general staff and the line infantry.
    Volume 2 which covers the light troops, the Cazadores, the cavalry, the engineers and the many smaller corps of the military and civil establishments, as well as colours and standards. It has a colour plate of an 1805 light infantryman. See http://rapidshare.com/files/.../Ospr...nic_Wars_2.pdf
    Volume 3 features the artillery, militia, volunteers, Ordenanza, offshore islands, colonies and the navy. Coloured plate of 1793 artilleryman. http://go.rapiddigger.com/rapidshare...-pdf-20303625/

    Osprey say that these are based on Portuguese as well as newly discovered British documents, it is hoped that this three-volume study will form the most extensive source yet published in English on the
    organisation and material culture of the Portuguese forces between 1793 and 1815.

    Volume 1 has a reasonable amount of detail of the material supplied by Britain to Portugal for example these paraphrased extracts:

    Between 1796 and 1801 shipments totalled some 32,500 muskets, 17,000 carbines (including 8,000 sergeants’), 6,300 pistols and 16,500 swords (including 3,500 for infantry and drummers), and 20 brass 12-pounder field guns with ammunition, accoutrements and equipments (PRO, WO 1/223). From 1808 that British government aid became extraordinary; great quantities of money, arms of all sorts, clothing, and equipments were sent.

    Between 1808 and 1814, Portugal received about 160,000 muskets, 2,300 Baker rifles, 3,000 cavalry
    carbines, 7,000 pistols and some 15,000 cavalry swords.

    Material for about 190,000 suits of clothing was sent from England between 1808 and 1815. Very little of this – apart from some green uniforms for the Loyal Lusitanian Legion – appears to have been
    shipped in 1808.
    Last edited by Prince of Essling; June 28, 2010 at 08:31 AM. Reason: additional info, clarification.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    I think there is a second "Guera Peninsular" book so I will ask Sr Rodrigues to send it on. Maybe we can learn more about the Cavalry.
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince of Essling View Post
    Volume 2 which covers the light troops, the Cazadores, the cavalry, the engineers and the many smaller corps of the military and civil establishments, as well as colours and standards. It has a colour plate of an 1805 light infantryman. See http://rapidshare.com/files/.../Ospr...nic_Wars_2.pdf
    Volume 3 features the artillery, militia, volunteers, Ordenanza, offshore islands, colonies and the navy. Coloured plate of 1793 artilleryman. http://go.rapiddigger.com/rapidshare...-pdf-20303625/

    Osprey say that these are based on Portuguese as well as newly discovered British documents, it is hoped that this three-volume study will form the most extensive source yet published in English on the

    organisation and material culture of the Portuguese forces between 1793 and 1815.
    Managed to download the second one 358, but got an error trying to download the first 346. Its interesting that the 1806 regulation shako was the false fronted design that later inspired the 1812 pattern British shako, but the Portuguese actually switched to the stovepipe shako in 1810 to minic the British.

    There were a few 1806 uniforms in 358, but I'm still curious about the 1801 uniforms. Not that it really matters that much I was just curious what the Portuguese Army would have been like if it was played as an independant faction without the British or French influences as in ETW.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Didz View Post
    Managed to download the second one 358, but got an error trying to download the first 346. Its interesting that the 1806 regulation shako was the false fronted design that later inspired the 1812 pattern British shako, but the Portuguese actually switched to the stovepipe shako in 1810 to minic the British.

    There were a few 1806 uniforms in 358, but I'm still curious about the 1801 uniforms. Not that it really matters that much I was just curious what the Portuguese Army would have been like if it was played as an independant faction without the British or French influences as in ETW.

    Sorry you had trouble with the link. You can find volumes 1 (no 343) & 2 (no 346) amongst a number of other Osprey MAA at http://filespump.com/osprey-men-at-arms_page5.html

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Didz View Post
    Managed to download the second one 358, but got an error trying to download the first 346. Its interesting that the 1806 regulation shako was the false fronted design that later inspired the 1812 pattern British shako, but the Portuguese actually switched to the stovepipe shako in 1810 to minic the British.
    I think that was partly because the chaos in Portugal caused by the French invasion forced the British to take over the provision of Portuguese uniforms so it would only be natural that British-style shakos were used. Portuguese uniform-production had usually been fairly chaotic anyway before 1806. Until 1806, the uniform plans such as those by Lippe were apparently largely theoretical, with the colonels deciding what exactly the uniform colours would be. Sr Rodrigues told me this a while back.
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Thank you so much for all that info Geronimo! I have been looking to obtain the Napoleonic era Portuguese rank insignia for years now and I finally found it!!!

    BTW: would you happen to know anything about generals rank insignia? I see the charts you posted only go up to colonel.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Quote Originally Posted by Wardude1987 View Post
    Thank you so much for all that info Geronimo! I have been looking to obtain the Napoleonic era Portuguese rank insignia for years now and I finally found it!!!

    BTW: would you happen to know anything about generals rank insignia? I see the charts you posted only go up to colonel.
    Can't find anything on that in the book so far but maybe there's something in the other book (300 Anos) much of which I haven't yet translated because I was focused on the 18th century when I was using it to help make units for my ETW mod.

    I am even beginning to question whether the office of General even existed in the Portuguese Army during the Napoleonic war - or if it did - whether there was a standard uniform for them. The highest rank whose uniform is described in the book is the Colonel.

    BTW, I've found this picture of a surviving Captain's epaulets from the Peninsular War, though the gold plating has come off the scales:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Last edited by Geronimo2006; June 29, 2010 at 01:36 PM.
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    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Geronimo - great stuff and most interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Geronimo2006 View Post
    Can't find anything on that in the book so far but maybe there's something in the other book (300 Anos) much of which I haven't yet translated because I was focused on the 18th century when I was using it to help make units for my ETW mod.

    I am even beginning to question whether the office of General even existed in the Portuguese Army during the Napoleonic war - or if it did - whether there was a standard uniform for them. The highest rank whose uniform is described in the book is the Colonel.
    According to Osprey vol 1 on the Portuguese Army the highest rank in the Portuguese army was that of marshalgeneral, followed by marshal; general of infantry, of cavalry or of artillery; lieutenant-general, ‘marechal de campo’ (major-general), and brigadier-general. These titles were brought in by the Count de Lippe from 1762 to replace ancient titles. In 1809 the Duke of Wellington was made the marshal-general of the Portuguese army by Joao VI. The marshal of the Portuguese army was William Carr Beresford; this was the highest executive rank in that force. In 1812 there were two generals, 15 lieutenant-generals (one British), ten major-generals (one British) and 27 brigadier-generals (11 British), giving a total of 56 general officers of whom 43 were Portuguese.

    Uniforms
    The dress worn by Portuguese general officers before the beginning of the 19th century was vaguely defined. The first regulation appeared in 1762 but mostly concerned rank distinctions. A marshal had ‘three fingers’-wide gold lace buttonholes and gold buttons on the coat and waistcoat. Lieutenant-generals had two gold laces ‘three fingers’ wide edging the coat and its cuffs and the waistcoat. A marechal de campo (major-general) had one such lace. Brigadier-generals had a
    plainer gold lace ‘two fingers’ wide. An ‘epaulette of gold cord’ might also be worn. The uniform as such appears to have been an all-blue coat with buff or white waistcoat and breeches. According to,portraits of generals, these instructions were interpreted freely. The 1806 regulations for general officers were very detailed. They even included plates showing in detail the types of embroidery, lace,
    buttons, weapons, etc to which each rank was entitled. There were two types of uniforms: dress and undress. The dress uniform was an all blue coat with long tails which were not turned back, gold piping edging the collar, cuffs, horizontal pockets, front closure and back vent, gold buttons and buttonhole lace. The uniform was completed by a red sash with silver tassels; white waistcoat, breeches and stockings; goldbuckled shoes or black high boots; a bicorn without lace (many portraits
    show gold lace, however) and with white plume edging from end to end, gold cord and cockade loop. Dress horse housings were red edged with gold lace and embroidery. Embroidery and epaulettes were according to
    rank:
    Marshal-general


    The uniform coat and waistcoat were edged with the most elaborate and richest palm leaf embroidery, the skirts being almost covered. No epaulettes nor aiguillettes.
    Marshal


    The uniform had rich palm leaf embroidery, but not quite so elaborate; it covered much of the collar, the chest and much of the sides of the skirt.
    General


    Palm leaf embroidery covering much of the collar, edging the chest and the sides of the skirt. One gold cord epaulette on the right shoulder supporting a very rich and elaborate gold aiguillette with gilt tips.
    Lieutenant-general


    Less elaborate palm leaf embroidery. Three rows of embroidery on each cuff. Two gold epaulettes, each with three silver stars on the strap.
    Marechal de campo (major-general)


    Similar but narrower palm leaf embroidery. Two rows of embroidery on each cuff. Two gold epaulettes, each with two silver stars on the strap.
    Brigadier-general


    Wide gold lace edging the collar, cuffs, pockets, front closure and back vent. Two gold epaulettes, each with one silver star on the strap.
    War Council (Conselheiros de Guerra)


    Generals who belonged to the kingdom’s War Council had three chain-lace embroidered chevrons with a button at the centre of each, worn points-down above the cuff on the left sleeve only.
    Inspectors


    General officers who were inspectors had an epaulette on their left shoulder which had three, long flat laces ending in thin fringes instead of bullion.
    Governors


    General officers who were governors wore their general’s uniform.

    The undress uniform for generals consisted of an all-blue coat with white piping and turnbacks; eight gold buttons on the front and three to each vertical pocket but none on the cuffs; and blue and gold turnback ornaments. Only the collars and cuffs were embroidered, with the same pattern of gold palm leaf lace as on the dress coat appropriate to each rank; and epaulettes of rank were worn. Brigadier-generals had, however, flat gold lace rather than embroidery edging their coat collar and cuffs. Generals could also wear in undress a white waistcoat, blue breeches, black high boots, and a bicorn laced with wide gold lace and edged with white plumes from end to end, with gold cord and cockade
    loop. Brigadier-generals had no edging plume to their hats, but a standing white plume instead. Horse housings for undress were blue edged with gold lace.
    Generals who were colonels of regiments could wear these distinctions on their regimental uniforms but, in practice, it appears that few did.
    Illustration from Osprey - shows left to right lieutenant-general in full and then undress, and a Brigadier general in full dress.

    Last edited by Prince of Essling; June 29, 2010 at 04:13 PM.

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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Excellent work Prince of Essling +1.

    Sr Rodrigues emailed me today and said that the other Guera Peninsula book has information on the cavalry and he will send photocopies. When I get those I will post them here. He has told me today I have permission to post all pictures from the book on this forum.

    He also has the score of Portuguese marches of this period. More info when I have it. Would be great if Brigadier Graham could add those tunes to his march mods.
    In 1809 the Duke of Wellington was made the marshal-general of the Portuguese army by Joao VI
    Strictly-speaking Prince Regent Joao (his mother Maria I was insane but still technically Queen until 1816).
    Last edited by Geronimo2006; July 21, 2010 at 05:07 PM.
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Prince of Essling I was sent an email today by Sr Rodrigues about your references to Osprey:
    Estive a ver o fórum com bastante atenção e preciso esclarecer algumas coisas.

    O nosso amigo Prince of Essling escreveu sobre os oficiais generais e o que leu nos livros da Osprey " The Portuguese Army of the Napoleonic Wars" volume 1, página 33. Só que o livro esclarece muito pouco sobre os postos e as distinções dos oficiais. Por exemplo a cada posto correspondia um bordado específico.

    Eu admiro imenso a obra do Sr. René Chartrand, principalmente pelos seus largos conhecimentos de história militar e principalmente de uniformes e trajes militares de todas as épocas, de todos os países, o que me deixa perplexo é a sua diversidade e os seus vastos conhecimentos (quase enciclopédicos), pois tanto escreve sobre:

    "La prise de Rio de Janeiro par les Français en 1711" - Revista "Tradition" no. 250 Juillet/Août de 2010, ou

    "L'Armée Assyrienne" - revista "Prétorien" N. 15 Juillet/Setembre 2010, ou

    " L'Héroisme du 8 Septembre 1855:la prise de Malakoff" - revista "Tradition" Janvier/Février 2010 ou

    "L'Armée de L'Inde Britannique 1796-1815, revista "Soldats Napoléoniens" No 24, Décembre 2009, ou

    " "Miliciens et Volontaires du Royaume-Uni 1793-1815", revista "Soldats Napoléoniens" No 25 de Mars de 2010

    etc., etc., etc., etc.

    Não resta dúvidas que é uma produção enorme, extraordinária e muito variada, sobre temas, países e épocas tão diferentes, que vão desde a antiguidade até aos nossos dias... bravo!

    Diz-se aqui em Portugal "como é possível, uma só pessoa tocar tantos instrumentos" quer isto dizer, mais ou menos "como é possível um só músico tocar todos os instrumentos de uma orquestra sinfónica" certamente alguns tocará bem, outros menos mal e outros mal...

    Sobre os três volumes da Osprey direi que são bons, embora tenham algumas falhas (o que é natural) é que além da complexidade dos nossos regulamentos também existe a língua e a interpretação que por vezes não é a mais correcta. As ilustrações são excelentes mas algumas com erros de pormenor. as barretinas (schako) do modelo de 1806 estão todas mal feitas, porque como pode ver no meu livro a frente não é falsa. Nos desenhos o schako é o do modelo inglês 1811/12.

    Reconheço que o autor dos livros se baseou muito em objectos e conselhos menos correctos. Observe que as fotografias dos objectos que estão nos livros: Volume (2) páginas 11, 44 e 45 e volume (3) páginas 44, 45 46 e 47 não são da época! São cópias tendo sido algumas executadas em 1908 para as comemorações dos 100 anos da Guerra Peninsular e que por acaso estão muito mal feitas e cheias de erros.

    O schako da página 44 e 45 são os modelos feitos para as cerimónias anuais da Batalha do Buçaco e estão extremamente mal executados e errados, aliás eu conheço a pessoa que os fez em Lisboa na Fábrica Militar de Fardamentos ( Oficinas Gerais de Fardamento e Equipamento).A da página 46 é um modelo executado recentemente.

    No volume (3) plate A figura 3 que bordados são aqueles que o pífaro tem??? Plate D e os deste tambor, excesso de bordados e o coat of arms do tambor? E a quantidade de bordados do drum-major do volume (1) plate G figura 2 ?? E muito, muito mais.

    Neste momento estou a publicar no Jornal do Exército precisamente os uniformes dos oficiais generais, vou enviar-lhe cópias. O livro sobre a cavalaria: ando a tentar ver se arranjo um exemplar, mas náo está fácil. se não conseguir mando fotocópias.
    Quote Originally Posted by Google Translation
    I've been watching the forum with a lot of attention and need to clarify some things.

    Our friend the Prince of Essling wrote about the officers and generals who read the books in the Osprey "The Portuguese Army of the Napoleonic Wars volume 1, page 33. But the book explains very little about the jobs and the distinctions of the officers. For example correspond to each station a specific embroidery.

    I greatly admire the works of Mr. René Chartrand, especially by his broad knowledge of military history and especially military uniforms and costumes for all ages, from all countries, what puzzles me is its diversity and its extensive knowledge (almost encyclopedic), since both writes:

    "La prize of Rio de Janeiro en 1711 par les Français" - Journal "Tradition" no. 250 Juillet / Août 2010, or

    "L'Armée Assyrienne" - magazine Prétorien "N. 15 Juillet / September 2010, or

    "L'Heroism du 8 Septembre 1855: la gear Malakoff" - magazine "Tradition" Janvier / Février 2010 or

    "L'Armee de L'Inde Britannique 1796-1815, journal Soldats Napoléoniens" At 24, Décembre 2009, or

    "Miliciens Volontaires et du Royaume-Uni 1793-1815", journal Soldats Napoléoniens "In 25 Mars 2010

    etc.. etc.. etc.. etc..

    There is no doubt that is a huge production, very extraordinary and varied topics, as different countries and ages, ranging from antiquity to the present day ... bravo!

    It says here in Portugal "as is possible, one person playing all instruments" that is to say, more or less "how can a single musician playing all the instruments of a symphony orchestra" certainly will play some good, some less evil and other bad ...

    Over the three volumes of the Osprey will say are good, although a few flaws (which is natural) is that besides the complexity of our regulations, there is also the language and the interpretation which is sometimes not the right one. The illustrations are excellent but with some errors of detail. the shako (Schako) Model 1806 are all poorly made, because how can see my book on the front is not false. In the drawings the Schako is the English model 1811/12.

    I recognize that the author of the books were based on objects and less accurate advice. Note that the photographs of objects that are in the books: Volume (2) pages 11, 44 and 45 and volume (3) pages 44, 45, 46 and 47 are not the time! Some copies are being executed in 1908 for the celebrations of 100 years of the Peninsular War and that by chance are very badly made and full of errors.

    The Schako page 44 and 45 models are made for the annual ceremonies Battle Buçaco and are poorly executed and very wrong, indeed I know the person who made them in Lisbon Factory military uniforms (General Workshop for uniforms and equipment) . The page 46 is a model recently implemented.

    In volume (3) plate Figure 3 are embroidered that those who have the fife?? Plate D, and this barrel, over-embroidered coat of arms and the drum? And the amount of embroidery of the drum-major of the volume (1) G plate Figure 2? And much, much more.

    I am currently publish in the Official Army precisely the uniforms of generals, I will send you copies. The book about the cavalry: I'm trying to see if I can get a copy, but it is not easy. if you can not send photocopies.
    Colonialism 1600AD



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  18. #18
    Prince of Essling's Avatar Napoleonic Enthusiast
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Many thanks and most interesting comments by Sr Rodrigues who makes a very good point about needing to be wary as no single person can have an encyclopedic knowledge ........

  19. #19
    Geronimo2006's Avatar TAR Local Moderator
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Good news. Sr Rodrigues sent me pictures of the uniforms of the Marines in the Napoleonic Wars. I will post them here. BRM = Brigada Real na Marinha/Royal Marine Brigade):

    1807 BRM Shako:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    BRM Artillery Shako (1807):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    BRM artillery (1806):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Brigada Real da Marinha (BRM), 1807:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    From re-enactment (Royal Marine Brigade/Brigada Real da Marinha ):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    1st Lieutenant (1807):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Fusilier of Navy (1807) (front with summer uniform; back with Winter uniform):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    BRM Captain/Capitao (1807):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    BRM (1814) (man with red sash around waist is an officer):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Naval Enginner Constructor/engenheiro construtor naval (1806):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    1° Piloto da armada (1806):
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Last edited by Geronimo2006; July 23, 2010 at 11:42 PM.
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  20. #20
    Geronimo2006's Avatar TAR Local Moderator
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    Default Re: Portuguese Uniforms of the Peninsular War

    Sr Rodrigues has sent me some artillery pictures from the Peninsular War (mostly photographs from re-enactments in Almeida and Lamego).:
    Quote Originally Posted by MRR
    Today I will resume the Peninsular War and the effect of sending some pictures and two pictures on Artillery. The photographs were taken by me, the 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 and 12 are in Lamego in 2008 and were made during an exhibition that I organized with material from my private collection, on the Peninsular war (if you find it interesting I can send some pictures of it) was at the Center for Special Operations troops (aka Rangers), the number 5, 6, 7 and 8 were also taken by me in Almeida during a reenactment of that I was part of jury that was going to award a prize on "the best of popular militias paisano" (I also have photos). The engravings are from my collection.
    MRR says: "No. 1 - this is a Captain of Artillery, the strands of "Schako" beyond the blue and red should be mixed umbilical cord of gold":
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    MRR says: "No. 2 - the tassels of the following "band of silk" (sash) should be blue and silver and not red".:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    MRR says: "No. 5 - to our left Infantry, Artillery in the middle and right Cacadores":
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 
    Remaining photographs:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 















    Engravings from MRR's private collection:
    Spoiler Alert, click show to read: 


    Last edited by Geronimo2006; August 07, 2010 at 05:45 PM. Reason: Adding new regiment pictures and military-music score
    Colonialism 1600AD



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